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Brian Brown

As metro Atlanta grows, the population of rural Georgia shrinks. Photographer Brian Brown is documenting the architecture of the country before it disappears. He started where he grew up, and created the website “Vanishing South Georgia.” Now he has sites devoted to North and Coastal Georgia, too. We talk with Brown about what there is to learn from decaying houses and shuttered storefronts.

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. 

JIM MELVIN / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

For a while, Purple Ribbon Sugarcane thrived on Sapelo Island, off the Georgia coast. Then, disease nearly wiped it out altogether in North America, but it’s been brought back, thanks to a team of farmers, geneticists, and historians.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools.  We’ll look at how she’s rebuilding a school system rocked by a scandal that made national headlines before her arrival and we’ll ask her to weigh in on the impact that state education policies championed by Governor Deal and Trump administration proposals are having on public schools.  Plus, we’ll access the impact of the vulgar remarks President Trump allegedly made about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries.

Have you ever wisecracked that you’d like to escape your troubles by running off to join a circus? It was no joke for brothers George and Willie Muse at the turn of the last century. These African American brothers, born albinos to a poor sharecropper’s family, were kidnaped from the tobacco fields in rural Virginia. For decades, they were displayed as freaks in the circuses that crisscrossed America for many years.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we are at the Georgia State Capitol for Governor Nathan Deal’s final State of the State address.  What are his plans for restoring economic vitality to rural Georgia communities?  What about expanded transit in metro Atlanta?  How will he cap his progressive reforms in the criminal justice system?  And, what does he see as his legacy accomplishments?  Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle, House Speaker David Ralston and others stop by to react to the speech.

Panelists:

Blessings in a Bookbag on Facebook

Looking to have a fun weekend in Savannah? Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag and Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar have some ideas.

Marianne's picks:

-You can shop for a cause at Whole Foods Thursday, when five percent of sales will benefit the Forsyth Farmers' Market. Thursday, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

SpaceX continues to make headlines, sending its Falcon rockets into space and if Georgia has its way, those rockets could soon blast off from Camden County.

A public report on Camden County’s bid for a spaceport came out recently. Laura Forczyk is an author of it, and the owner of Astralytical. The Atlanta-based consulting firm is working on Camden County’s plans for a launch site.

 

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump visits Atlanta for the college football national championship game.  What plans do protestors have to make their voices heard?  Also, the Georgia Legislature is back in session.  Will lawmakers steer clear of hot button issues as they prepare to face elections later this year?  And, there are new plans to rebrand the state’s most prominent tribute to the Confederacy.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Jim Galloway

Democratic Consultant Tharon Johnson

GPB News / Cindy Hill

After a career spanning nearly four decades, Tom Barton retires today from Savannah Morning News. He started as a reporter 39 years ago. Ten years ago he became an editorial page editor. In this time of great change for newspapers and newsrooms, I started by asking what he thought about the future of News Editorials.

AP Photo/Tannen Maury

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re discussing a bill set to be debated in the state legislature that would establish a hate crimes law in Georgia.  We’re one of just a handful of states without one.  Then, Attorney General Jeff Sessions opens the door for a federal crackdown on legal marijuana.  What impact could it have on our medical pot statute?  The White House is now in full battle mode against a sensational new book that alleges Trump’s closest allies think he’s not fit to be president.

Panelists:

DoNotLick / Flickr

Savannah’s City Council recently approved a resolution to rename the Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge. Its namesake served four terms as Georgia’s governor and was a defender of segregation.

The Avengers: Infinity War  was shot in Georgia recently. Another Avengers cast and crew are at work here, along with a slew of movies and TV shows. We talk about who’s working on what with Jennifer Brett. She writes the Buzz Blog for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Earnest McIntosh, Sr. grew up crabbing with his father near Harris Neck, Ga. Later when it came time for he and his son to make a living on the water together, crabs were over. Now McIntosh and Son Seafood is trying to make a living farming oysters.

(Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)

Tomorrow on “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to astronaut Scott Kelly, who holds the American record for most consecutive days in space.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ring in the new year with a look at the major events we’ll be following through 2018.  Georgians will elect a new governor while Republicans are banking on the fact that the state remains deeply red and will continue GOP dominance under the “Gold Dome”.  Democrats say they’ll put that presumption to a serious test. Oh, and President Trump starts the new year with yet another tweet storm.

Panelists:

GaPundit.com Owner and Editor Todd Rehm

Former Pollster Beth Shapiro

GPB News / Cindy Hill

When Tom Barton started working as a reporter in Savannah, the newsroom was filled with cigarette smoke and typewriters. Some 39 years later, the long-time opinion page editor is retiring. His last day with the Savannah Morning News is this week, January 5. We catch up with Barton about his career, and which stories made a difference.

On this special edition of Political Rewind, we look back at the year in politics. From new leadership in Atlanta to the fight for a new governor of Georgia and an expensive fight for a congressional seat. There was also President Trump, tax reform, health care reform, the Mueller Russia investigation, the resignation of one Georgian from the president’s cabinet and the firing of another, plus the #MeToo movement that sent tremors through Washington. All were big stories in 2017, but which ranked as the biggest according to our panel?

Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah-Chatham Police Chief Jack Lumpkin said Thursday the department is poised to move forward as he leaves for Dekalb County.

He said violent crime rates have gone down during his three-year tenure, and that more citizens are working with police to solve crimes. He also touted the department's increased focus on intelligence-led policing.

Lumpkin's departure comes as the joint police department prepares to split, with separate forces set to serve the city of Savannah and unincorporated Chatham County beginning Feb. 1.

Carolyn Kaster/ASSOCIATED PRESS

With New Year's right around the corner, we're re-airing our conversation with Ambassador Andrew Young in the spirit of self-reinvention. We hope that Young, a man who has been working on himself for his entire life, will inspire you as you write your New Year's resolutions. 

On this special edition of Political Rewind, Khizr Khan joins us. When Khan pulled a copy of the U.S. Constitution out of his pocket and offered it to Donald Trump at last year’s Democratic Convention, he found himself thrust overnight in the national spotlight.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

The Georgia film industry is big business - $9.5 billion big in 2017. We spent the hour meeting the people who work on film and television projects that are produced in the state

 

“My Cousin Vinny” premiered 25 years ago to critical and popular acclaim. Filmed mostly in Monticello, Georgia, it tells the story of an inexperienced New York attorney who takes on the biggest case of his career --- a murder trial. We looked back on the film’s legacy with its director, Jonathan Lynn.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will continue to pay for an expansion of the Plant Vogtle nuclear power facility, thanks to a ruling by the Public Service Commission. Our panel will weigh in on how much we’ll pay and look at why the decision has sparked controversy. Plus, state legislators are considering a new tax on phones, television subscriptions and streaming services like Netflix. We’ll discuss the reasons. And, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

Host Bill Nigut reads one of the most beloved of all holiday stories: Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory.” In this heart-warming memoir, Capote recounts the Christmases he spent with an elderly, distant cousin when he was a young boy living in Monroeville, Alabama.

We spent the hour talking about what makes Southern food Southern, how collard greens played a role in the civil rights movement, and the politics of barbecue. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Georgia Power’s expansion of nuclear power at Plant Vogtle is still alive following a unanimous vote by the state’s Public Service Commission.

Troubled $25 Billion Plant Vogtle Project Gets OK To Continue

Dec 21, 2017
November 2017
Georgia Power

Georgia's utility regulators are allowing construction to continue on two new nuclear reactors, despite massive cost overruns for the multi-billion-dollar project.

Cindy Hill / GPB

Think Christmas music and there are sounds that probably jump to mind. 

There's Bing Crosby, Vince Guaraldi, maybe Handel's "Messiah." Well, as it turns out, one of the oldest African-American musical traditions is also tied to Christmas.

That's the Ring Shout, still performed by the Geechee and Gullah people of the Georgia and South Carolina coast.

Don't know the Shout? Meet the McIntosh County Ring Shouters. We caught up with them introducing their music to children at a recent Savannah Music Festival Musical Explorers concert.  

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the Public Service Commission is about to make a momentous decision that will hit Georgia Power customers in the pocketbook and influence the future of nuclear power across the country. Will the PSC uphold Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction of the troubled Plant Vogtle? Will the commission approve a power company proposal to increase the surcharge customers are already paying for building the nuclear plant? Plus, we’ll look at the fallout from the blackout at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.

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