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It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men.

Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us to talk about the findings.

Experts Worry About Loopholes In Prescription Drug Bill

3 hours ago
Frankie Leon / Flickr/CC

Georgia lawmakers have reached a compromise on a bill that would require doctors to log into a pill-tracking database before prescribing painkillers and other high-risk drugs. The goal is to curtail the overprescribing of opioids.

But critics say loopholes written into the proposal would create a false sense of accomplishment while leaving patients exposed to harm. Physician groups counter that the exceptions are necessary to reduce the burden on already strained doctors.

Courtesy Peter Bergen

Today on “Political Rewind” we spend the full hour with terrorism expert Peter Bergen. The author of "The United States of Jihad," Bergen is an authority on the topic. In addition to being CNN's Terror Analyst, Bergen is one of the few Western journalists to have interviewed Osama bin Laden in 1997. In the era of travel bans targeting mostly Muslim nations, Bergen says his research shows that the terrorists are already among us, like the Tsarnaev brothers who masterminded the Boston Marathon bombings. They may have been born here, or they may be naturalized U.S.

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss. Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

Cliff Owen / AP Photo

The NPR Two-Way blog will provide live coverage of the House Intelligence Committee’s public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The live blog will include streaming video of the proceedings, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

Our guest today on “Two Way Street” is George Saunders. We’re going to talk about his new book “Lincoln in the Bardo,” which has been one of the most eagerly anticipated works of fiction in a long time.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we first discuss a late-breaking report that recently fired U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara was investigating stock trades made by HHS Secretary (and former Georgia congressman) Tom Price. The report appeared on the website ProPublica.

The FBI is investigating an alleged breach of voter data at Kennesaw State University. State officials learned earlier this month that more than seven million voter records from the KSU Center for Elections Systems may have been compromised. The University has made an initial statement, but no other comments have been made. With us to discuss this is Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

The Trump administration unveiled its proposed 2018 budget Thursday morning. Unsurprisingly, the budget calls for significant increases in military and border security spending while dramatically reducing the funding for a number of other government agencies.

Several of those cuts, including reductions at the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting will affect a variety of Georgia-based programs that receive federal funding.

"Mr. Tuck & the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted 13 students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck. The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We talked with Harris, along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

Brad Clinesmith / Foter

The motor vehicle death rate in Georgia has jumped by more than 30 percent since 2014. That’s the fifth highest jump in the nation, where fatalities comparatively rose only 14 percent. Those numbers come from a National Safety Council study released last month. The top three killers: speed, alcohol, and distraction.

We invited Natalie Dale, spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Transportation, to shed some light on this.

Photo courtesy of John Harris

"Mr. Tuck And the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first elementary school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted thirteen students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck.

The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We spoke with Harris along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

Stephan Savoia / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” it's the Ides of March. Should FBI Director James Comey keep an eye on his back? Comey is meeting with a Senate subcommittee to discuss rumors of Russian tampering and allegations of Obama wiretapping during the last election. And what about Trumpcare? As the president goes on the road to stump for the plan, are the CBO and OMB reports cause for major concern? Can the Republican Party come to some kind of agreement on the plan?

As the race to fill Tom Price’s 6th District Congressional seat heats up, Democrats hope all that activity translates to votes in the special election next month. Jon Ossoff, 30, is encouraging Democrats with his “Make Trump Furious” campaign, and raising a considerable amount of grassroots support. We learn more about Ossoff’s campaign and the race ahead with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

Court: Discrimination Against Gay Workers Not Prohibited

Mar 14, 2017
uscourts.gov

In a setback for gay rights advocates hoping for an expansion of workplace discrimination protections, a federal appeals court in Atlanta has ruled that employers aren't prohibited from discriminating against employees because of sexual orientation.

A three-judge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday ruled 2-1 that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits workplace discrimination based on a variety of factors, doesn't protect against workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation.

It’s nearly spring. That means plants will begin to peek out of the soil again, insects return in force, and you might start to see more critters wandering around. On this show, we focus on Georgia’s wildlife from the bushy tailed variety that climb our trees, to the ancient shelled kind that swim off our shores.

Michelle / Flickr/CC

Today on “Political Rewind,” is your microwave watching you? On Sunday, Kellyanne Conway, Counselor to the President, suggested some unusual ways that the Obama administration might have surveilled Donald Trump. Meanwhile, Sen. John McCain says Trump needs to put up or shut up about his claims of illegal wiretapping. Where will this investigation go?

Personal finance site WalletHub conducted a recent study rating the healthiest and unhealthiest cities in the country. According to the study, Augusta, Georgia is one of the unhealthiest cities in the nation. This is based on a number of factors, like the cost of a doctor visit, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fitness clubs per capita.

Ruth Schowalter

On today’s edition of “Two Way Street” we’re going to go underground. We’ll explore cool, dark, subterranean regions where thousands of species – from humans to reptiles to insects – have sought shelter and safety, in some cases for hundreds of millions of years, back to the earliest appearances of animal life on Earth.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” repeal and replace ... with what?  The Republicans have rolled out their healthcare plan but it's a hard sell even within the party. We take a deep dive into the perplexing problems that a national health care plan means with Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.  

Michael Chen / Flickr

George Mack Bird, III, a Georgia gynecologist, had a 176-count indictment returned against him by a federal grand jury in Savannah for allegedly running a pill mill and money laundering.

Federal agents seized $1 million in cash from Bird at the time of his arrest and have since frozen an additional $3.9 million held in various bank and investment accounts.

This is a live broadcast from Savannah for the Stopover Music Festival.

We start off the show with a conversation about shark fins. The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of these fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News. We also spoke with Lora Snyder, the Shark Campaign Director for the nonprofit group Oceana.

Bonita Johnson suffers with the lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD.

Twice she went to the hospital emergency room because she had trouble breathing, the last time about a year ago. That ER was in Monroe County Hospital in Forsyth.

We did a live show from The Grey restaurant in Savannah, Georgia for the Savannah Stopover Music Festival.

 

 

The Stopover Music Festival has been going strong now for seven years. More than 80 bands will perform this weekend, including musicians Kishi Bashi and Julien Baker. Kayne Lanahan is the founder and organizer of the festival. We spoke with her about the festival and what she’s excited to see and hear this weekend.

Georgia Citizens Panel

Mar 8, 2017

Today on “Political Rewind,” we put some listeners in the hot seat. Our Citizens Panel (including one green card resident from Germany), joined us at GPB studios to tell us about their reactions to the first few weeks of the Donald Trump presidency.

WIKIPEDIA COMMONS / Creative Commons

Attorneys on both sides of a high-profile case of what was alleged to be voter fraud in Georgia say they have agreed those charges were unfounded.

In the lead up to a contentious local election in 2015, sheriff’s deputies in Hancock County ­– 100 miles east of Atlanta – knocked on doors checking to see if voters were living where their drivers’ licenses said they did. The board of elections identified 180 voters, mostly African-American, who were mismatched and accused them of voter fraud.

After out-of-court mediation, an agreement issued this week refutes that. 

Atlanta Hawks Awarded For Diversity Efforts

Mar 8, 2017
@CavsSirCC on Twitter / NBA.com

On March 2, the Atlanta Hawks Basketball Club was awarded the Best Diversity Campaign or Initiative Award at the 3rd Annual Cynopsis Social Good Awards in New York. The award is given to a network, brand, agency or corporation that is committed to racial, ethnic, religious, and gender diversity.

Weekend Events Put New Express Lanes To The Test

Mar 8, 2017
formulanone / Flickr

Traffic can’t be avoided in Atlanta. But the newly constructed express lanes on I-75 aim to provide a smoother commute for the South Metro area.

"The general purpose lanes have improved congestion and the residents are happy to have a new choice for their commute," said Natalie Dale, spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Transportation. 

Georgia singer Jamie Barton is a rising star in the opera world. She’s only 35 but her voice has filled concert halls all over the world. In 2015, she nabbed the prestigious Richard Tucker Award. It’s a $50,000 prize sometimes called the "Heisman Trophy" of Music. But Barton hails from a place not often associated with grand opera--Rome, Georgia. We revisit a conversation with Jamie about finding a passion for opera in an unusual setting.

speaker.gov

As lawmakers continue to pour over the Republican plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, members of Georgia’s congressional delegation have started to respond.

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