protest

GPB News / Emily Cureton

In April three dozen members of a neo-Nazi group rallied in Newnan,  south of Atlanta. Hundreds showed up to counter protest. Police report no one was injured, but the day raised questions about who pays for free speech when it endangers public safety.  Local governments spent more than $200,000 to keep the peace.


GPB News / Emily Cureton

Last month three dozen members of a neo-nazi group rallied in Newnan, south of Atlanta. Hundreds of people showed up to protest. The City of Newnan and Coweta County governments spent $212,000 dollars to keep the peace.
 

About 700 police officers worked overtime.  It cost the city $3,600 just to feed them all for the day, while streets were closed with rented barricades and helicopters circled the sky.  No one was injured, despite fears of violent clashes like what erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia last year.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Around 700 law enforcement officers transformed a Georgia town into a militarized zone Saturday, after the city of Newnan approved letting members of a white supremacist group demonstrate at a public park, sparking counter protests.

@PBS

Sports has long been known as the great unifier. But in the NFL, this season feels different.  

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Hundreds marched through Atlanta Sunday night, in a second day of protests against deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Some protesters also defaced a monument with ties to the Confederacy.

Branden Camp / AP Photo

Since its passage in the wake of 9/11, the Patriot Act has become a symbol to civil liberties activists for any law which invades personal freedoms in the name of preventing terrorism. But a new law which went into effect on July 1 has Georgia’s branch of the American Civil Liberties Union saying it’s even broader than the Patriot Act.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're more than a week past the moment when Trump became the president-elect, and the news is still bringing people out into the streets. NPR's Sam Sanders has been asking protesters what drives them.

Police shootings of unarmed African American men have sparked protests across the country, including in Atlanta. The protests in the city have been peaceful for the most part. But recent violence against police in Baton Rouge and Dallas have raised questions about the capacity of law enforcement officers to serve as both public servants and defenders of the peace. We talk with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution columnist Bill Torpy about why he thinks the way officers handle protests in Atlanta work. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 Jim Alexander has done a lot of things.

 

At one time or another he has been a bookstore owner, the general manager of a newspaper delivery service and a car detailer. He ran a pool room, taught horseback riding and was a diesel engine mechanic in the Navy.

“So in my life I’ve done things,” he said

But what really defines Alexander are his camera and his activism.