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Host Bill Nigut reads one of the most beloved of all holiday stories: Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory.” In this heart-warming memoir, Capote recounts the Christmases he spent with an elderly, distant cousin when he was a young boy living in Monroeville, Alabama.

Grant Blankenship / GPB


Georgia Power’s expansion of nuclear power at Plant Vogtle is still alive following a unanimous vote by the state’s Public Service Commission.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the Public Service Commission is about to make a momentous decision that will hit Georgia Power customers in the pocketbook and influence the future of nuclear power across the country. Will the PSC uphold Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction of the troubled Plant Vogtle? Will the commission approve a power company proposal to increase the surcharge customers are already paying for building the nuclear plant? Plus, we’ll look at the fallout from the blackout at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.

Georgia educators are filing a class-action lawsuit against the state over retirement benefits. The state Department of Community Health changed a law in 2012, effectively reducing the subsidies of any retirees who were in the school system for less than five years. We talk about the controversy with James Salzer, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

#MeToo is not only a movement about sexual harassment. It’s a reckoning for the way we work, and a call to change the power dynamics leading to sexual abuse. We talk with people who dedicate, in different ways, their professional lives to understanding toxic work environments and how to dismantle them. Erica Clemmons is the Georgia State Director for 9 to 5; Marie Mitchell is a professor of management at the University of Georgia’s business school; and Joey Price is the CEO of Jumpstart HR, a human resources consulting firm based in Baltimore.

AP Photo/John Bazemore

On this edition of Political Rewind: Georgia political leaders are examining the results of the Alabama senate race to determine whether there are lessons for how to run in 2018 races here. Our panel will look at what Alabama may teach us about elections next year.

The list of nicknames and titles for filmmaker John Waters is long and legend. Waters is more than a filmmaker. He’s an actor, writer, fashion icon, stand-up comedian and art collector. He performs in Atlanta on Friday with his one-man show, “A John Waters Christmas.” We get his take on the holiday season.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

On today's episode of “Two Way Street,” we talk to Sugarland artist Kristian Bush. He and his musical partner, Jennifer Nettles, have been on hiatus since 2013 but recently announced that they will be getting back together for a 2018 tour. We talk to him about Sugarland’s long-anticipated reunion, but since this is a holiday show, we start by talking to Kristian about his passion for Christmas music.

On this edition of "Political Rewind," as the 2018 Georgia legislative session approaches, we’re joined by Speaker of the House of Representatives David Ralston. What does he see as the most compelling issues legislators will face? What about a plan to deal with sexual harassment under the Gold Dome? Will the speaker once again look to tamp down efforts to pass a religious liberty bill? And, what about the calls for the legislature to relinquish control over the fate of Confederate markers in local communities?


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s a city inside the City of Macon.

It’s made of tents strung along the banks of the Ocmulgee River downtown. Homeless people have been bedding down here, largely hidden from view, for years.

But this year, with the movement of people back to the nation’s downtown centers happening alongside the first increase in the nation’s homeless population in seven years, Macon-Bibb government says the tent city has to be pushed back, at least from inside Macon’s Central City Park.