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Daniel LaChance

A new book by Emory History Professor Daniel LaChance tackles the changing perception of capital punishment in America. He argues the court trial, the sentencing, and the execution process are all deeply societal events that reflect the public’s relationship with government. Daniel LaChance joins us in studio.

Varnell City Council Votes To Eliminate Police Department

Jul 12, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

The North Georgia city Varnell has voted to disband its police department.

Media outlets report that Varnell Mayor Anthony Hulsey reinstated Police Chief Lyle Grant on Tuesday morning. However, in a special meeting later that day, the city council voted 3-1 to dissolve the police department "effective immediately." This leaves Grant and 10 officers in limbo.

The elimination comes after police say former city council member Sheldon Fowler assaulted police officers. As a result, Grant was put on paid leave for the way he handled the investigation.

Judge: Man Accused Of Threats To Rep. John Lewis’ Staff Is Competent

Jul 12, 2017

A man accused of threatening the staff of U.S. Rep. John Lewis has been deemed competent to stand trial.

A report from the warden at the Federal Medical Center in Lexington, Kentucky, indicates that Dante Antione Rosser is competent to stand trial and understands the nature of the legal proceedings, U.S. Magistrate Judge Alan Baverman said Tuesday.

Baverman had ordered a mental health evaluation during a hearing in March.

27 Arrested In 4-Day Police Sting Targeting Guns, Felons

Jul 12, 2017
WCN 24/7 / Flickr/CC

The Savannah-Chatham police department conducted a four-day operation targeting illegal guns and convicted felons, netting 27 arrests.

Georgia state agencies have ramped up efforts to crack down on elder abuse, with law enforcement training and a tougher criminal code.

But an underlying anxiety exists among several officials who feel the issue will continue to plague at-risk Georgians until stricter protocols are put in place to track offenses, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

Despite a new statewide focus on the issue, Georgia has no elder abuse registry, unlike Tennessee and New Hampshire, two leading states in addressing elder abuse.


Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

UPDATE: Savannah Police: Shootings, Crash 'Gang Related'

Jul 6, 2017
Courtesy of SCMPD

Savannah's police chief is blaming gang members for shootings in the city's downtown historic district that led to a police chase in which a fleeing SUV crashed and killed three people.

Savannah-Chatham County Police Chief Joseph Lumpkin said at a news conference Wednesday the shootings that wounded three people at about 12:13 a.m. were "group-gang" related. He showed reporters video of an SUV pulling alongside a sidewalk bench where several people sat before they jumped suddenly and ran as shots were fired.

The New York City neighborhood where a gunman walked up to a truck-like mobile police command vehicle early Wednesday and shot into a window killing Officer Miosotis Familia, is in a high-crime area of the Bronx.

Authorities say they are still working to identify the shooter's motive, but still, Familia's death stunned residents such as Liz Fabers.

"Did she deserve to die, hell no, nobody shouldn't walked up on her and just killed her," she says.

Arrest Made In Savannah Shootings, Car Crash That Killed 3

Jul 5, 2017
Courtesy of SCMPD

Late-night Fourth of July celebrations in Savannah's downtown historic district erupted into chaos early Wednesday after gunfire wounded three people in a popular nightlife district, leading to a police chase in which a fleeing vehicle crashed and killed three others.

It's been almost four years since Patrisse Khan-Cullors helped birth the hashtag #blacklivesmatter. Those three words gained national attention for demonstrations against police brutality and grew into a movement.

But progress has been slow, admits Khan-Cullors, a Los Angeles-based activist who co-founded the Black Lives Matter Network.