Just when it seems Atlanta's done all it can to decimate rap's beloved traditions, someone hops out of bounds again, crosses another line, slaughters a sacred cow.

The Southern dialect is a complex thing, especially when pouring out the mouths of three of the regions best rappers ever. From the marble-mouthed flow of trapper du jour Gucci Mane, to the elongated vowel sounds of the dearly departed Pimp C, to the sticky, multi-syllabic delivery of OutKast's most consistent player Big Boi, it comes in all drawls and colors.

When the story of Atlanta's turn-of-the-millennium sonic boom is told 100 years from now, Organized Noize — the production trio of Ray Murray, Sleepy Brown and Rico Wade — will be the sound architects credited with putting the Dirty South on the map.

Culture Wars

Mar 15, 2017
Illustration: Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Georgia Institute of Technology is known for graduating its students from nationally-ranked programs in science, technology, engineering and math.

A new class taught by visiting professor Dr. Joyce Wilson is using hip-hop to take those students down a more creative pathway than their STEM studies to learn about issues such as race, poverty and cultural identity.

The class is titled “Exploring the Lyrics of OutKast and Trap Music to Explore Politics of Social Justice.”

Dr. Wilson joined me in the studio to explain why she’s teaching trap at Tech.

The DePaulia / flickr

A class at Armstrong State University in Savannah teaches students about the music of OutKast. As part of our Lessons from Left Field series, we talk with professor Regina Bradley and two of her students: Anthony Scott and Gabby Nichols.


Georgia Playlist: Anthony Aparo

Jan 6, 2017
Jonathan Splitlog

Atlanta-based songwriter Anthony Aparo is best known as the front man for the band Culture Culture and a performer for the local collaboration ATL Collective. Anthony is featured in an upcoming GPB Music Session, and gave us two more tunes for our essential Georgia Playlist. Picks include songs by OutKast and Drivin’ n Cryin’. 

A3C: You Can Find Me In The A!

Oct 3, 2016
Jack Kennard / jackkennard.com

Atlanta rappers are never hesitant to shout out their neighborhoods and favorite spots around town. Write what you know, "rep where ya stay."

Wiki Commons

"Outkast and Goodie Mob are sincerely detailing what they hear the community discuss," said Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson. He is the author of the forthcoming book, "The Legend of the Black Mecca: Myth, Maxim, and the Making of an Olympic City."

He shares how Outkast's single "Git Up, Git Out" from their debut album "Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik" offers a window into how Atlanta's African American community responded to the changes from the 1996 Summer Olympic Games.