Macon

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Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Continuing disputes between the United States and Canada over lumber imports will not get in the way of a new factory announced Wednesday in Bibb County.  

 

Canada based Irving Consumer Products announced their intent to build a $400 million, 700,000 square foot plant  which will turn softwood lumber into toilet tissue in Macon. That will create 200 permanent jobs.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 


Allison Goldey says there’s one big question that makes her job hard.

“How do we even think about solving this problem without knowing what we have?” she asks.

As the head of the Macon-Bibb County Land Bank, Goldey is on the front lines of the $15 million blight remediation effort in the city. The Land Bank buys blighted houses, which the county then demolishes. The thing is, Macon-Bibb County can’t really say where its blighted housing is.

Are some of the Republican Party’s top stars beginning to pave the way to run for president in 2020 if Donald Trump steps aside? On today’s show we’ll talk about a New York Times report that Vice President Mike Pence, Ohio Governor John Kasich, and senators Tom Cotton and Ben Sasse are beginning to make the kind of moves that could position them to be ready for a run.  The story has infuriated the Vice President, who says it’s not true. But is it? Our panel weighs in.

Money And Kids

Aug 7, 2017

This month, Matt and Michael dive into the often controversial and challenging topic of "kids and money", not just the expense of having kids but teaching them the important issues associated with managing resources. Our hosts, found this topic actually required more than 30 minutes to discuss, so this is part one of two.

 

 

Georgia Congressman Austin Scott (R GA-08) wants to end a program that offers subsidized, low cost cell phones.

Scott introduced the End Taxpayer Funded Cell Phones Act in late July. It would end an Obama era program which provides basic smart phone service to people with low incomes for $9.25 a month.

Wikimedia Commons

Today on “Political Rewind,“ what comes next for the Plant Vogtle expansion? The $25 billion project has been in the works for years, but the builders – Westinghouse, a subsidiary of Toshiba – went bankrupt and future completion is questionable. Georgia Power customers have already paid additional fees for construction of the plant; what happens next? Public Service Commissioner Tim Echols joins us to discuss where we are and what it will take to move forward.

A Nashville great at the Cox Capitol Theatre, experimental pop at the Fresh Produce Music Hall a

Hussein Malla / AP Photo

This week on “Two Way Street,” Lawrence Wright joined us in front of a live audience at the Atlanta History Center to discuss his new book, ”The Terror Years: From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State.”

Alex Brandon / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” President Trump signs the Russian sanctions bill, but gripes that parts of it are "clearly unconstitutional." What are his reservations?

Crafting Group Hopes To 'Rock' Middle Georgia

Aug 2, 2017
Katie Atkinson / GPB News

Painted rocks are popping up all around Macon. They’re part of a community scavenger hunt. Over 2,000 Maconites are participating, including Julia Chambless and her twin boys.

They went to Central City Park last week so the twins could find the perfect hiding spot for their freshly painted rocks.

“They love to paint rocks, mix colors, the rocks end up being all types of colors,” Julia said. “They like to hide them all the time.  Every time we go somewhere...[they ask] ‘can we go hide rocks?’”

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

When students don’t come to open house, why not take open house on the road?

That’s what teachers at Hartley Elementary in Macon did the day before the first day of school this week when they piled onto a bus and toured the Hartley school zone.

Why do this? Principal Carmalita Dillard said, sure, a lot of kids missed open house, but there were other reasons.

“I want the teachers to be able to experience where our kids come from,” Dillard said.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” it's not over ‘til it's over. President Trump indicates he's not ready to let go of the health care issue and sends his OMB Director Mick Mulvaney out to say that Congress shouldn't even think about going home until they get something done. What happens next?

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

Don Smith / GPB

We hope you heard our broadcast from the Historic Douglass Theatre. We celebrated Macon’s musical talent with a live audience. Our opening act was the current generation of that talent – teens who completed this year’s Otis Music Camp for young musicians. Listen to the highlights on this post, or see the whole performance here

Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” the effort to repeal and replace Obamacare collapses in the wee hours, after Sen. John McCain delivers the coup de grace and votes NO. Was it payback for that campaign crack when Trump dissed McCain for having been captured during the Vietnam War? What does this legislative loss bode for Senate Leader Mitch McConnell? And is there a prayer that a return to bipartisanship may be borne of this event?

Don Smith / GPB

Macon, Georgia has a rich heritage, once home to great musicians like The Allman Brothers, Little Richard, and Otis Redding. The Douglass Theatre in Macon helped to launch the career of Redding and countless other musicians of color. In celebration of Bragg Jam, "On Second Thought" taps into that history, joined at the Douglass by local guests making strides in Macon.

Elena Seibert

This week on "Two Way Street," Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo joins us to discuss his latest book, "Trajectory: Stories." 

Jason Thrasher

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at Bragg Jam in Macon this weekend, July 28-29. The series is produced by GPB’s Trevor Young. Today’s picks come from Vanessa Briscoe Hay, former frontwoman for the legendary Athens band Pylon.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” President Trump does an about-face on an Obama-era ruling allowing transgender people to serve in the military.

Terrell Sandefur / flickr

This Thursday, July 27, we take our show on the road to the historic Douglass Theatre in downtown Macon. This theater was an important space during the 20th century for African-American artists.

Courtesy of Mike Savino

All this week we get additions to the essential Georgia Playlist from musicians playing at Bragg Jam in Macon this weekend, July 28-29. Today’s picks come from banjoist Mike Savino, also known as Tall Tall Trees. He’s performed with groups like Of Montreal and Kishi Bashi. He brings us music from Jerry Reid and R.E.M.

Tall Tall Trees' Bragg Jam performance will be at the Bearfoot Beer Garden this Saturday at 8:30 p.m.

drivebybiscuits1 / Foter

Wesleyan College in Macon is looking to apologize for past ties to racism, slavery, and the Ku Klux Klan. Information about the school’s history came to light recently through the research of students at Wesleyan. This comes just months after an incident involving racist graffiti on a dorm room wall.

From a casual distance, Gregg Allman's "My Only True Friend" might register as just another road song, the latest in a long line of slightly wistful, decidedly restless odes to the nomadic life.

 

 

When she was a kid, SaVana Cameron says she loved to sing.

“But I never did voice lessons or anything like that,” she said.

She didn’t get serious until her senior year of high school when she landed a solo in the musical "Annie."

“After I did the solo that night a lot of people came up to me and said ‘You have a really pretty voice,’” she said.

Miles Mashburn Is In On The Joke In Macon

Jul 24, 2017
Katie Atkinson / GPB News

 Macon native Miles Mashburn likes to poke fun at his hometown. In fact, he’s made a hobby out of it with his Macon Memes Facebook page.

 

“I’ve always liked making people laugh and particularly I love making memes on my personal Facebook,” Mashburn said. “So I decided to make the page 'Macon Memes' to kind of branch out and get a following and it turned out to be a pretty successful.”

 

True, if success is defined by having over 13,000 followers.

 

Katie Atkinson / GPB News

Kids sing and dance at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Macon. Later, they’ll go swimming or tour the local museum.  

This is no ordinary summer camp, it’s Freedom School. And these kids are here to read.

The original Freedom Schools provided free, alternate education for black students during the Civil Rights Movement. The Children’s Defense Fund re-imagined the program in 1995.

Today’s Freedom Schools exist in 29 states, including Georgia. The program expanded to Macon this year.

Ron Sachs / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner testifies in a closed-door session with the Senate Intelligence Committee. No reporters were allowed, but in a prepared statement, Kushner asserted that he has not colluded with Russians. We discuss today's events and his planned appearance tomorrow with House Intelligence Committee another closed-door session. At least one observer opines that Kushner managed to throw Donald Trump Jr. under the bus in his prepared remarks.

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP/Getty Images

Today on “Political Rewind,” the week ends with a bang! Sean Spicer, the long-beleaguered White House Press Secretary, abruptly resigns from his post. Was the appointment of Anthony Scaramucci as the new White House Communications Director the reason for Spicer quitting?

First, another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the hip-hop musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The early years for the Allman Brothers Band were spent in Macon in The Big House. It was a refuge and safe haven for artists to be creative.

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