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First, President Trump recently unveiled new trade restrictions with Cuba. We look at how this will impact Georgia’s poultry industry. Joining us is James Sumner, President of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council and Marisa Anne Pagnattaro, Associate Dean for UGA’s Terry College of Business.

First, according to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses. We speak with Robyn McDougle of the Commonwealth Educational Policy Institute.

First, walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

First, retail stores are disappearing, but the economy’s not the bad guy. Rising pressure from online shopping is causing brick and mortar stores to file for bankruptcy at a record pace in 2017. We’ll talk about how this retail downturn is affecting Georgia with Amy Wenk, reporter for The Atlanta Business Chronicle, and John Brown, Associate Professor of Economics at Georgia Southern University.

Today, we revisit our conversation with musician Kishi Bashi. He was raised in Virginia, but has lived in Athens since 2011 when he started playing with the band Of Montreal. We spoke to him just before his concert at the Variety Playhouse last fall. He is up for "Best Album of the Year" at the Flagpole Music Awards tonight in Athens.

First, June 20 is World Refugee Day. The town of Clarkston, Georgia, is home to a large refugee population. It’s been called the Ellis Island of the South. We talked with Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry about how executive orders may impact the refugee community there. Then, two refugee friends from Syria share their stories. One of them arrived in Georgia right after 9/11, but before the Syrian civil war. The other is a young child, who came to the state last year. Besides calling Syria their birthplace, they share an even greater bond.

Up first, when you go into a hair salon or a cosmetics store, how much do you know about the products used on your skin or your hair? A recent study says there are dangerous chemicals in some of these products, particularly those marketed to black women. That study comes from the non-profit Environmental Working Group. Nneka Leiba is the group’s Deputy Director of Research.  She joins us with journalist A'Lelia Bundles and Atlanta hair stylist Latasha Gray.

One year ago, Atlanta-based Rapper Gucci Mane was released from prison. Since his release, he has been reinventing himself. He headlines a concert this weekend in Atlanta. We speak with Georgia-based hip-hop artist Makonnen and hip-hop scholar Regina Bradley about Gucci Mane’s influence on hip-hop in the South. Then, NPR Music hip-hop reporter Rodney Carmichael reviews Gucci Mane’s latest album, "Droptopwop."

As the race for a single congressional district draws national attention, we take an hour to examine Georgia’s changing electorate.

First, Cobb County is the last metro county in Georgia with a white majority. But it’s expected to become "majority minority"—more than 50 percent non-white residents—in the next four years. Politically, the reliably Republican county is shifting to largely Democratic, and may flip in the upcoming 6th Congressional District election. We talk about the changing electorate in Cobb with Andra Gillespie, Political Science Professor at Emory University.

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center. We talk about Atlanta’s flimsy historic preservation record with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center; and Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

This month marks two years since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a ban on gay marriage. The LGBT Institute at Atlanta's Center For Civil and Human Rights tells the stories of the gay rights movement. We hear from Executive Director Ryan Roemerman and board member Tim’m West.

On this episode, we discussed how thousands of Georgians were dropped from food stamp benefits this year – roughly 62 percent of the state’s recipients. The state told them they had an April 1 deadline to find a job, or lose their benefits. Melissa Johnson, Senior Policy Analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute; and Craig Schneider, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, joined us for that conversation.

 

Actress and writer Anna Vocino wears many hats. She’s appeared in side roles on shows like “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “The Office,” and has done voice-over work for numerous cartoons and video games. She’s also a passionate food writer, and blogs about her struggle with celiac disease. Her new book, “Eat Happy,” explores the ways to eat gluten-free, and have it taste good, too. We talk to her ahead of a book signing this Saturday, May 6.

Georgia’s system for deciding parole just changed for the first time in a decade. Last month, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles approved new guidelines for determining if inmates should get out of prison early. One of the changes is, a person’s prior arrest history, rather than just their conviction history, can color that decision. Adam Gelb is director of the Public Safety Performance Project with the Pew Charitable Trusts. Also joining us is Marissa McCall Dodson. She’s the public policy director with the Southern Center for Human Rights.

The Good Samaritan bill became Georgia law three years ago. The bill equips first responders with the drug Naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses, and gives amnesty to those who report drug related health emergencies. We talk about results of the law with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, and Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition Ambassador Mona Bennett.

Christian McBride is a master of jazz bass. The four-time Grammy Award winner has performed with Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, and many others. We talk with him ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on Saturday, April 29.

Can we reverse climate change? Environmentalist and author Paul Hawken thinks so. He’s created a coalition of scientists and entrepreneurs. Project Drawdown aims to create 100 solutions to global warming. He talks about the effort in advance of an appearance at the Carter Center in Atlanta today, April 25.

Thousands of scientists plan to march on Washington this weekend. We look at how science is changing the world around us.

 

Before he was elected, President Trump called climate change a hoax. Now, he is rolling back policies meant to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Georges Benjamin says combating climate change is a public health issue. He’s the Executive Director of the American Public Health Association. He joined us with Peter Dykstra, the publisher of Environmental Health News.

Some of Hollywood’s greatest films were born right here in Georgia. We talked with the filmmakers behind two of these classics: "Fried Green Tomatoes" and "My Cousin Vinny."

Actor George Takei rose to fame at warp speed as Sulu in the original "Star Trek" series. He’s since become an active voice in promoting equal rights for LGBT people. “Allegiance” is a play inspired by Takei’s experiences in an American Internment camp during World War II. George Takei visited the studio when the play hit theaters in Atlanta in February.

More than 100 Atlanta teachers have joined a federal age discrimination lawsuit. The complaint alleges teachers were forced out of their jobs by an administration that was openly hostile to employees over 40. Cheryl Patterson is one of the plaintiffs. She worked for years in the Atlanta Public School District, before she was laid off. Also with us is Charlotte Alexander. She’s an Assistant Professor specializing in employment law at Georgia State University.

The race to fill Tom Price’s congressional seat has attracted A LOT of candidates. Democrats hope all the attention will help flip the Sixth District from red to blue after a special election next Tuesday, April 18. We talk about the significance of the election’s outcome with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein and University of Georgia professor Audrey Haynes.

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into World War I. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war. Since 1921, the artificial flower has been used to honor those who died, and it rose to prominence thanks to a former University of Georgia professor Moina Michael. She’s featured in the Atlanta History Center’s exhibit. We talk with Sue VerHoef, the center’s director of Oral History and Genealogy.

Plans to build two nuclear reactors at a Georgia power plant may be in jeopardy. That’s after the main contractor on the project at Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Tim Echols is a Georgia Public Service Commissioner. He joins us with Sue Sturgis of the online energy magazine, Facing South.

A special election is coming up in a week to fill Tom Price’s vacated seat in Georgia’s 6th Congressional district. The race is both contentious and expensive, by-products of the modern democratic process. We talked about our democracy and its health.

Centuries ago, Plato predicted that democracy is always doomed to fail. Was he right? We asked two political science experts: Robert Pirro of Georgia Southern University and Michael Evans of Georgia State University.

America was founded on principles of religious freedom. But Christianity dominates politics today. How this happened is the subject of a new book by Frances Fitzgerald. It’s called "The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America." In it, Frances Fitzgerald documents the rise and potential fall of America’s largest religious movement. She joins us to talk about the history and influence of evangelicalism.  

Early last week, a flock of chickens at a Northwest Georgia farm tested positive for bird flu. It’s the first confirmed contamination of commercial poultry in the state. What’s being done to contain the virus? How do farmers and officials prevent future outbreaks? We ask Mike Giles, President of the Georgia Poultry Foundation and Bruce Webster, UGA Professor of Poultry Science.

NASA announced last month it will recruit a team of Georgia Tech researchers for a new project. The team, called REVEALS, will study radiation on other planets and build radiation proof space suits. What can this technology do for us in space exploration? We ask the team leader, Thomas Orlando, a Director in the Center for Space Technology and Research at Georgia Tech.

The collapse last week of a portion of I-85 in Atlanta left the city in a state of gridlock and uncertainty. At a news conference on Monday, Georgia Department of Transportation officials told reporters work to repair the bridge won’t be finished until mid-June. For more on the I-85 disaster, we talk with GPB news reporter Sam Whitehead.  

Jon Benjamin has given a voice to the title character of the FX animated series “Archer” for seven seasons now. He’s also the voice of Bob on “Bob’s Burgers” and a featured comic actor in many more shows.  Benjamin joins us to talk about having one of the most recognizable voices in the world, his start as a stand-up comedian and the first time he was treated to a Southern gun range. 

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