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On today’s show we talk to two singer-songwriters who are part of the rich community of musical artists who live and work in Nashville – one of the great music mecca’s of this country.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we are one month into the Trump administration and for members of the American media, it’s been a very rocky road so far. From Steve Bannon’s declaration that the media are the “opposition party” to yesterday’s unorthodox presidential press briefing, the disconnect is very real and very apparent. 

Matt Barnett / Flickr

A new education bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Kevin Tanner would allow the state to provide systems of support and assistance for low-performing schools in Georgia.

One of the featured authors at the festival is Forbes Financial Columnist John Tamny, who is author of the book “Who Needs the Fed?” We take a look at the role of the fed, and ask Tamny about how it may change in the Trump administration. The Fed also will see some big changes this month in Atlanta, as the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta steps down.

 

 

Georgia House Panel Approves Bill Allowing Guns On Campus

Feb 17, 2017
Ken Lund / Flickr

Licensed gun owners could carry concealed handguns on public college campuses under legislation that began advancing Thursday in the Georgia House despite the Republican governor's forceful veto of a similar bill last year.

A subcommittee of the House Public Safety Committee approved the bill sponsored by Rep. Mandi Ballinger, R-Canton, sending it on to the full committee. Georgia is among 17 states that ban concealed weapons on campus.

New research from the Pew Research Center finds over a quarter of Americans adults haven’t read a book in the last year--in part or in whole. That includes all forms of reading, such as print, e-books, and audio books. We talk about this with Austin Dickson, Executive Director of Literacy Action, and Emily Rubin, Educational Outreach Specialist for the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta.

Senators Work To Slash THC Potency In Medical Cannabis

Feb 16, 2017
Bob Doran / Flickr

Georgia Senators are working to slash the potency of medical cannabis oil while slightly expanding access.

The bill passed the full Senate Thursday with a vote of 41-12 after lengthy debate and the rejection of three amendments proposed during discussion.

Bryan Cox / U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take a deep dive into immigration issues, something that touches the lives and businesses of more Georgians than you might realize. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

How will you celebrate when you pay off your house? After 20 years in her home purchased with the help of Macon Area Habitat for Humanity, Lillie Ward burned her mortgage.

Tom Wolf / Flickr

The University System of Georgia is making an antidote for opioid overdoses available on all its campuses.  The drug Naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdose on opioids like heroin and fentanyl.

The use and addiction of the opioid heroin has increased throughout the United States and is trending among 18-25 year olds. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a little over 1,300 people died in Georgia from opioid overdoses in 2015, the most recent year with available data.

Lawmakers Trying To Ease Restrictions On Alcohol Sales

Feb 15, 2017
Thomas Cizauskas / CC

The Georgia brewery bill has turned into the booze bill.

Lawmakers combined legislation that allows breweries to sell directly to the customer with another proposal that would permit distilleries to do the same thing.

There’s a major climate change conference on Thursday in Atlanta. It’s happening at the Carter Center, but only because it was canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We talked with Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association, who is giving the keynote address at the conference. We also checked in with environmental journalist Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News.

Kiezers / Wikimedia Commons

A special master appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court has sided with Georgia in the state’s long-running dispute with Florida over water rights in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin.

On this special Valentine's Day show, we spend the day talking to Georgia couples who’ve kept romance alive even though they work together. We also talk about the challenge of being single, along with the falling divorce rate.

We start with a story of truly enduring love. J.B. and Lynette Tuttle have been married for more than 70 years. The Savannah couple is now in their 90s. They're both retired and live together in a nursing home. GPB's Sean Powers brings us their timeless story of romance.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” State Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon) continues his push to expand the legal use of medical marijuana in the state of Georgia. 

Repealing the Affordable Care Act could cost Georgia more than $20 million a year. It would also cost the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly $900 million—12 percent of the agency’s budget. Republicans leading the repeal effort call the money a “slush fund.” That means to imply that millions of untracked dollars are used for projects that have little benefit for public health. Joining us to discuss this is Andy Miller, editor for Georgia Health News.

On today’s show we’re going to talk to historian and author Timothy Tyson. His new book, “The Blood of Emmett Till,” is an in-depth exploration of the horrific 1955 murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, the Chicago boy who traveled to Money, Mississippi to visit his mother’s family and who after a fateful chance encounter with a white woman in a general store was kidnapped and brutally murdered.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Today on “Political Rewind,” the voters are getting restless and are starting to take out their frustrations on their representatives in Washington. Last night, a town hall meeting in Utah turned ugly for Congressman Jason Chaffetz. Today, staffers for Georgia Senators Johnny Isakson and David Perdue and Rep. Jody Hice got similar treatment as they hosted a "constituent service day." Is this the new normal for lawmakers? And will these protests morph into an organized movement like the Tea Party? 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

This was going to be a town hall whether anyone planned it that way or not.

Hundreds of people piled into the boardroom of the Green County Board of Commissioners to speak with workers from the offices of Senator David Perdue, Senator Johnny Isakson and 10th Congressional District Representative Jody Hice. Things started well when Jessica Hayes from Hice’s office shared some news.

“This is the largest crowd we’ve ever had for mobile office hours,” she said.

Actor George Takei first warp sped to fame as a young Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. But he’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. “Allegiance,” a play inspired by George’s experiences in an American Internment camp during World War II, is hitting movie theaters next week--including eight in the metro Atlanta area. Georgie Takei is in the studio to talk about the play, and the parallels he sees draws between his past and current events.

Keenan Jones / GPB

The Breakroom gang is back, and we’ve got a lot to talk about. We’ll discuss whether Super Bowl performances by Lady Gaga and The Schuyler Sisters need really be controversial. Plus, we’ll look at why the online dictionary is going viral, and how social media sites are stepping up to combat fake news. 

The Breakroom for today is:

Jason Vorhees / The Macon Telegraph

Jordan Harrell is a great speller. But there was a time when this year's Bibb County School District spelling champ was never guaranteed to ever spell. Or even speak.

Grammy nominated singer/songwriter Andra Day visited Georgia in December. Day has sung at the White House and on the BET Awards show. She was discovered, in part, by Stevie Wonder, who appeared alongside her in an iconic Apple TV ad in 2015. Her song “Rise Up” went multi-platinum. She joins us to talk about her explosive career.

Then, we hear a pair of songs from our essential Georgia Playlist. Jason Rodgers, conductor of the all-black orchestra known as “Orchestra Noir,” joins the show to share two of his favorite Georgia tunes from Ray Charles and James Brown.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” a U.S. Senate scuffle over the Jeff Sessions nomination is sparking lots of conversation. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) shut down Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) when she started quoting a letter that Coretta Scott King wrote denouncing Sessions in 1986.

Author Sheri Riley began her professional life at a record label in Atlanta. As marketing director at LaFace Records, she helped put numerous hip hop artists on the map -- TLC, Toni Braxton, and Usher, to name a few. But Sheri gave all that up to research and write about healthy lifestyles. She joins us to talk about her new book, “Exponential Living,” which comes out this week.

This is show is a celebration of Black History Month. Since 1970, February has been dedicated to celebrating the contributions and achievements of African-Americans. We talk about the "Bank Black" movement, some tragic history in Savannah, a daring escape from Macon, and even how to handle a controversial term in the classroom.

 

A study by Emory University found that people view the term “African-American” more favorably than “black.” We talked with Erika Hall, who worked on the study, about what this might mean for prospective job seekers.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we're trying to distract ourselves after the unfortunate outcome of Super Bowl LI, so we're wading back into the national political waters! We're greatly pleased to have Time magazine editor-at-large David von Drehle joining us from KCUR in Kansas City to talk about the current cover article: "Is Steve Bannon the Second Most Powerful Man in the World?"

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Abortion rights groups are keeping a close eye on Washington as President Trump vows to see the landmark Roe v. Wade decision overturned. Last week, he announced his choice to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Abortion rights groups are keeping a close eye on Washington as President Trump vows to see the landmark Roe v. Wade decision overturned. Last week, he announced his choice to the U.S. Supreme Court. Trump has promised to only appoint “pro-life judges.” Members of Congress are also pushing legislation to restrict abortions. A bill sponsored by Georgia Congressman Jody Hice would legally define human life as beginning at conception. The bill also states that embryos are allowed the same “right to life” as human beings. We’ve explored the abortion debate before.

Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians

Our show today is devoted to looking at the work of one of Georgia’s literary giants: Carson McCullers. She was born in Columbus in 1917. Her father ran a jewelry store. Her mother’s chief occupation always seemed to be doting upon and caring for her sickly daughter Carson.

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