Julie Lythcott-Haims is the seventh generation of her family to grow up in the United States.  And yet, she is still asked, over and over: “Where are you really from?” She responds eloquently in her new memoir: “Real American.”

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Odds are good you have never heard of Emmett Miller. Not too long ago, neither had Ben Arthur.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

For generations, Atlanta has been known unofficially as the black capital of America. In 1971, Ebony magazine called Atlanta the "black mecca of the South." We talked with Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson, who challenges that notion in his new book.

How To Talk To Your Kids About Police Interactions

Oct 23, 2017
Maya Martin / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Earlier this month, Vice President Mike Pence left an Indianapolis Colts game to protest players kneeling during the national anthem. It’s something athletes across the country, including Atlanta, are doing on the field to protest police violence against African-Americans. Ameer Mohammed of Atlanta says he wants his own experiences with police to be a learning experience for his children.

Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says respect for law enforcement is the key to safer communities.


He delivered that message to the annual gathering of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives in Atlanta Tuesday.

“We can all agree that you’re safer on your rounds when everyone respects law enforcement. The communities you serve are safer if people respect law enforcement,” Sessions said.

On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Jun 14, 2017

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center. We talk about Atlanta’s flimsy historic preservation record with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center; and Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Shayna Waltower / Center for Collaborative Journalism

Schools in Macon-Bibb have largely re-segregated along racial lines. One quarter of all white students in the county go to a single charter school. These facts and others are what we are asking you to talk to us about in a project with our partners at the The Macon Telegraph and the Center for Collaborative Journalism. Hear what a few people had to say in this video from our first conversation and then come join us Thursday, Jan. 26 at 6 p.m. at the Museum of Arts and Sciences for the second discussion.

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In 1912, more than 1,000 black citizens were driven out of Forsyth County. Large tracts of land were seized and families were threatened with violence if they did not cooperate. Poet and author Patrick Phillips grew up in Forsyth County and documented the area’s complicated racial heritage in his new book, "Blood at the Root."

He joins us to talk about the racial climate in Forsyth and the issues that persist to this day. 


Frequent listeners of NPR’s "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!" may know of Maz Jobrani. He's an Iranian-American comedian and actor, and a frequent panelist on the show. Jobrani says comedians can play an important role in challenging stereotypes. He’s been doing it for years.  We caught up with him ahead of a series of performances this week at the Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta.