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This week, the National Football League teamed up with Morehouse College in Atlanta for a workshop on activism. The workshop is designed to equip athletes with the tools and resources needed to make social change in respective and responsible ways.  Fifty years ago this year, two Olympic athletes brought their own type of activism to the national stage. Track stars Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in a Black Power salute during the ceremony. Both were honored at the White House in 2016 by then-President Barack Obama.

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This year marks the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth. Bernstein, a legendary composer, educator, and humanitarian, was born in August 25, 1918. To celebrate this milestone, orchestras and theatres around the world are preforming his vast range of work.

Emily Cureton

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with former Georgia Congressman Jack Kingston.  He's making national headlines for comments calling into question the motives of students mobilizing for gun reform.  Also, as President Trump takes his first steps to improve gun safety, a very large group rallies at the Georgia State Capitol calling for gun control.  Plus, Republican leaders at the State Capitol reach an agreement to cut taxes on Georgians by half a billion dollars in the next five years.  What led to them to act now, despite initial concerns from the governor?  And, a bill to all

(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the Florida shooting tragedy continues to dominate headlines, Georgia educators, parents and students are accessing the vulnerability of schools here.  But at the legislature, there’s little momentum toward passing new gun safety measures.  Meanwhile, President Trump blames the FBI for being too busy investigating Russia collusion to follow up on tips that the Florida shooter was a time bomb waiting to explode.  Then, as the legislature has moved past the halfway point of the session, our panel weighs in on the status of major bills today.  Plus, Robe

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On this edition of Political Rewind, the U.S. Senate shoots down Senator David Perdue’s plan to dramatically curtail legal immigration and it fails to find common ground on any immigration reform measure.  

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On this episode of “Two Way Street,” we’re reairing our conversion with Country legend, Bill Anderson.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

On this edition of Political Rewind, three Georgians take center stage in controversies now swirling on Capitol Hill.  FBI Director Chris Wray contradicts the White House story on when administration officials learned that Rob Porter was suspected of abusing his two former wives.  Will Chief of State John Kelly get the boot over concerns about what he knew and when?  Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue faces fire for a proposal to substitute food stamps for government-selected food boxes, but what's really behind the idea?  Also, David Perdue is in the spotlight as he pushes his plan to curt

On this edition of Political Rewind, to bring high speed internet to rural Georgia, legislators are looking at a broad range of taxes on services every Georgian uses, from streaming services to media downloads, even to satellite TV services.  Will the proposal fly in an election year?  Also, legislators look to impose a stiffer tax on used car purchases while also looking to bring back a tax break for electric vehicles.  As the legislative session unfolds, two GOP candidates for governor are dueling over a proposal to eliminate the state income tax. 

Panelists:

On this edition of Political Rewind, we take the show on the road to Savannah, thanks to an invitation from the League of Women Voters of Coastal Georgia.  Before a live audience, our panelists discussed news and issues in the Savannah area that have statewide implications.  Should the Talmadge name be stripped off the bridge that crosses over the gateway to the ever-growing Port of Savannah?  How do residents and local officials feel about the possibility of oil drilling just offshore?  We also talk about how funding is doled out for transportation issues facing the state as well as the fu

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Macon’s Target store is closed. When Target announced it was closing a dozen stores across the country, people in Macon were disappointed to learn the Presidential Parkway store on the was on the list.

If there was an upshot, it was the going out of business sale. That’s how Robert and Mikieoel Revels loaded up with the children’s clothes they had when they left the store a few weeks before it closed with their son Noah. Though they were happy for the bargains, Robert Revels said he wasn’t happy to lose the store.

What’s your idea of quality time? Author David Giffels has an unusual answer to that. He enlisted his father to help him build his own coffin. That project is the subject of David’s new book, “Furnishing Eternity: a Father, a Son, a Coffin, and a Measure of Life.

Georgia could make it more difficult for underage girls to get an abortion. Legislation filed in the Georgia state Senate would require underage girls to justify why they should be allowed to avoid notifying a parent or guardian if they are getting an abortion. At the federal level, President Trump has vowed to see the Roe v. Wade decision overturned. We move away from the political side the abortion debate, and focus on the science. For that, we talked with Didi Saint Louis, an Atlanta-based physician for reproductive health.

(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

The rules embedded in the new federal tax law could mean many Georgians will pay higher state income tax.  State legislators want to find a way to give that money back.  Will they succeed?  Also, a new report confirms what Atlantans already know—the city has some of the worst traffic in the world.  Does that add urgency to the new push in the legislature for expanding transit?  Plus, a spokesman for Casey Cagle has an interesting response to a second GOP gubernatorial candidate using Cagle’s likeness in a campaign ad.

Panelists:

Katie Atkinson / Center for Collaborative Journalism

An annual speech at a Georgia university that usually occurs with little fanfare is attracting controversy this year.

 

Mercer University's Founder’s Day address will be delivered by alumni Jay Sekulow on Feb. 6. Sekulow is a member of President Donald Trump’s legal team and a prominent figure in the conservative Christian community.

His selection is not sitting well with some students and faculty.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult? We ask these questions with Elena Parent, state Senator for Decatur.

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia primary elections are three months away, but already candidates for governor have amassed $10 million, and one GOP candidate spends a chunk of his case on a Super Bowl ad.  We’ll look at the latest fundraising totals.  Then, the possibility of another government shutdown looks later this week.  Can the White House and Congress reach a deal on immigration before then or will they once again kick the government spending authorization can down the road?  Plus, President Trump insists the Devin Nunes memo proves the Mueller Investigation is a fraud. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

The University of North Carolina Press

On this episode of "Two Way Street," we’re separating fact from fiction about the Gullah people. Our guest is Rutgers University History Professor, Melissa Cooper, author of "Making Gullah:  A History of Sapelo Islanders, Race, and the American Imagination."

Courtesy of Raed Mansour / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

On this edition of Political Rewind, another Georgian resigns from a high-level position in the Trump Administration.  We’ll discuss why the head of the CDC is out.  Also, Georgians respond to President Trump’s State of the Union speech.  Plus, we’ll look at news from the governor’s race: Stacey Evans wins a big endorsement and GOP candidates look to show fundraising muscle to compete with Casey Cagle as they face today’s disclosure deadline.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

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