OST Full Show

Can we reverse climate change? Environmentalist and author Paul Hawken thinks so. He’s created a coalition of scientists and entrepreneurs. Project Drawdown aims to create 100 solutions to global warming. He talks about the effort in advance of an appearance at the Carter Center in Atlanta today, April 25.

Thousands of scientists plan to march on Washington this weekend. We look at how science is changing the world around us.

 

Before he was elected, President Trump called climate change a hoax. Now, he is rolling back policies meant to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Georges Benjamin says combating climate change is a public health issue. He’s the Executive Director of the American Public Health Association. He joined us with Peter Dykstra, the publisher of Environmental Health News.

Some of Hollywood’s greatest films were born right here in Georgia. We talked with the filmmakers behind two of these classics: "Fried Green Tomatoes" and "My Cousin Vinny."

Actor George Takei rose to fame at warp speed as Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. He’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. “Allegiance” is a play inspired by Takei’s experiences in an American Internment camp during World War II. George Takei visited the studio when the play hit theaters in Atlanta in February.

More than 100 Atlanta teachers have joined a federal age discrimination lawsuit. The complaint alleges teachers were forced out of their jobs by an administration that was openly hostile to employees over 40. Cheryl Patterson is one of the plaintiffs. She worked for years in the Atlanta Public School District, before she was laid off. Also with us is Charlotte Alexander. She’s an Assistant Professor specializing in employment law at Georgia State University.

The race to fill Tom Price’s congressional seat has attracted A LOT of candidates. Democrats hope all the attention will help flip the Sixth District from red to blue after a special election next Tuesday, April 18. We talk about the significance of the election’s outcome with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into World War I. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war. Since 1921, the artificial flower has been used to honor those who died, and it rose to prominence thanks to a former University of Georgia professor Moina Michael. She’s featured in the Atlanta History Center’s exhibit. We talk with Sue VerHoef, the center’s director of Oral History and Genealogy.

Plans to build two nuclear reactors at a Georgia power plant may be in jeopardy. That’s after the main contractor on the project at Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Tim Echols is a Georgia Public Service Commissioner. He joins us with Sue Sturgis of the online energy magazine, Facing South.

A special election is coming up in a week to fill Tom Price’s vacated seat in Georgia’s 6th Congressional district. The race is both contentious and expensive, by-products of the modern democratic process. We talked about our democracy and its health.

Centuries ago, Plato predicted that democracy is always doomed to fail. Was he right? We asked two political science experts: Robert Pirro of Georgia Southern University and Michael Evans of Georgia State University.

America was founded on principles of religious freedom. But Christianity dominates politics today. How this happened is the subject of a new book by Frances Fitzgerald. It’s called "The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America." In it, Frances Fitzgerald documents the rise and potential fall of America’s largest religious movement. She joins us to talk about the history and influence of evangelicalism.  

Early last week, a flock of chickens at a Northwest Georgia farm tested positive for bird flu. It’s the first confirmed contamination of commercial poultry in the state. What’s being done to contain the virus? How do farmers and officials prevent future outbreaks? We ask Mike Giles, President of the Georgia Poultry Foundation and Bruce Webster, UGA Professor of Poultry Science.

NASA announced last month it will recruit a team of Georgia Tech researchers for a new project. The team, called REVEALS, will study radiation on other planets and build radiation proof space suits. What can this technology do for us in space exploration? We ask the team leader, Thomas Orlando, a Director in the Center for Space Technology and Research at Georgia Tech.

The collapse last week of a portion of I-85 in Atlanta left the city in a state of gridlock and uncertainty. At a news conference on Monday, Georgia Department of Transportation officials told reporters work to repair the bridge won’t be finished until mid-June. For more on the I-85 disaster, we talk with GPB news reporter Sam Whitehead.  

Jon Benjamin has given a voice to the title character of the FX animated series “Archer” for seven seasons now. He’s also the voice of Bob on “Bob’s Burgers” and a featured comic actor in many more shows.  Benjamin joins us to talk about having one of the most recognizable voices in the world, his start as a stand-up comedian and the first time he was treated to a Southern gun range. 

Demonstrators marched to Turner Field over the weekend, the former home of the Atlanta Braves. They want millions of dollars from the stadium’s purchase by Georgia State University to go towards projects that will benefit current residents in the area. GPB’s Sean Powers spoke to supporters of the Turner Field Coalition about their demands. Then we hear about how redevelopment can make neighborhoods unaffordable, driving out long-time residents. Deirdre Oakley is a sociology professor at Georgia State University who specializes in gentrification issues.

Some people who flee war-torn countries get a chance to start fresh elsewhere. That’s the case for Nemr Abou Nassar. He was a young child when he left Lebanon for the U.S. with his family. Nemr is known as Lebanon's King of Comedy. We talk to him ahead of a performance this weekend at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.  

Happy, Sine Die! Thursday, March 30, marks the end of the legislative session at the Georgia State Capitol. GPB capitol reporter Lisa Rayam gives us a recap of which bills died, and which will proceed to the governor’s desk.

Sun Trust Park opens with an exhibition game this Friday. The road to a new home for the Atlanta Braves has been a long and expensive one. The estimated cost of the project is now more than $1 billion. We talk about the massive undertaking with GPB senior sports correspondent Jon Nelson.

Ghosts aren’t just people who were once alive. They can also be entire towns – thriving communities that now only exist in memory, historical documents or the remnants of old buildings. We learned more about some of these communities from Lisa Russell, author of the book, “Lost Towns of North Georgia.”

When a person dies, a part of them can remain with the living. That’s the case for one spirit in Savannah at the Sorrel Weed House Museum. We get a ghost story from the museum’s operation manager, Nicholas Wood.

Last month, two grocery stores shuttered in downtown Augusta. Both of them - a Whole Foods and a Kroger - cited a lack of customers as the reason. The Kroger was the only full-service store within a two-mile radius of downtown. These closures have made it much more difficult to find affordable, healthy food there. Joining us is the operator of a food pantry in Augusta, Christy Cunningham. She’s the Executive Director of  the Downtown Cooperative Church Ministries. We also speak with Garth Graham, Cardiologist and President of the Aetna Foundation.

In the last year, a nonprofit abortion and birth control clinic on the East Coast has expanded its presence in the South by opening two clinics in Georgia. The group is called Carafem, and it’s also trying to reduce the stigma around abortion through an aggressive media campaign. We talk with Melissa Grant, Carafem's vice president of health services.

It’s no secret young kids’ parents don’t get a lot of sleep. But new research shows living with children means less sleep for women than it does for men. Georgia Southern University assistant professor of epidemiology Kelly Sullivan is the author of this study. She joins us from our Savannah studio.

Over 15 million people in the United States deal with social anxiety disorder. SAD is an extreme fear  of being scrutinized and judged in social situations. For people who deal with social anxiety, it can be a paralyzing part of their everyday life. Georgia State psychology professor Page Anderson has developed a new technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. Her technology simulates real life settings and helps patients treat their anxiety virtually before confronting real-world situations.

Last week’s cold snap means bad news for fruit farmers in northern Georgia. The peach and blueberry industry will potentially lose millions of dollars to the late freeze. Some researchers at the University of Georgia have developed an equation which they say will help combat that loss. Joining us is one of those researchers--Pam Knox, an Agricultural Climatologist at the University of Georgia. Also joining us by phone is Joe Cornelius, Chair of the Georgia Blueberry Commission.

The FBI is investigating an alleged breach of voter data at Kennesaw State University. State officials learned earlier this month that more than seven million voter records from the KSU Center for Elections Systems may have been compromised. The University has made an initial statement, but no other comments have been made. With us to discuss this is Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

"Mr. Tuck & the 13 Heroes" is a new children's book about the first school in Henry County to desegregate black and white students. In 1966, Fairview Elementary accepted 13 students of color--an effort led by then principal, Brooks Tuck. The author of the book is John Harris, whose father was friends with Mr. Tuck. We talked with Harris, along with the illustrator, his daughter Sophie Harris.

As the race to fill Tom Price’s 6th District Congressional seat heats up, Democrats hope all that activity translates to votes in the special election next month. Jon Ossoff, 30, is encouraging Democrats with his “Make Trump Furious” campaign, and raising a considerable amount of grassroots support. We learn more about Ossoff’s campaign and the race ahead with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

It’s nearly spring. That means plants will begin to peek out of the soil again, insects return in force, and you might start to see more critters wandering around. On this show, we focus on Georgia’s wildlife from the bushy tailed variety that climb our trees, to the ancient shelled kind that swim off our shores.

Personal finance site WalletHub conducted a recent study rating the healthiest and unhealthiest cities in the country. According to the study, Augusta, Georgia is one of the unhealthiest cities in the nation. This is based on a number of factors, like the cost of a doctor visit, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fitness clubs per capita.

This is a live broadcast from Savannah for the Stopover Music Festival.

We start off the show with a conversation about shark fins. The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of these fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News. We also spoke with Lora Snyder, the Shark Campaign Director for the nonprofit group Oceana.

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