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On this edition of Political Rewind, with primary election approaching rapidly, a new poll from the AJC shows democratic voters remain largely disengaged from the race for governor, but there is a clear-cut favorite among those who have made up their minds.

(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal forges an agreement that will save health care choices for more than half a million Georgians.  Our panel will weigh in on this exercise in gubernatorial clout.  Then, news about the race to succeed Deal: Democrat Stacey Abrams wins two major endorsements in her bid to become Georgia’s next governor while Brian Kemp finds a way to turn a lost endorsement into a win with help from a prominent member of the same organization.  We’ll also look at newly released fundraising totals for candidates in races for congressional seats Democrats are ta

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

On this edition of Political Rewind, one day after James Comey unleashes a barrage of attack on President Trump’s character, the leader of an effort to impeach the president brings his campaign to Georgia.  Will billionaire Tom Steyer find support for his effort here?  Then, an ethics probe find no evidence to back the claims of a woman who accused David Shafer of sexual harassment, but will the accusation linger as Shafer campaigns to become Lieutenant Governor?  Plus, Governor Deal steps in to media a dispute that threatens the health care coverage of hundreds of thousands of Georgians.

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we take the show on the road to Macon and the campus of Mercer University to hear from voters and local political experts about the issues that matter to middle Georgians.  Do residents there feel their voices are heard up I-75 at the State Capitol and how will those feelings resonate come election day?  Also, Macon and Bibb County have a joint government that was intended to save money, but has it worked?  We discuss.

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

Stephen Fowler (GPB)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms calls for the resignations of almost everyone in city leadership.  Will the move help the city begin moving past a corruption scandal and help Bottoms separate herself from her predecessor?  National Guard troops amass on the US-Mexico border under orders of President Trump, who says he will not negotiate on a long-term DACA solution, while here in Georgia, the issue is top of mind for Republican candidates for office.   A leading immigration lawyer joins us to discuss what's happening.  Plus, Democrats seeking to oust

(AP Photo/Leita Cowart)

On this edition of Political Rewind, DeKalb County CEO Michael Thurmond is spearheading a challenging proposal to make Stone Mountain a symbol of diversity and inclusiveness.  Could it be a blueprint for dealing with Confederate memorials around the state?  Also, the latest financial disclosure reports show that Georgia gubernatorial candidates have raked in boatloads of cash, but a couple are far our front in the fundraising sweepstakes.  We’ll look at what the reports tell us about the state of the race.  Plus, in the aftermath of Sinclair Broadcasting’s controversial order demanding a mu

Today on "Political Rewind," we discuss Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue's promise to farmers that they won't bare the brunt of a potential trade war with China. This, even as the President bares down on his threat to expand tariffs on Chinese goods. 

The music of Macon based band Mani exists at a nexus of styles.

The vocals are pushed deep into the mix of their first real release, icanthearwhattheyresayingbutithinkigetit, the better to focus on their mix of world music, math rock, noise and psychedelia.

Guitarist Zach Farr said the project started with his composing and recording on his own until a live band, featuring drummer Steve Ledbetter, started to jel sometime around 2013.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic ruling Brown v. the Board of Education more than six decades ago. Linda Brown, the namesake of that landmark court case, died March 25. She was 76. 

With Brown v. Board, it became illegal to separate public school students by race. But since the landmark ruling, many schools in the South have resegregated, according to a report from the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study also found Latino student enrollment surpassed black enrollment for the first time.

We spoke about the resegregation of southern schools with Erica Frankenberg, associate professor of education at Penn State University, Belisa Urbina, executive director of Ser Familia, and Atlanta Journal-Constitution education reporter Maureen Downey.

On this edition of Political Rewind, the 2018 session of the Georgia General Assembly was gaveled to a close late last night.  What did lawmakers do about measures to crack down on distracted driving, to expand transit across metro Atlanta, or to boost the chances for economic growth in rural Georgia?  We’ll look at these and other accomplishments under the “Gold Dome” this year.  Then, with the session now finished, the sprint to the May primary elections is now under way.  We’ll look at where the top races stand right now.  Plus, the City of Atlanta has been paralyzed by one of the bigges

  • Georgia legislative session ends
  • Columbia County schools to place armed officer in every school
  • Piedmont, Blue Cross near deadline in contract negotiations  

Olivia Re / Ms.

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we are live at the State Capitol as legislators work furiously to finish their business before the 2018 session comes to an end.  We look at the fate of key legislation: what’s happening with bills on distracted riving, protecting religious groups that don’t want to adopt children to gays and lesbians, giving additional help to victims of childhood sexual abuse and cracking down on undocumented immigrants?  Plus, we’ll explain the sneaky tactics that come into play on this last day as legislators try to work their will on measures they want to pa

AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we're asking the question—who is Atticus Finch?

He was a beloved champion of justice in “To Kill a Mockingbird” but a bigot in “Go Set a Watchman.”

Wes Frazer

Southern rock 'n' roll band Lee Bains III and The Glory Fires performs in Macon tonight as part of its Georgia tour.

GPB intern Sophie Peel spoke with lead singer, Lee Bains, about the personal experiences and cultural traditions woven into his music. 

Andre M / Wikimedia Commons

  • Man pleads guilty to Augusta mosque threats
  • Lawmakers rush to pass bills on session's last day
  • Opponents of immigration bill write to Amazon, Facebook
  • Braves open the season at Suntrust Park 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

  

 

The things you find in drawers when you move.

Old credit cards. Single socks. Concert tickets. Phone chargers. Two foot long dead squirrels.

Well, maybe not the squirrels. Unless you’re a scientist moving to a new lab that is. Biologists save all kinds stuff to look at later. Take the science department at Mercer University in Macon for instance.

On this edition of Political Rewind, legislators have just one day left in the 2018 session and a number of key bills remain unresolved.  We’ll look at where the measures that have attracted public interest stand and at some of the sleepers that could have an impact on our lives.  Then, for the first time since he became governor, Nathan Deal says the state coffers have enough cash to fully fund schools across the state and his budget includes the money to do it.

(AP Photo/Joe Marquette)

Three former presidents were among the guests Tuesday at a memorial service for former Georgia Governor and U.S. Senator Zell Miller.  GPB carried the service live with commentary from GPB’s Bill Nigut, AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway and former WSB-TV anchor John Pruitt.

Olivia Reingold

On this edition of Political Rewind, we look at the impact of a big weekend of news.  Hundreds of thousands of students across the country march, including in Atlanta, in support of gun safety measures.  Plus, there are only two days left in the 2018 legislative session.  We’ll look at the key measures that remain undecided.  Then, porn star Stormy Daniels speaks out about her relationship with Donald Trump and about the effort to keep it out of public view.  Will her story have an impact on the Trump Presidency? 

Panelists:

Normally when you think of cherry blossoms, you think of Washington D.C. or Japan. But unbeknownst to a lot of tourists, Macon, Georgia is the Cherry Blossom Capital of the World. William A. Fickling Sr. discovered the distinctive blooms in his backyard in 1949.

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