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On this edition of Political Rewind, the candidates for Mayor of Atlanta slug it out in their first runoff debate.  Did we learn anything new about the matchup between Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood?   A Democratic state representative has introduced legislation to ban “bump stocks” in Georgia and one GOP candidate for governor is already attacking the measure.  How will it fare in the 2018 session?  Plus, after attacking GOP Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, Democrats now have one of their own being called out for sexual harassment.  How will the Al Franken episode resonate on Cap

Emily Jones / GPB News

Georgia Congressman Buddy Carter said Friday that he continues to push for more federal funding to deepen the Savannah harbor. The state has already paid its share to get the project underway. But federal dollars have been slower.

 

The price of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project keeps rising. It now stands at $973 million.

 

That’s one reason Carter said he hopes to get things moving more quickly.

We dedicate an entire show to the Southern drawl. Y’all listen up now…

Where did y’all come from, anyway? We can trace the use of the word all the way back to colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson. Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why y'all is needed.

CAROLINE HAYE / PHASE:3

It's time for our annual “Two Way Street” Thanksgiving cooking show. We’ll hear from four of Georgia’s most accomplished chefs, with their favorite Thanksgiving recipes and best holiday memories.

Cindy Hill / GPB News

The whole family - and fans of all sorts of music - can find something fun to do in Savannah this weekend. Marcia Banes of Old Savannah Tours and Joshua Peacock of Do Savannah have some tips.

Joshua's picks:

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race. But one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture. In 2011, the Public Religion Research Institute found only 30 percent of white evangelicals thought elected officials who commit an immoral act could still fulfill their public duties. In 2016, that number had more than doubled, to 72 percent. We talk with Dan Cox,  Director of Research for PRRI.

(AP Photo)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," "Hardball" host Chris Matthews joins us to discuss his new book, which offers fresh insights on the life of Robert Kennedy.  Matthews sees Kennedy as a shining example of the kind, moral leader he thinks is absent from the political scene today. Also, we’ll look at the latest developments in Alabama and in Washington in the ongoing Roy Moore controversy. Despite increasing pressure, Moore seems determined to say in the race. Plus, Hillary Clinton tells a packed house in Atlanta that Trump fever has broken and the tide is turning.

DC Pest Controll

Savannah attracts a whole lot of tourists. And, if you believe pest control experts at Terminix, an over-supply of rats. Terminix recently named Savannah the most rodent-infested city in America, overtaking Atlanta, which has seen its fair share of rodent woes. When Atlanta was still tops for rats, we invited Jason Chapman, vice-president of sales at Peachtree Pest Control to talk about why the city found itself home to so many rodents.

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South. But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society. Carol DeSantis is Director of Breast and Gynecological Surveillance for the organization, and our guest.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Daniel Mayer / Wikimedia Commons

After more than 5,000 survey responses, a task force must make recommendations about a Confederate monument in Georgia's oldest city.

WTOC-TV reports that Savannah officials received 17 letters, 181 emails and more than 4,800 online survey responses after asking for input on the memorial.

The comment deadline was Monday.

Foter

The rate of suicide in rural America is climbing. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds those in rural counties are about six percent more likely to die by suicide than those in cities. We talk about this troubling trend with Andy Miller, Editor for Georgia Health News. Asha Ivey-Stephenson, Behavioral Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also joins us. 

Brynn Anderson / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore fights back against allegations he once initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl. Response to the explosive report is further splitting the GOP. Also, Tom Price is out as Health and Human Services Secretary, but an investigation into his use of luxury private jets and the leaks that led to his ouster continue to rock the department. Plus, two former mayors of Atlanta weigh in on the dynamics of the runoff mayoral contest. They contend that city hall corruption will be an issue, as will race.

UNODC / http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/statistics/data.html

As a nation, we’re having more tough conversations about sexual violence and harassment, as more women step forward to accuse powerful men of abusing their positions. We have profiles for killers and terrorists, what about people who commit sexual assault and rape?

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.

(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a bad week for Republicans is now even worse: accusations of inappropriate behavior by Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore puts what should be a safe GOP seat in jeopardy.  Then, in an effort to end a boiling controversy, Kennesaw State University now says cheerleaders can take

Psychotronic Film Society on Facebook

Looking for something to do this weekend? Bill Dawers of the Savannah Morning News and hissing lawns and Bevin Valentine Jalbert of Paprika Southern have you covered.

Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills has spent his career taking a close look at the Roman Catholic Church. But for all that thinking about religion, he had never read the Qur’an until recently. What he learned about Islam is the subject of his new book, “What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters,” and this episode of “Two Way Street.” 

Mayor Keisha? Ethnic Names No Obstacle For Black Candidates

Nov 9, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Atlanta's next mayor could be a black woman named Keisha — a prospect that thrills Diamond Harris.

The 28-year-old graphic designer exulted Wednesday on her Facebook page: "Keisha, Keisha, Keisha! I just want a mayor name Keisha."

Cliff Owen / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," Democrats finally have something to cheer about, chalking up important victories in Virginia and New Jersey while, in Georgia, Dems cut into the dominant GOP majority in the legislatures. The Atlanta mayor’s race heads into a runoff and once again city voters are confronted by a contest divided on racial lines.

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talk with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

Slaying That Haunted Family For Decades Now Linked To Racism

Nov 6, 2017
Courtesy of Heather Coggins via AP

When 23-year-old Timothy Coggins was found dead and disfigured beside a Georgia highway in 1983, the young black man's family and neighbors whispered that his killing may be linked to racism.

Democrats lost big in 2016. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect Randall Woodfin. Woodfin beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham.

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," after rolling out their long-awaited tax reform plan, House GOP leaders are already facing resistance from their own ranks, and Democrats are pushing back hard. Also, a new eyewitness report indicates that Jeff Sessions was more aware of efforts to connect the Trump campaign to Russia than he’s admitted. Now Democrats want him to explain himself.

Next Tuesday, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall.  A joint investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Georgia News Lab examines the flow of money from city contractors to the campaigns. We talk with AJC reporter Dan Klepal and Georgia News Lab reporter Ryan Basden.

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, which means we'll be getting back that hour of sleep we lost in March. Why do we turn our clocks back? We're getting to the bottom of that and more this week on "Two Way Street." On today's show, we hear from historian Michael O'Malley on the topic of time.

Panhandle Slim / Sulfur Studios on Facebook

There's plenty to do in Savannah this first weekend of November. Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag and Mia Mance of G-100 have some suggestions.

Georgia Attorney General Quits Defense In Server Wiping Case

Nov 2, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo

The Georgia attorney general's office will no longer represent the state's top elections official in an elections integrity lawsuit filed three days before a crucial computer server was quietly wiped clean.

The lawsuit aims to force Georgia to retire its antiquated and heavily questioned touchscreen election technology, which does not provide an auditable paper trail.

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