OST

The Breakroom returns to discuss the art of gift giving and the recent special election in Alabama. We also talk about the biggest lies of the year, going to the moon, and bad grammar. Joining us this week are Steve Brown, Ed Sohn, Soumaya Khalifa, and Eric Segall.

Photographer Alison Wright has seen a lot of places. She’s trekked through Africa, to South America, to Asia, with many stops along the way: 150 countries in all. She has one goal: Documenting the human condition, one photograph at a time. Her new book, "Human Tribe," is a selection from those thousands of photographs, all showing our shared humanity.

Slate

If you’ve ever visited any Reddit message board or YouTube comment section, you know internet trolls and hate speech go hand in hand. A new study from Georgia Tech suggests the most effective way of combating internet hate speech is to eliminate the spaces where it occurs, not the trolls individually. We talk with Georgia Tech Assistant Professor Jacob Eisenstein.

Georgia’s Secretary of State is in charge of its voting system. And it’s an elected office. So the person who oversees fair elections, also runs as a candidate. Is this an inherent conflict of interest? Secretary of State Brian Kemp has been accused by some of using his position to help Republicans win elections. Now, Kemp is running in the Republican primary for governor. We talk with Robert Howard, Executive Director of the Southern Political Science Association.

ADULT SWIM

There is only one duo who can adventure through time and space, and still debate about political correctness...That is Rick Sanchez and Morty Smith, from Adult Swim’s animated hit "Rick and Morty." Rick is a genius scientist. His grandson Morty? Well--he’s in high school. Together, they use portal guns and other wacky inventions to save the multiverse from hyper-intelligent dogs and cannibal mantis-people. Show co-creator Dan Harmon sat down with Celeste Headlee recently to discuss the success of the show.

AllMusic

"Happy birthday!" to one of Georgia’s most iconic musicians. Little Richard was born in Macon on December 5, 1932. He grew up singing gospel in the Pentecostal church. His big break came in September of 1955, when he recorded “Tutti Fruitti.” His style influenced countless musicians, including Kate Pierson of the B-52s. She recently nominated “Tutti Fruitti” for our Georgia Playlist. We’ll hear why it tops her list of essential Georgia listening.

NPR

If you want to pass out meals to homeless people in Atlanta, you'll now need a permit. City police have begun enforcing a decades-old policy requiring one to distribute food to homeless people. Those who don't comply face fines. We sit down to discuss this policy with Deidre Oakley, Professor of Sociology at Georgia State University, and George Chidi, Social Impact Director for Central Atlanta Progress.

Tampa Bay Mizzou

UGA has a great football team this year. They’re ranked number seven in the nation, after a spell in first. But it’s not all good news. UGA ranks dead last in the Southeastern Conference when it comes to  graduation success rates for student athletes – all while the university’s overall student graduation rates are way up. Eric Kelderman is Senior Reporter for the Chronicle of Higher Education. Also with us is Professor of Sports Journalism at UGA, Vicki Michaelis.

Shutterstock.com

Behind many great recipes, you’ll find stories of immigration. That’s certainly the case in the kitchen of Pati Jinich. Her grandparents immigrated from Poland to Mexico. Now, Pati is a chef and cookbook author, renowned for her Jewish-Mexican fare. GPB’s Emily Cureton caught up with her last week while she was cooking at the General Muir restaurant in Atlanta.

Two new types of spiders have been found in Athens, Georgia. That’s bad news if you’re an arachnophobe, but great news if you’re an arachnologist. Bud Freeman is the Director of the Georgia Museum of Natural History. He and his team of fellow spider hunters are leading the search for new types of eight-legged creatures in the Southeast.

DC Pest Controll

Savannah attracts a whole lot of tourists. And, if you believe pest control experts at Terminix, an over-supply of rats. Terminix recently named Savannah the most rodent-infested city in America, overtaking Atlanta, which has seen its fair share of rodent woes. When Atlanta was still tops for rats, we invited Jason Chapman, vice-president of sales at Peachtree Pest Control to talk about why the city found itself home to so many rodents.

Tase and Tell

An exhibit at the University of Georgia highlights items from the state’s gold rush. Wright State Environmental History Professor Drew Swanson calls the era an ugly chapter of Georgia’s past, rife with environmental damage in the North Georgia mountains, and a driver of the forced eviction of Cherokee people. Drew Swanson joins us to talk about gold’s lasting legacy

Left Bank Books

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America,” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio. 

Flickr

Coal ash is a toxic substance. For years it was haphazardly dumped into rivers and ponds. Within the last 10 years or so, there has been a push to clean up the way coal ash is disposed. Georgia Power has vowed to close all its dump ponds. We talk with Chris Bowers, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. We also hear from Jen Hilburn of Altamaha Riverkeeper.

Reza Aslan

A new book by religious scholar Reza Aslan challenges some very old ideas about religion, and how we describe a higher power. The book is “God: A Human History.” It hits shelves this week, and Reza appears in Atlanta this Saturday as part of the Marcus Jewish Community Center’s Book Festival. He joined us live. 

Wikimedia

Republicans have long dominated Southern politics. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect, Randall Woodfin, who beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham. 

Emory.edu

Some 111 years ago, a brutal race riot broke out in Atlanta. A foreign observer wrote a novel about what he saw in 1906. A new translation of that work sheds light on the largely forgotten events. First published in German in 1922, “The Blue Stain,” tells the story of a German man whose trip abroad culminates in a violent version of Atlanta. Emory Professor of German Studies, Peter Hoyng joins us in studio to talk about finding and translating the novel. 

Savannah’s Owens-Thomas House was recently awarded $250,000 by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The money will continue renovations and reinterpretations of the property’s museum. We talk with Daina Berry, Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas. Berry has authored and edited a number of books on slavery in the South. We also talk to Leslie Harris, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Harris and Berry co-edited “Slavery and Freedom in Savannah.”

He might be Georgia’s second best known politician. And perhaps its most polarizing. Bestselling author Craig Shirley sits down with us to talk about his latest book, “Citizen Newt.” It follows the career of Newt Gingrich. Emory professor of History, Joe Crespino also joins us to help breakdown key moments of Gingrich's political life.

Animal Legal Defence Fund

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

Pixabay / Ben Reiss and Chris Ehlen

This week a group of scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their discoveries related to our circadian rhythms. Emory University professor Ben Reiss joined us in May to talk about his latest exploration of sleep patterns, “Wild Nights: How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World.” We revisit that conversation, then we’re joined in the studio by Assistant Professor of Neuroscience for Morehouse School of Medicine, Chris Ehlen.

Goldstar

Chicken is the most popular meat in America. And Georgia is the top chicken producer in the nation. Joining us is author, Maryn McKenna. Her book “Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats,” explores the role antibiotics play in transforming our food.