Law & Order

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When he thinks about his future, Alfredo Trejo takes a deep breath.

"Many of the people who have been rounded up and will be deported, they already know their future," he says. "They'll die of hunger or they'll be killed by bullets."

It's increasingly likely that the next time you have an encounter with a police officer, he or she will be wearing a body camera. And depending on how things go, you may be left wondering: "Can I get a copy of that video?"

There's no single answer to that, or other pressing questions, such as whether you can tell an officer you don't want to be recorded. In the year and a half since the Ferguson, Mo., protests, police departments have been rushing to adopt the cameras.

But when it comes to body camera policies, departments are all over the map.

"Some things are hard and some things are right. And some things are both," Apple CEO Tim Cook said during a Wednesday night interview on ABC News' World News Tonight with David Muir. "This is one of those things," he said, doubling down on the company's refusal to create a way for the FBI to access data on the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters.

While the dispute over cracking into an iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooter is at the center of a legal case between Apple and the FBI, the company recently told a federal court that it has received — and resisted — similar orders to help unlock iPhones and an iPad in recent months.

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