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Mayor Keisha? Ethnic Names No Obstacle For Black Candidates

Nov 9, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Atlanta's next mayor could be a black woman named Keisha — a prospect that thrills Diamond Harris.

The 28-year-old graphic designer exulted Wednesday on her Facebook page: "Keisha, Keisha, Keisha! I just want a mayor name Keisha."

Elect Mary Parham Copelan; Milledgeville Mayor / Facebook

By a difference of just five votes, residents of Milledgeville have made history by choosing Mary Parham-Copelan as the city's new mayor.

Parham-Copelan becomes the first woman to win election to that office. She defeated incumbent Gary Thrower in Tuesday's balloting.

Unofficial election results reveal that Parham-Copelan received 833 votes to Thrower's 827 votes.

Parham-Copelan told The Union Recorder residents wanted a change and they worked hard for her, making that change possible.

Cliff Owen / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Democrats finally have something to cheer about, chalking up important victories in Virginia and New Jersey while, in Georgia, Dems cut into the dominant GOP majority in the legislatures. The Atlanta mayor’s race heads into a runoff and once again city voters are confronted by a contest divided on racial lines.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

Slaying That Haunted Family For Decades Now Linked To Racism

Nov 6, 2017
Courtesy of Heather Coggins via AP

When 23-year-old Timothy Coggins was found dead and disfigured beside a Georgia highway in 1983, the young black man's family and neighbors whispered that his killing may be linked to racism.

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," after rolling out their long-awaited tax reform plan, House GOP leaders are already facing resistance from their own ranks, and Democrats are pushing back hard. Also, a new eyewitness report indicates that Jeff Sessions was more aware of efforts to connect the Trump campaign to Russia than he’s admitted. Now Democrats want him to explain himself.

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, which means we'll be getting back that hour of sleep we lost in March. Why do we turn our clocks back? We're getting to the bottom of that and more this week on "Two Way Street." On today's show, we hear from historian Michael O'Malley on the topic of time.

Georgia Attorney General Quits Defense In Server Wiping Case

Nov 2, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo

The Georgia attorney general's office will no longer represent the state's top elections official in an elections integrity lawsuit filed three days before a crucial computer server was quietly wiped clean.

The lawsuit aims to force Georgia to retire its antiquated and heavily questioned touchscreen election technology, which does not provide an auditable paper trail.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the first indictments in the Russia collusion probe remain the chief pre-occupation in Washington, even as the president and the GOP try to shift focus to tax reform and a crucial Trump trip to Asia. Our panel will look at the latest developments in the Mueller probe and weigh in on emerging details in the tax plan. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is under fire for his comments on the causes of the Civil War and the general who led the Confederate Army.

Tony Webster / Flickr/CC

Amazon is opening its fifth fulfillment center in Georgia. Five hundred people will work at the facility in Macon. And Amazon will hire another 500 for the busy holiday shopping season

The deal, dubbed “Project Unicorn,” was rumored for months. But Macon Mayor Robert Reichert said it took a $1.5 million grant from the governor’s office for road improvements to seal it. He says Macon is a popular spot for distribution centers.

A full hour of tricks and treats and from the On Second Thought crew.

 

Georgia native Karin Slaughter has written several international bestsellers and they are not for the faint of heart. These are complicated, tough, and realistic thrillers. Her latest is “The Good Daughter.”  It’s about a terrifying event that rips apart a family and the small town where they live. We spoke with Karin Slaughter about revealing the dark side of Georgia’s small town life.

(AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," in this era of Donald Trump, is the “right” losing its mind? The popular conservative commentator Charlie Sykes thinks so, and he’s written a book to make the case. We talk with Sykes about the book and about the breaking news that’s sending tremors across Washington: Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, has surrendered to the FBI. He and his top aide are the first two handed indictments in the Special Counsel’s Russia probe.

ALEX SANZ / AP PHOTO

On this edition of "Political Rewind," how did voter data end up being erased from state computers even as a lawsuit challenging the integrity of Georgia elections was underway? It’s a story that could haunt top candidates in next year’s statewide elections. Also, President Trump speaks out about the opioid crisis. Did he make it clear he’s ready to commit the resources necessary to make an impact? It matters in Georgia, where the crisis looms large. Plus, Obamacare rates are out for 2018, and Georgians will pay more than people in many other states.

Panelists:

St. Martin's Press

Platinum-selling songwriter Jimmy Webb stopped by our studio last month to talk about his first memoir, "The Cake And The Rain." Artists from Frank Sinatra to Barbara Streisand have recorded Webb's songs. Some of his hits include “Up, Up and Away,” “Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” and “By The Time I Get to Phoenix.”

Congress In Chaos?

Oct 25, 2017
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," is Congress in chaos? Arizona Senator Jeff Flake says he won’t run for re-election just hours after Senator Bob Corker unloads on President Donald Trump. Where does the dissension leave the GOP’s push for tax cuts and how serious is the fracture in the Republican Party?

Chris Ballard / GPB

Guns are more controversial in America than abortion, marijuana, and same-sex marriage. Many of the opinions surrounding guns come from what we hear and see through the media. And yet, our passions about weapons reflect deeper psychological values.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Georgia’s hunting season for firearms opened October 21. GPB’s Emily Cureton joined a father and son hunting deer together opening weekend. She sends us this audio postcard from the woods of Monroe County.

Civil Rights Group: School Retaliated Against Cheerleaders

Oct 25, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

A national civil rights group says it has "grave concerns" about actions taken by a Georgia university after five black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem at a football game.

Manda Rutland / Mvskoke Media

  

For members of the Muscogee Creek Nation, the Ocmulgee National Monument in Macon has been sacred ground for over a thousand years.

 

In the 1930s, archeologists unearthed millions of objects from the site, including the remains of the people who were buried there. Now some of those people have been brought back home.

Members of the Muscogee Creek nation say they are direct descendants of the people whose bodies were unearthed from the Ocmulgee National Monument in the 1930s.

Alex Sanz / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," former President Jimmy Carter wants to help try and end the crisis with North Korea. Will President Trump let him do it? Carter and Trump are different in many ways, but they also have a lot in common. We discuss. 

Experts: Opioid Crisis Is Hitting Georgia Especially Hard

Oct 23, 2017
johnofhammond / Flickr/CC

The nation's deepening opioid epidemic is hitting Georgia harder than most states, experts say.

That's one of the messages that came out of a recent conference at the University of Georgia.

Some of the highest opioid use is in the Rust Belt and the Southeast, authorities said.

Georgia Town Honors Graves Of More Than 1,100 Blacks

Oct 23, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Discriminated against in life, they were forgotten by their community in death, buried in unmarked graves in the back of the Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville, Georgia.

The final resting places of the 1,146 black souls who once lived and worked there were anonymous. Though loved ones may have initially marked the spots with a homemade wooden cross or only a rock, the fragile tributes were lost to time.

Georgia Rep. Price Says HIV Comments Taken Out Of Context

Oct 23, 2017
house.ga.gov

Georgia Rep. Betty Price says her comments on people with HIV that ignited a national firestorm were "taken completely out of context."

Price, the wife of former U.S. Health Secretary Tom Price, was in a legislative committee meeting Tuesday when she asked a state health official whether people with HIV could legally be quarantined.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports Price said Saturday that she was just being "provocative."

This year a federal court in Chicago ruled for the first time that workers can’t be fired based on sexual orientation, extending workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community. Yet, a Georgia judge ruled against a similar case. Now that case is up for appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Jameka Evans claims Georgia Regional Hospital in Savannah fired her for being a lesbian. Earlier this month, 18 state attorneys general filed briefs in support of Evans's petition.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Most school days You can find Jared Moore teaching freshman English at Northeast High School in Macon.


On a recent morning, students all faced each other, with their desks arranged in a room filling oval. Before they got to discussing the day’s text, Moore brought the class to attention.

Elizabeth Tammi / GPB News

 

In September, the home of Ruth Hartley Mosley, a prominent figure in Macon’s history, was officially placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Reverend Levornia Franklin Jr. welcomed guests to the ceremony at Mosley’s former home on Spring Street.

 

“Good morning, and welcome to the Ruth Hartley Mosley Memorial Women’s Center. Come on, give yourselves a hand for coming out this morning," he said.

 

David Goldman / AP Photo

On today’s "Political Rewind" we look at where the GOP race for governor stands in these early days of the contest. A new poll shows Lt. Governor Casey Cagle with a significant lead. But the poll reveals a surprising result in the battle for second place.

Emails: Protests Spur College Officials To Talk With Players

Oct 20, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

As protests over racial injustice grab national attention in pro sports, some college and university officials are having pre-emptive talks with student-athletes and consulting each other amid concerns that such actions will spread to college sports, according to emails released Thursday.

After five black cheerleaders at Kennesaw State University knelt during the national anthem at a September football game, athletic officials there sought advice from their counterparts at schools including the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Duke University and Purdue University.

Imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” The show got a reboot on Netflix this summer. We talk with series creator Joel Hodgson.

This week on "Two Way Street," we're listening back to three of our conversations with some of the bravest, most inventive women to ever step into our studio: writers Molly Brodak and Melissa Febos, and robotics engineer Ayanna Howard.

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