Roy Moore

AP Photos (David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the candidates for Mayor of Atlanta slug it out in their first runoff debate.  Did we learn anything new about the matchup between Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood?   A Democratic state representative has introduced legislation to ban “bump stocks” in Georgia and one GOP candidate for governor is already attacking the measure.  How will it fare in the 2018 session?  Plus, after attacking GOP Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, Democrats now have one of their own being called out for sexual harassment.  How will the Al Franken episode resonate on Cap

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Thursday that President Trump believes the allegations of sexual misconduct and sexual assault against Alabama GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore are "very troubling and should be taken seriously" but stopped short of calling on him to step aside as other national Republican leaders have.

"He believes the people of Alabama should make the decision of who their next senator is going to be," said Sanders, who added later that she didn't expect Trump to campaign for Moore.

Brynn Anderson / The Associated Press

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race, but one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture.

The news did not improve this week for Roy Moore, the Alabama Republican nominee for a U.S. Senate seat who is facing sexual assault allegations. While new accusers came forward, several of Moore's previous, prominent supporters took a step back.

Nonetheless, Moore's prospects of a Senate career remain remarkably good. And the realization is setting in on official Washington that senators may have no good options for keeping Moore out if he wins at the ballot box next month.

(AP Photo)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," "Hardball" host Chris Matthews joins us to discuss his new book, which offers fresh insights on the life of Robert Kennedy.  Matthews sees Kennedy as a shining example of the kind, moral leader he thinks is absent from the political scene today. Also, we’ll look at the latest developments in Alabama and in Washington in the ongoing Roy Moore controversy. Despite increasing pressure, Moore seems determined to say in the race. Plus, Hillary Clinton tells a packed house in Atlanta that Trump fever has broken and the tide is turning.

Updated at 6:38 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is getting more specific about what he sees as perhaps the best, if impractical, option for preventing an Alabama Senate seat from falling into the hands of GOP nominee Roy Moore or a Democrat. Meanwhile, the Republican National Committee has pulled its financial support from Moore's campaign.

With his U.S. Senate campaign in Alabama suddenly endangered by allegations that he had sexually abused a minor, GOP candidate Roy Moore sought to turn the crisis to his political advantage by portraying it as an "us vs. them" confrontation.

"We are in the midst of a spiritual battle with those who want to silence our message," he tweeted.

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This is another week when Republicans would rather be promoting tax reform. Instead they are focused on their party's candidate for United States Senate from Alabama, Roy Moore.

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Brynn Anderson / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore fights back against allegations he once initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl. Response to the explosive report is further splitting the GOP. Also, Tom Price is out as Health and Human Services Secretary, but an investigation into his use of luxury private jets and the leaks that led to his ouster continue to rock the department. Plus, two former mayors of Atlanta weigh in on the dynamics of the runoff mayoral contest. They contend that city hall corruption will be an issue, as will race.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET on Tuesday

Roy Moore, the embattled GOP candidate for an Alabama Senate seat, continued Saturday morning to deny allegations of sexual misconduct with teenagers, including an episode with a 14-year-old girl when he was 32.

(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a bad week for Republicans is now even worse: accusations of inappropriate behavior by Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore puts what should be a safe GOP seat in jeopardy.  Then, in an effort to end a boiling controversy, Kennesaw State University now says cheerleaders can take

Updated at 7:57 p.m. ET

Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore is continuing to deny a Thursday Washington Post report detailing allegations that he initiated sexual contact with a 14-year-old girl when he was 32.

Top Senate Republicans are calling for Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore to step aside if allegations published Thursday by The Washington Post are true.

Updated on Friday at 12:40 a.m. ET

Roy Moore, the Republican nominee for the open Senate seat in Alabama, is facing an accusation from a woman who says that he initiated sexual contact when she was 14 years old and he was a 32-year-old assistant district attorney.

It has been a quarter of a century since reliably red Alabama elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate. But Democrats see an opening in the upcoming special election to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions' old seat because of the controversial record of Republican candidate Roy Moore, which includes twice being removed from public office.

After the candidate whom President Trump backed in Tuesday's Alabama Senate primary, Luther Strange, lost to Roy Moore, Trump summarily deleted several tweets he had made in support of Strange. However, they were archived on ProPublica's Politiwhoops website.

Among them: "Luther Strange has been shooting up in the Alabama polls since my endorsement. Finish the job-vote today for "Big Luther"

And: "ALABAMA, get out and vote for Luther Strange-he has proven to me that he will never let you down!#MAGA"

Martin Falbisoner / CC

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the same week that yet another Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare goes down in defeat, Congress faces crucial deadlines for existing programs that have a big impact on health care in Georgia. Charity hospitals could lose millions of dollars in federal financial aid. Federal funds to help pay for medical expenses for children from low-income families also face elimination. Will Congress act to save these programs?

After winning Tuesday night's Alabama GOP Senate primary runoff, Roy Moore is one step closer to the United States Senate. The anti-establishment conservative could give Republican leaders plenty of headaches if he wins the general election in December.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

Conservative firebrand Roy Moore rolled to an easy win in the Alabama GOP Senate primary runoff, defeating appointed Sen. Luther Strange, the preferred candidate of both President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Tuesday night, both Trump and McConnell pledged their support for Moore going forward.

President Trump's brand faces a major test on Tuesday in the Alabama Republican Senate primary runoff.

His preferred candidate is Luther Strange, the incumbent senator who has consistently trailed in the polls to firebrand conservative Roy Moore, a former state Supreme Court justice.

Trump was just in Alabama stumping for Strange on Friday, where he landed himself in controversy, calling for the firing of NFL players who don't stand for the national anthem.