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On this edition of Political Rewind, we ring in the new year with a look at the major events we’ll be following through 2018.  Georgians will elect a new governor while Republicans are banking on the fact that the state remains deeply red and will continue GOP dominance under the “Gold Dome”.  Democrats say they’ll put that presumption to a serious test. Oh, and President Trump starts the new year with yet another tweet storm.

Panelists:

GaPundit.com Owner and Editor Todd Rehm

Former Pollster Beth Shapiro

GPB News / Cindy Hill

When Tom Barton started working as a reporter in Savannah, the newsroom was filled with cigarette smoke and typewriters. Some 39 years later, the long-time opinion page editor is retiring. His last day with the Savannah Morning News is this week, January 5. We catch up with Barton about his career, and which stories made a difference.

On this special edition of Political Rewind, we look back at the year in politics. From new leadership in Atlanta to the fight for a new governor of Georgia and an expensive fight for a congressional seat. There was also President Trump, tax reform, health care reform, the Mueller Russia investigation, the resignation of one Georgian from the president’s cabinet and the firing of another, plus the #MeToo movement that sent tremors through Washington. All were big stories in 2017, but which ranked as the biggest according to our panel?

Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah-Chatham Police Chief Jack Lumpkin said Thursday the department is poised to move forward as he leaves for Dekalb County.

He said violent crime rates have gone down during his three-year tenure, and that more citizens are working with police to solve crimes. He also touted the department's increased focus on intelligence-led policing.

Lumpkin's departure comes as the joint police department prepares to split, with separate forces set to serve the city of Savannah and unincorporated Chatham County beginning Feb. 1.

Carolyn Kaster/ASSOCIATED PRESS

With New Year's right around the corner, we're re-airing our conversation with Ambassador Andrew Young in the spirit of self-reinvention. We hope that Young, a man who has been working on himself for his entire life, will inspire you as you write your New Year's resolutions. 

On this special edition of Political Rewind, Khizr Khan joins us. When Khan pulled a copy of the U.S. Constitution out of his pocket and offered it to Donald Trump at last year’s Democratic Convention, he found himself thrust overnight in the national spotlight.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

The Georgia film industry is big business - $9.5 billion big in 2017. We spent the hour meeting the people who work on film and television projects that are produced in the state

 

“My Cousin Vinny” premiered 25 years ago to critical and popular acclaim. Filmed mostly in Monticello, Georgia, it tells the story of an inexperienced New York attorney who takes on the biggest case of his career --- a murder trial. We looked back on the film’s legacy with its director, Jonathan Lynn.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will continue to pay for an expansion of the Plant Vogtle nuclear power facility, thanks to a ruling by the Public Service Commission. Our panel will weigh in on how much we’ll pay and look at why the decision has sparked controversy. Plus, state legislators are considering a new tax on phones, television subscriptions and streaming services like Netflix. We’ll discuss the reasons. And, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

Host Bill Nigut reads one of the most beloved of all holiday stories: Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory.” In this heart-warming memoir, Capote recounts the Christmases he spent with an elderly, distant cousin when he was a young boy living in Monroeville, Alabama.

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