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First, Atlanta has a healthy appetite for improv. This week Dad’s Garage Theater welcomes Scott Adsit. You may know him best as Pete Hornberger on the show “30 Rock.” Scott joined us earlier this week to discuss the art of comedy.

Then, Atlanta-based producer Will Packer’s new movie “Girls Trip” is doing quite well. It cost about $19 million to make, and it’s grossed more than $90 million since opening in theaters last month. We talked with Will Packer last week about making hit movies with diverse casts, and his television project “Black America.”

First, rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend brought together many factions of the white supremacist movement, and put a younger generation of white supremacists in the spotlight. Reporter A.C. Thompson has been tracking hate groups for ProPublica’s “Documenting Hate” project. He joins us to talk about his reporting, and what he saw in Virginia. We also talk with University of Maryland psychology professor Arie Kruglanski, who studies the mental processes behind radicalization, de-radicalization, and terrorism.

First, a new report finds chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in 110 of 111 brains of deceased former NFL players. The study adds to a  growing body of knowledge about the connection between contact sports and brain-damaging concussions. We talk with Steve Broglio, Director of the NeuroTrauma Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan.

We also talk with former Atlanta Falcons linebacker Buddy Curry, who is working to improve football education with his group, “Kids & Pros.”

First, when Donald Trump began his campaign in 2015, few thought he would climb to the nation’s highest office. But Jared Yates Sexton realized Trump was onto something. He was one of the first people to attend and report on Trump rallies. Sexton teaches creative writing at Georgia Southern University, and has a new book: “The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore.” He joins us for an hour exploring changes in the American psyche.

First, if you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on TV’s “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and he has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. Audiences in Atlanta can see him live Friday, August 11, and tomorrow August 12 at Dad’s Garage. We talk with Colin Mochrie.

First, imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show is on the road this weekend [August 12] in Atlanta. We talk with series creator, Joel Hodgson.

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans.

The personal finance site Nerd Wallet says Atlanta is the nation’s best place for African-American-owned businesses. Savannah and Columbus scored high marks as well. We spoke with Cindy Yang from NerdWallet.

First, for years, we’ve seen gorillas come to life on the screen, in everything from “Planet of the Apes,” to “Congo,” and “The Jungle Book.” But these cinematic portrayals aren’t all that accurate. University of Georgia anthropology professor Roberta Salmi is on a mission to change Hollywood’s depiction of gorillas. We talk with her about studying their behavior, and working as a consultant on the new film, “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

First, August 7th marks 50 years since Jackson County DA Floyd Hoard was murdered. He was one of the first government prosecutors murdered in the line of the duty in the United States. The event changed the course of law enforcement and politics in Jackson County and led to then-Governor Maddox giving the Georgia Bureau of Investigation jurisdiction in Jackson County. Floyd Hoard's son, Richard Hoard, wrote a book about his father's murder a few years ago.

First, the average cost of college tuition has jumped by 77 percent over the last 10 years. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is collaborating with The Hechinger Report in New York to determine the consequences of rising student debt. The first in a series of investigative articles will roll out this Sunday. We talk to Meredith Kolodner, Staff Writer for The Hechinger Report.

First, as natural predators of insects, bats are extremely important to agriculture. Researchers estimate their value to farmers in the U.S. is roughly $23 billion per year, but these are tough times for bats. A malignant fungus known as "white-nose syndrome" has killed a lot of bats over the past 10 years. We talk about this menace with wildlife pathologist Heather Fenton of the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study and Georgia State University microbiologist Chris Cornelison.

First, Sweetwater Mission is Atlanta’s largest food pantry, and it focuses on the city’s undocumented workers. Managers at the mission say they recently turned down $35,000 of funding because it came with the stipulation that it should only be used to serve people who are in the country legally. Joining us is the Director of Operations for Sweetwater Mission, Mark Zangari, and Solveig Cunningham professor at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University.

First, the number of high-poverty neighborhoods in the metro Atlanta area tripled between 2000 and 2015. That’s according to a new Harvard study, which finds poverty is largely moving to the suburbs surrounding the city. We talk about this with Kim Addie, Senior Director of Health for United Way of Atlanta. Michael Rich, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University, also joins us.

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

First, a recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

First, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

First, the fate of the police department in the small town of Varnell in Whitfield County is suddenly uncertain. Earlier this month, the city council voted to eliminate the department because of costs, with little warning. The mayor ultimately vetoed that move, but the council could override that veto on Tuesday. We talk with reporter Chris Whitfield, who has been covering this story for The Daily Citizen in Dalton.

First, the Atlanta City Council, along with the United Way, has committed $50 million  to help combat homelessness. This comes after news that the city’s largest shelter, Peachtree-Pine, will close by the end of August. Joining us is Rick Westbrook, Executive Director for Lost N Found, and Deirdre Oakley, Professor of Sociology for Georgia State University.

First, another round of allegations have surfaced against musician R. Kelly. Now, parents have claimed their daughters are being held captive by the hip-hop musician, living in homes he rents out in Atlanta and Chicago, with almost every aspect of their lives controlled. R. Kelly publicly denies these allegations. Jim DeRogatis broke the story earlier this week. He’s a Buzzfeed contributor, host of WBEZ’s "Sound Opinions," and our guest.

We talk with actor Tony Hale, best known for roles on "Veep" and "Arrested Development." He stars in the movie, "Brave New Jersey." It’s showing at this week’s Macon Film Festival, July 20-23.

Then, 21 years have passed since Atlanta became an Olympic city. The games were transformative. For a look back, we re-visit a conversation we had with former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr and Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson.

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has exclusive new info on the situation. We talk with reporter Scott Trubey, who has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall.

Then, Kaleb Anderson is a 19 year-old-from Atlanta. He was diagnosed with HIV just a couple of months before starting college. He shares his story in a commentary.

A report released last month provides a grim picture on the effects of gun violence on children. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta found nearly 1,300 children in the United States die in shootings each year. That makes gunshot wounds the third leading cause of death for children up to the age of 17. We talk with Atlanta-based trauma surgeon Omar Danner, who worked on a separate report about the victims of gun violence admitted to Grady Hospital.

The Killer Tomato is this coming weekend. The Killer Tomato Festival, that is. Atlanta restaurateur and chef Ford Fry and Georgia Organics Director Alice Rolls join us to talk about southern cooking with juicy, ripe tomatoes. Then, Bitter Southerner editor-in-chief Chuck Reece provides his views on how to construct the perfect tomato sandwich.

First, last week, Georgia’s public health commissioner was named as the new head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention here in Atlanta. Brenda Fitzgerald was chosen by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, a former Georgia congressman. The last permanent director of the CDC was Tom Frieden, who was appointed by President Obama in 2009. We re-visit our conversation with Frieden, who talked about his work with the CDC, and what he hopes to see happen there in the future.

First, the battle for voter data is reaching a tipping point in Georgia. Last week, a lawsuit filed in Fulton County Superior Court seeks to overturn the results of the 6th District congressional election, alleging a voter data breach at an election center at Kennesaw State University influenced the outcome. And a new restraining order is looking to bar President Trump from obtaining voter information in Georgia. We talk about these issues with Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

A recent study by the Natural Resources Defense Council shows Georgia leads most states in drinking water violations. Most happen in rural areas. We talk about the findings with Erik Olson, the NRDC’s health program director.

Then, 40 years ago President Jimmy Carter posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Dr.  Martin Luther King, Jr. The civil rights icon had died about a decade earlier. Our producer Sean Powers takes us back to the day MLK was honored at the White House with this audio postcard.

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, alleging the company discriminates against older workers by not hiring them in the first place. This leaves in place a ruling from Atlanta’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. We discuss the implications with Paul Chichester, an Atlanta-based employment attorney. And Peter Gosselin, contributing reporter for ProPublica.

First, Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults. Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

In recent years, newspapers and magazines have moved to all digital formats. But one magazine in Georgia is making a print comeback. This year Decatur-based Paste Magazine started a quarterly magazine that looks and feels different. The second edition just came out. We learn more about the magazine’s reboot with founder and editor-in-chief, Josh Jackson.

First, the City of Atlanta plans to raise the minimum wage for city workers to $15 an hour. Following a national trend, Atlanta is the first such place in Georgia to make the move. But will a minimum wage increase hurt or help the working class? We talk about the pros and cons with Kristy Offitt, Employment Litigator for Ogletree Deakins in Atlanta. And Tom Smith, Assistant Professor of Finance at Emory University.

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