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Since its passage in the wake of 9/11, the Patriot Act has become a symbol to civil liberties activists for any law which invades personal freedoms in the name of preventing terrorism. But a new law which went into effect on July 1 has Georgia’s branch of the American Civil Liberties Union saying it’s even broader than the Patriot Act.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're more than a week past the moment when Trump became the president-elect, and the news is still bringing people out into the streets. NPR's Sam Sanders has been asking protesters what drives them.

Police shootings of unarmed African American men have sparked protests across the country, including in Atlanta. The protests in the city have been peaceful for the most part. But recent violence against police in Baton Rouge and Dallas have raised questions about the capacity of law enforcement officers to serve as both public servants and defenders of the peace. We talk with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution columnist Bill Torpy about why he thinks the way officers handle protests in Atlanta work. 

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 Jim Alexander has done a lot of things.

 

At one time or another he has been a bookstore owner, the general manager of a newspaper delivery service and a car detailer. He ran a pool room, taught horseback riding and was a diesel engine mechanic in the Navy.

“So in my life I’ve done things,” he said

But what really defines Alexander are his camera and his activism.