Richard Nixon

Harry Obst, who worked as a German interpreter for seven U.S. presidents through Bill Clinton, says he can only remember one who ever dispensed with an interpreter during discussions with a foreign leader: Richard Nixon.

It was a bad idea for lots of reasons, the author of White House Interpreter: The Art of Interpretation tells NPR.

Charles Tasnadi / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” we take a deep dive into the summer of ’72 and the botched burglary that eventually toppled a president. Bill Nigut and the AJC’s Jim Galloway spend the full hour with Richard Ben-Veniste, chief of the special prosecutor’s Watergate Task Force.

Until now, all the controversy over President Trump, his associates and their various connections with various Russians has been billows of smoke without a visible fire.

Donald Trump wasn't the first president to think the mainstream media was "fake news" — and determined to do something about it.

In 1939, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was irritated with reporting on a leaked conversation between himself and senators that portrayed his position toward the emerging threat of Germany as "the American frontier is on the Rhine." In other words, FDR appeared to be pledging — in private — not to allow Germany to get far beyond its borders, thereby making it likely he would commit America to war.

Kathy Kupka / Doubleday

Today on “Political Rewind,” a flashback to America's 37th president, Richard Milhous Nixon, one of the most fascinating characters to ever take the Oval Office.