race

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Odds are good you have never heard of Emmett Miller. Not too long ago, neither had Ben Arthur.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

For generations, Atlanta has been known unofficially as the black capital of America. In 1971, Ebony magazine called Atlanta the "black mecca of the South." We talked with Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson, who challenges that notion in his new book.

How To Talk To Your Kids About Police Interactions

Oct 23, 2017
Maya Martin / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Earlier this month, Vice President Mike Pence left an Indianapolis Colts game to protest players kneeling during the national anthem. It’s something athletes across the country, including Atlanta, are doing on the field to protest police violence against African-Americans. Ameer Mohammed of Atlanta says he wants his own experiences with police to be a learning experience for his children.

Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says respect for law enforcement is the key to safer communities.

 

He delivered that message to the annual gathering of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives in Atlanta Tuesday.

“We can all agree that you’re safer on your rounds when everyone respects law enforcement. The communities you serve are safer if people respect law enforcement,” Sessions said.

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center. We talk about Atlanta’s flimsy historic preservation record with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center; and Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Shayna Waltower / Center for Collaborative Journalism

Schools in Macon-Bibb have largely re-segregated along racial lines. One quarter of all white students in the county go to a single charter school. These facts and others are what we are asking you to talk to us about in a project with our partners at the The Macon Telegraph and the Center for Collaborative Journalism. Hear what a few people had to say in this video from our first conversation and then come join us Thursday, Jan. 26 at 6 p.m. at the Museum of Arts and Sciences for the second discussion.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

PATRICKPHILLIPS

In 1912, more than 1,000 black citizens were driven out of Forsyth County. Large tracts of land were seized and families were threatened with violence if they did not cooperate. Poet and author Patrick Phillips grew up in Forsyth County and documented the area’s complicated racial heritage in his new book, "Blood at the Root."

He joins us to talk about the racial climate in Forsyth and the issues that persist to this day. 

TED

Frequent listeners of NPR’s "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!" may know of Maz Jobrani. He's an Iranian-American comedian and actor, and a frequent panelist on the show. Jobrani says comedians can play an important role in challenging stereotypes. He’s been doing it for years.  We caught up with him ahead of a series of performances this week at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.

Emily Jones / GPB News

You might not guess it from old Westerns, but many of the bull riders and cattle ropers of the world are people of color. African-Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans played a key role in the settlement of the American West and the development of rodeo. 

Today, special rodeos in Georgia and around the country highlight that history – and aim to bring new fans of color into the sport.

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A recent report from the Associated Press has revealed that a staggering number of law enforcement agencies across the country have failed to report data concerning hate crimes. 2,700 agencies reported no hate crimes between 2009-2014.  Here in Georgia, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties were missing years’ worth of data. 

We sit down with AP reporter Christina A. Cassidy to talk about her report, how law enforcement handles hate-based incidents and what exactly constitutes a hate crime.

TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL

Has a television show ever had a profound impact on you? Well, one young man in Georgia had a transformative experience at a recent screening of the History Channel miniseries "Roots."  Jason Crichton, 15, of Atlanta attends Therrell High School.

Professor Raymond Gavins passed away last week, at the age of 77,  leaving behind a powerful legacy from his time as a historian at Duke University. The Atlanta native helped build an audio treasure trove of previously unheard African-American voices from the era of legalized segregation.  The collection is known as the "Behind the Veil Project."

We take a moment to eulogize Gavins and remember the arduous journey he took in order to better his fellow man. 

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Last year, the Department of Justice came down hard on the Georgia school system after they learned about the segregation and isolation of disabled students into special "psycho-educational programs." But now, another investigation into these special programs has revealed that a disproportionate amount of black students are sent to these facilities. New reporting reveals that students are offered little or no psychiatric help and spend much of the day either playing games or sitting in isolation.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A string of small arsons and racist graffiti at Mercer University in Macon are distracting students at the end of the semester when they would otherwise be worried about finals.

The graffiti was both written and removed Wednesday night on doors in Sherwood Hall, a co-ed freshman dormitory.  Freshman finance and accounting major Kenny Olaganju didn’t see the graffiti before it was removed, but he heard about it.

“All that I heard is that someone went through on the first floor and wrote the N-word with a hard R on peoples’ doors,” he said

Grant Blankenship / Georgia Public Broadcasting

For Southerners who have lived and struggled with the issue of race all their lives, it can be tough to see it with fresh eyes.

Sometimes you need an outsider. When it comes to race in one Southern city, Macon, Ga.,  playwright Mark Mobley is just that.

The play “What Color Is Your Brother?” is the product of Mobley taking his outsider's view into conversations with Macon locals on the issue of race. The project grew out of Mobley's longtime friendship with a Macon native, renown violinist Robert McDuffie.