Ways to Connect

Brynn Anderson / AP Photo/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the Alabama Senate race heads to the finish line, President Trump rallies voters to turn out for Roy Moore, while former President Obama, along with other key African-American leaders, rally in support of Doug Jones. Meanwhile, Alabama business leaders worry the election results could be yet another setback for the state’s efforts to compete with Georgia.

The Trump Administration’s immigration crackdown has led to an uptick in arrests nationwide. New federal data show arrests in Georgia and the Carolinas are also up from the last fiscal year. The president’s push to be tough on illegal immigration also includes policies to build a massive wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. Historian Kenneth C. Davis explains that anti-immigrant sentiment is older than America itself.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, two prominent Georgians push back against President Trump: FBI Director Chris Wray defends the honor of his agency in response to Trump's Twitter attacks, and Congressman John Lewis says he won't attend the opening of a Mississippi civil rights museum if Donald Trump shows up. Plus, will Al Franken's resignation from the U.S. Senate put more pressure on Republicans to speak out against those in their own party accused of sexual harassment? Georgia's own Newt Gingrich says no way.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Odds are good you have never heard of Emmett Miller. Not too long ago, neither had Ben Arthur.

Why Would Someone Rob A Dollar Store?

Dec 7, 2017
Mike Mozart / Flickr/CC

If you noticed a lot of dollar store robberies over the summer, you were onto something. Here in Macon, there was a string of armed robberies at stores like Family Dollar and Dollar Tree. But why would somebody target a dollar store?

We’re commemorating the 76th anniversary of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor this week by revisiting our conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Steve Twomey. His book “Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack” is out now in paperback.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Phillip Tutt talks about okra and collards with his neighbors. He’s lived in the same home on Macon, Georgia’s Bowden Street for close to 50 years. Most of that time he’s had a garden.

“Now for my turnips and things like that I don’t want to plant them before Labor Day,” he said. “But if I can get them in on Labor Day I’ll be happy. But collards I believe I set them out in August if I’m not mistaken.”

Over the years the rows of vegetables in his garden have thrived while the neighborhood around them has withered. There was a time when he would walk next door to share his peppers with neighbors and return with a basket of tomatoes.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Keisha Lance Bottoms declares victory in a mayor’s race decided by fewer than 800 votes, but Mary Norwood wants a recount. Could the results be overturned? We’ll also look at whether the results of special legislative elections suggest a shifting balance of power under the Gold Dome. Plus, our panel weighs in on President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, a move that may throw any chance for peace in the Middle East into chaos.


"Happy birthday!" to one of Georgia’s most iconic musicians. Little Richard was born in Macon on December 5, 1932. He grew up singing gospel in the Pentecostal church. His big break came in September of 1955, when he recorded “Tutti Fruitti.” His style influenced countless musicians, including Kate Pierson of the B-52s. She recently nominated “Tutti Fruitti” for our Georgia Playlist. We’ll hear why it tops her list of essential Georgia listening.

New FBI data show an uptick in reported hate crimes. Nationwide, 2016 saw more than 6,100 incidents, up by more than 270 from  the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period. But a recent ProPublica investigation finds many police departments, including those in Georgia, aren’t trained to identify and investigate hate crimes. This could lead to underreporting. We talk with ProPublica’s A.C. Thompson.