Rickey Bevington

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This summer during All Things Considered on 88.5 FM in Atlanta host Rickey Bevington is telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting place names. 

We’re calling the project “What’s In A Name?

Today, we look at the Tom Moreland Interchange, more commonly known as Spaghetti Junction.


Wikimedia Commons

This summer on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

Host Rickey Bevington takes your submissions and then brings you the history behind the places Atlantans call home.

We're calling it “What’s In A Name?


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This summer on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

Host Rickey Bevington takes your submissions and then brings you the history behind the places Atlantans call home.

We’re calling the project “What’s In A Name?

Today's comes from my Georgia Public Broadcasting colleague Virginia Prescott who asks about the Blandtown neighborhood just west of Atlantic Station.


The Atlanta neighborhood of Buckhead was named after a dead deer. African-American families in the early 20th century picked "Just Us" to call their new neighborhood south of downtown. The developer of Wieuca Road named it after his three daughters: Wilma, Eugenia, Catherine - Wi-eu-ca (pronounced WHY-yoo-cuh).

All summer long here on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

We’re calling it “What’s In A Name?”

Isabeth Mendoza, GPB News

More than 700 people visited Monday Night Garage on Friday, March 9 for a special live broadcast of NPR All Things Considered with host Rickey Bevington.

The show was all about the state's alcohol culture: From Georgia's founding as a dry colony to the modern-day discussions of cocktails at brunch, we've got you covered.

TEDxPeachtree

What’s the right way to report the news?

That’s a debate people across the globe are having right now as we grapple with partisan bias in news, propaganda masking as news, government attacks on journalists and a general sense of “we don’t know who to trust.”

Maura Currie / GPB News

This week’s implosion of the Georgia Dome rounds out what has been a historic year for Atlanta sports.

2017 will go down as the year when the Falcons logged the most embarrassing loss in Super Bowl history; the Falcons and the Atlanta Braves opened new stadiums; and Atlantans embraced the city’s first Major League Soccer club.

The man behind almost all of this is Arthur Blank.

The board of credit reporting company Equifax says CEO Richard Smith will retire, effective immediately. His departure comes after hackers stole personal data on millions of Americans.

In a statement, Smith says he believes it’s in the company’s best interest to have new leadership.

Paulino Barros, who leads Equifax’s Asia-Pacific division, will take over as interim CEO. Smith will stay on as an unpaid advisor.

Goshen Brewing Company

Starting Friday, Sept. 1, Georgians won’t need to take a tour to sample alcohol at their favorite brewery. They’ll also be able to take some home with them.

The new law, SB 85, breaks the strict alcohol system put into place after Prohibition.

Attorney Charlie Suessmith explains why Georgia has so tightly regulated alcohol for nearly a century. 

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Opioids are a $10 billion industry for pharmaceutical companies. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from 1999 to 2014, more than 165,000 persons died from overdose related to opioid pain medication in the United States. Today, thousands more are struggling with drug dependency that started with opioids given to them by doctors.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

For this edition of Atlanta Considered, I went to Chrome Yellow Trading Company on Edgewood Avenue during the A3C hip-hop festival and conference.

A3C is one of the nation’s largest urban music events and stands for All Three Coasts, as Atlanta joins New York and Los Angeles as the pillars of hip-hop culture.

 

Stephen Fowler / GPB

Atlanta may see a first: Tonight thousands of people may come to a candlelight vigil for a grocery store. "Murder Kroger" as it's known closes its door tomorrow, October 28 after serving Ponce de Leon Avenue for three decades. GPB's Stephen Fowler was live at "Murder Kroger" in the shadow of Ponce City Market. 

Rickey Bevington: So let's begin with why many Atlantans call this supermarket "Murder Kroger." 

Photo Rickey Bevington

Southwest Georgia’s phantasmagorical homestead known as Pasaquan opens to the public Saturday after a two-year, multi-million dollar restoration.

The seven acre site is the life’s work of eccentric artist Eddie Owens Martin.

Pasaquan is hard to describe. You pull off a flat, tree-lined road down a gravel driveway and the first thing you see is a tall pagoda and long, high wall covered with brightly colored designs.

“Dope,” is the first reaction from University of Georgia art graduate student Katherine Miller.

Thirty thousand people are expected to attend the 2016 A3C hip hop festival and conference Oct. 5-9 in Atlanta.

One of the industry's most prominent women executives is Atlanta native Shanti Das.

Das launched her career in the early 1990’s with Atlanta-based LaFace Records promoting local artists including OutKast, Goodie Mob, Usher, and TLC.

A3C

Some of the biggest names hip-hop will perform at this week's A3C Festival and Conference in Atlanta.  But this event isn't just about music.  Also on the agenda: discussions about mental health and moving civil rights protests beyond social media. Two women will lead the dialogue.  Dina Marto is owner and founder of Twelve Music Studios and Ashley Reid is founder the social justice group "The People Assembly." 

Explore Georgia

“100 Plates Locals Love” is a list of the best dishes served by Georgia restaurants, as voted on by people across the state.

My colleagues over at GPB TV’s "Georgia Traveler" traveled all over Georgia trying these plates.

Since I never want to be left out, I decided to bring a few plates into the studio to taste test.

Joining me is the list’s curator Atlanta-based Chef Jennifer Booker.

Dawn Belisle | Delights by Dawn

46 years old

Originally from Brooklyn, NY

2nd business started

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Americans have been starting small businesses for centuries.

So why does it seems like every new business is suddenly a “startup?”

To unpack the jargon, Rickey Bevington spoke with Cassius Butts, Region IV Director of the U.S. Small Business Administration.

 

 

 Interview Highlights

On the definition of startup