Ways to Connect

On this edition of Political Rewind, to bring high speed internet to rural Georgia, legislators are looking at a broad range of taxes on services every Georgian uses, from streaming services to media downloads, even to satellite TV services.  Will the proposal fly in an election year?  Also, legislators look to impose a stiffer tax on used car purchases while also looking to bring back a tax break for electric vehicles.  As the legislative session unfolds, two GOP candidates for governor are dueling over a proposal to eliminate the state income tax. 


On this edition of Political Rewind, we take the show on the road to Savannah, thanks to an invitation from the League of Women Voters of Coastal Georgia.  Before a live audience, our panelists discussed news and issues in the Savannah area that have statewide implications.  Should the Talmadge name be stripped off the bridge that crosses over the gateway to the ever-growing Port of Savannah?  How do residents and local officials feel about the possibility of oil drilling just offshore?  We also talk about how funding is doled out for transportation issues facing the state as well as the fu

Grant Blankenship / GPB



Macon’s Target store is closed. When Target announced it was closing a dozen stores across the country, people in Macon were disappointed to learn the Presidential Parkway store on the was on the list.

If there was an upshot, it was the going out of business sale. That’s how Robert and Mikieoel Revels loaded up with the children’s clothes they had when they left the store a few weeks before it closed with their son Noah. Though they were happy for the bargains, Robert Revels said he wasn’t happy to lose the store.

What’s your idea of quality time? Author David Giffels has an unusual answer to that. He enlisted his father to help him build his own coffin. That project is the subject of David’s new book, “Furnishing Eternity: a Father, a Son, a Coffin, and a Measure of Life.

Georgia could make it more difficult for underage girls to get an abortion. Legislation filed in the Georgia state Senate would require underage girls to justify why they should be allowed to avoid notifying a parent or guardian if they are getting an abortion. At the federal level, President Trump has vowed to see the Roe v. Wade decision overturned. We move away from the political side the abortion debate, and focus on the science. For that, we talked with Didi Saint Louis, an Atlanta-based physician for reproductive health.

(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

The rules embedded in the new federal tax law could mean many Georgians will pay higher state income tax.  State legislators want to find a way to give that money back.  Will they succeed?  Also, a new report confirms what Atlantans already know—the city has some of the worst traffic in the world.  Does that add urgency to the new push in the legislature for expanding transit?  Plus, a spokesman for Casey Cagle has an interesting response to a second GOP gubernatorial candidate using Cagle’s likeness in a campaign ad.


Katie Atkinson / Center for Collaborative Journalism

An annual speech at a Georgia university that usually occurs with little fanfare is attracting controversy this year.


Mercer University's Founder’s Day address will be delivered by alumni Jay Sekulow on Feb. 6. Sekulow is a member of President Donald Trump’s legal team and a prominent figure in the conservative Christian community.

His selection is not sitting well with some students and faculty.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult? We ask these questions with Elena Parent, state Senator for Decatur.

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia primary elections are three months away, but already candidates for governor have amassed $10 million, and one GOP candidate spends a chunk of his case on a Super Bowl ad.  We’ll look at the latest fundraising totals.  Then, the possibility of another government shutdown looks later this week.  Can the White House and Congress reach a deal on immigration before then or will they once again kick the government spending authorization can down the road?  Plus, President Trump insists the Devin Nunes memo proves the Mueller Investigation is a fraud. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?


AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway