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Georgia Wants To Execute Inmates Accused Of Killing Guards

20 hours ago
Bob Andres / Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, Pool

Two inmates accused of killing their guards on a Georgia prison bus three months ago were indicted Tuesday on multiple charges, including murder, and the state plans to seek the death penalty.

A grand jury indicted Donnie Russell Rowe, 44, and Ricky Dubose, 24. Each man faces two counts of murder, two counts of felony murder, one count of escape and one count of hijacking a motor vehicle.

Ocmulgee Judicial Circuit District Attorney Stephen Bradley filed notice with the court Tuesday that he plans to seek the death penalty against both men.

3 People Charged With Inciting Riot After Georgia Tech Vigil

20 hours ago
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Three people face charges of inciting a riot and battery of an officer after violent clashes with campus police at Georgia Tech following a vigil for a student fatally shot by officers, a university spokesman said Tuesday.

Police shot and killed Scout Schultz, 21, Saturday night after the student himself called 911 to report an armed and possibly intoxicated suspicious person, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said.

Georgia Tech hasn't identified the officer who fired the fatal shot and has refused to release any information about the officers who confronted Schultz.

Courtesy of Theatre Macon

Theatre Macon has fostered talent in Middle Georgia for over three decades. Founding Artistic Director Jim Crisp has been with the theater since its inception 32 years ago. He announced this summer he would retire at the end of the upcoming season. We talk with Crisp about the legacy of the theater in Macon, and his work on hundreds of stage productions. 

Alex Brandon / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” health care is back in the political headlines. Insurance companies are warning that rates are about to skyrocket – in part because of the uncertainty about how the Trump administration intends to support Obamacare. Tom Price is making dramatic cuts in money to help educate consumers on buying insurance from the exchanges, which critics say suppress registrations for insurance.

Meanwhile on Capitol Hill there’s a new GOP push to repeal and replace the ACA. Will it go anywhere?

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

GPB News

As the world comes to grips with the unprecedented damage of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, millions of Americans in the southeastern United States are working to rebuild their lives. Irma crossed into Georgia in the early morning hours of Monday, September 11, 2017. Over the next 24 hours, water inundated island and beach communities over 100 miles of coastline. Winds topping 69 miles per hour toppled trees and power lines. 1.1 million Georgians lost power and three lost their lives.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Governor Deal returns from a statewide inspection of damage from Hurricane Irma. He says the federal government has pledged support in the restoration effort. But how do requests for federal aid rub against conservative principles calling for a reduction in government spending? Our panel weighs in on the issue.

The B-52s made it big. And the iconic band from Athens takes the stage in their home state tonight, Sept. 15, at the Atlanta Symphony Hall. We revisit an interview with founding member Kate Pierson.

Hurricane Irma put a lot of lives on hold. But for Jacob Gmitter of Lakeland, Florida, there was one thing that just couldn’t wait. GPB reporter Grant Blankenship brings us the story of a young saxophonist on the road.

Commentary: Climate Change Missing From Storm Coverage

Sep 15, 2017

The constant media coverage of Hurricane Irma kept people up to speed on the storm’s intensity and the damage it caused. But journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News says there was one thing most of the coverage was missing

The number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the many suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta. Michael Rich, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University, also joins us.

Today on “Two Way Street,” we revisit our conversation with author George Saunders. He spoke with us in March about his first full-length novel “Lincoln in the Bardo,” which takes place during the first 24-hours after Willie Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln’s 11-year old son, dies.

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

Power is slowly being restored in Macon following high winds from Hurricane Irma that knocked down trees and power poles. Many businesses opened up Wednesday for the first time.

Stephen B. Morton / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we look at the damages that Irma wreaked on Georgia. Governor Nathan Deal joins us to discuss the areas of the state that are in the greatest need of help, where damage is greatest, and where the largest numbers of people have been displaced. What does the governor expect the federal government will do for the state? How quickly will recovery money flow from Washington to Georgia?

Animal shelters in Georgia are at capacity. As millions fled the storms this week, many pet owners left their furry friends in shelters across the state. We talk about how shelters are accommodating the overcrowding with Tracey Belew, Shelter Manager for the Macon-Bibb County Animal Welfare Department.

As Hurricane Irma hit Georgia, hundreds of evacuated horses, goats and cows sheltered at the Georgia National Fairgrounds south of Macon. GPB's Emily Cureton brings us an audio postcard.

J. Cindy Hill / GPB News

On Monday, September 11, Tybee Island experienced storm surge flooding from Hurricane Irma. This excess water along with an astronomical high tide flooded parts of the island. We spoke with Mayor Jason Buelterman just after the only bridge connecting Tybee to the mainland opened the following afternoon.

GPB: Describe what you’re seeing on the island.

Wilfredo Lee / AP Photo

Animal shelters in Georgia are at capacity. As millions fled the storms this week, many pet owners left their furry friends in shelters across the state. We talk about how shelters are accommodating the overcrowding with Tracey Belew, Shelter Manager for the Macon-Bibb County Animal Welfare Department.

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

Two of Macon's five Red Cross Shelters closed Tuesday. By the afternoon there were less than 400 people staying in them. Chelsea McKinley and her family have been in Macon nearly a week. She said their home in Homestead, Florida is in good shape but she's worried about people in the Keys where she grew up.

"I have a lot of friends in the Keys. I grew up there. My mom, she has an apartment there too. So, it's a lot of trees knocked down," she said. "There's actually a restaurant called Snappers and it's completely torn down from what I see on the news."

After Irma, Florida's Evacuees Contemplate Return Trip

Sep 12, 2017
Bill Barrow / AP Photo

Thanks to reconnaissance by a neighbor who stayed behind, Pam Szymanksi knows Hurricane Irma blew out the living room window of her southwest Florida home, but she isn't sure when she'll get to see the damage for herself.

"All I know is we have to check out of here tomorrow, because they're booked," she said Monday, sitting in the lobby of a downtown Atlanta hotel where she arrived with her mother, two children and two dogs. A hotel reservation in Valdosta, Georgia, is next, Szymanksi said, but that's still 350 miles from their home in Fort Myers.

Irma Kills 3 In South Carolina And 2 In Georgia

Sep 12, 2017
Stephen B. Morton / AP Photo

The remnants of Hurricane Irma forced Atlanta's international airport - the world's busiest passenger airport - to cancel nearly 200 flights early Tuesday. The storm also claimed three lives in South Carolina and two in Georgia.

Hurricane Irma has made landfall, and is working its way up our state. The remnants of Irma were downgraded to a tropical storm, but that storm remains a major threat. We checked in with National Weather Service meteorologist Dave Nadler and GPB reporter Emily Jones.

Author Greg Iles has sold millions of books. He’s written 15 novels, 12 of which have been New York Times best sellers. His latest novel is “Mississippi Blood” -- the final installment of a trilogy that he began eight years ago. We revisited our conversation with Greg Iles from back in March.

GPB News/Grant Blankenship

Hundreds of thousands of Georgians are without power as rain and wind whips through the state, downing trees and damaging power lines. In Macon, many people are sheltering at facilities managed by the Red Cross and local churches. 

Irma: Real-Time Updates

Sep 11, 2017
NOAA

Follow along for up-to-the-minute coverage of Hurricane Irma.

Irma Prompts 1st Ever Tropical Storm Warning For Atlanta

Sep 11, 2017
Stephen B. Morton / AP Photo

Widespread threats from Hurricane Irma prompted Georgia's governor to declare an emergency Sunday for the entire state, where coastal Savannah was evacuated for the second time in less than a year and Atlanta faced its first-ever tropical storm warning.

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET

Irma, once a powerful and longrunning hurricane, weakened to a tropical depression as it moved through Georgia on its way to Alabama. It continues to dump heavy rain but all surge warnings have been canceled.

Irma has left behind dangerous floodwaters, power outages for millions of people and the debris it has made of human possessions across Florida.

The huge storm remained a Category 1 hurricane through early Monday, before finally being downgraded to a tropical storm and then a tropical depression.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Middle Georgia is bracing for tropical storm force winds by Monday afternoon. This news put many evacuees staying in RVs back on the road. At a campground outside of Macon, most campers cleared out Sunday. But a few Floridians decided to stay put.

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

Vineville Methodist Church in Macon has opened its doors to first responders. Soldiers with the Georgia Department of Defense's 5th Brigade are staying there to help out during Hurricane Irma.

They are here assisting in shelters, distributing supplies and staffing the Emergency Operations Center. Lieutenant Colonel Jim Moore came to Macon from Norcross. He said, "Central Georgia is on the 'dirty' side of the storm and could see extreme winds, flooding and tornados. We are not used to weather like this."

Josephine Bennett

Macon opened a fourth Red Cross shelter as people continued to arrive from Florida and the Georgia coast. As of Saturday afternoon, 350 people were registered with the Red Cross but more are expected. A special shelter designated for pets also continued to receive cats and dogs.

Cheryl Cardinal's home sits 30 feet from the beach on Key Largo. She left her home on Wednesday and arrived in Macon 24 hours later. She came with her family including her daughter who is eight months pregnant. She said they brought their two cats but not much else.

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

In the last two days close to 200 people have shown up for Red Cross volunteer training classes. The organization asked for help manning the four shelters that have opened in Macon to house Hurricane Irma evacuees. 

The three hour abbreviated training was developed during the response to Hurricane Harvey in Texas. Normally the classes take several days to complete. 

Gaines Harman with the Red Cross is conducting the classes. He said once certified, the volunteers will be deployed to local shelters. 

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

In advance of Hurricane Irma 45 babies from Savannah Memorial Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit evacuated to several Georgia hospitals. Fifteen of the babies were transported via ambulance and helicopter to Navicent Health in Macon.

Dr. Mitch Rodriguez is the Medical Director of the NICU. He said, "Some of our patients that came were relatively stable, just completing their hospitalization. Some of them were relatively critical in the sense that they were either post-surgical and or still on the ventilator or on a significant amount of support."

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