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Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talk with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

Slaying That Haunted Family For Decades Now Linked To Racism

Nov 6, 2017
Courtesy of Heather Coggins via AP

When 23-year-old Timothy Coggins was found dead and disfigured beside a Georgia highway in 1983, the young black man's family and neighbors whispered that his killing may be linked to racism.

Democrats lost big in 2016. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect Randall Woodfin. Woodfin beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham.

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," after rolling out their long-awaited tax reform plan, House GOP leaders are already facing resistance from their own ranks, and Democrats are pushing back hard. Also, a new eyewitness report indicates that Jeff Sessions was more aware of efforts to connect the Trump campaign to Russia than he’s admitted. Now Democrats want him to explain himself.

Next Tuesday, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall.  A joint investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Georgia News Lab examines the flow of money from city contractors to the campaigns. We talk with AJC reporter Dan Klepal and Georgia News Lab reporter Ryan Basden.

Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, which means we'll be getting back that hour of sleep we lost in March. Why do we turn our clocks back? We're getting to the bottom of that and more this week on "Two Way Street." On today's show, we hear from historian Michael O'Malley on the topic of time.

Panhandle Slim / Sulfur Studios on Facebook

There's plenty to do in Savannah this first weekend of November. Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag and Mia Mance of G-100 have some suggestions.

Georgia Attorney General Quits Defense In Server Wiping Case

Nov 2, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo

The Georgia attorney general's office will no longer represent the state's top elections official in an elections integrity lawsuit filed three days before a crucial computer server was quietly wiped clean.

The lawsuit aims to force Georgia to retire its antiquated and heavily questioned touchscreen election technology, which does not provide an auditable paper trail.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the first indictments in the Russia collusion probe remain the chief pre-occupation in Washington, even as the president and the GOP try to shift focus to tax reform and a crucial Trump trip to Asia. Our panel will look at the latest developments in the Mueller probe and weigh in on emerging details in the tax plan. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is under fire for his comments on the causes of the Civil War and the general who led the Confederate Army.

Judge Won't Dismiss Discrimination Suit By Slave Descendants

Nov 1, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A federal judge in Georgia has refused to dismiss a lawsuit that claims racial discrimination is eroding one of the last Gullah-Geechee communities of slave descendants on the Southeast U.S. coast.

Residents and landowners from the tiny Hogg Hummock community on remote Sapelo Island sued the state and McIntosh County in December 2015. The lawsuit in U.S. District Court says the enclave of about 50 black residents is shrinking rapidly as landowners pay high property taxes yet receive few basic services, pressuring them to sell their property.

The terms “alt-right,” “far-right,” and “radical right” get thrown around a lot these days. But there’s actually very little research on what those terms mean and who the people are identifying with them. Cas Mudde, Professor in the Department of International Affairs at UGA, is looking to change that. His new book is “The Far-Right in America.” He joins us to analyze the movement and its many subsets.

A full hour of tricks and treats and from the On Second Thought crew.

 

Georgia native Karin Slaughter has written several international bestsellers and they are not for the faint of heart. These are complicated, tough, and realistic thrillers. Her latest is “The Good Daughter.”  It’s about a terrifying event that rips apart a family and the small town where they live. We spoke with Karin Slaughter about revealing the dark side of Georgia’s small town life.

(AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," in this era of Donald Trump, is the “right” losing its mind? The popular conservative commentator Charlie Sykes thinks so, and he’s written a book to make the case. We talk with Sykes about the book and about the breaking news that’s sending tremors across Washington: Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, has surrendered to the FBI. He and his top aide are the first two handed indictments in the Special Counsel’s Russia probe.

ALEX SANZ / AP PHOTO

On this edition of "Political Rewind," how did voter data end up being erased from state computers even as a lawsuit challenging the integrity of Georgia elections was underway? It’s a story that could haunt top candidates in next year’s statewide elections. Also, President Trump speaks out about the opioid crisis. Did he make it clear he’s ready to commit the resources necessary to make an impact? It matters in Georgia, where the crisis looms large. Plus, Obamacare rates are out for 2018, and Georgians will pay more than people in many other states.

Panelists:

Bay Street Theatre on Facebook

As we head toward Halloween, there's plenty to do in Savannah. Connect Savannah's Jessica Leigh Lebos and Savannah Master Calendar's Marianne Ganem Poppell have some suggestions.

Marianne's picks:

St. Martin's Press

Platinum-selling songwriter Jimmy Webb stopped by our studio last month to talk about his first memoir, "The Cake And The Rain." Artists from Frank Sinatra to Barbara Streisand have recorded Webb's songs. Some of his hits include “Up, Up and Away,” “Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” and “By The Time I Get to Phoenix.”

Congress In Chaos?

Oct 25, 2017
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," is Congress in chaos? Arizona Senator Jeff Flake says he won’t run for re-election just hours after Senator Bob Corker unloads on President Donald Trump. Where does the dissension leave the GOP’s push for tax cuts and how serious is the fracture in the Republican Party?

Chris Ballard / GPB

Guns are more controversial in America than abortion, marijuana, and same-sex marriage. Many of the opinions surrounding guns come from what we hear and see through the media. And yet, our passions about weapons reflect deeper psychological values.

Chris Ballard / GPB

Amid the barrage of news stories about gun violence, there are the real people whose lives are torn apart by tragedy. Semaj Clark, 20, is one of them. Two years ago, he was paralyzed after being shot in Savannah. Now, he’s confined to a wheelchair. Before becoming a vocal anti-gun violence advocate, Semaj was involved in gang activity. He says the media have a certain responsibility when they cover shootings.

A special hour about guns in the South: the people who own them, the emotions they stir, how they’re bought and sold, the total cost of gun violence, and the history of laws controlling who has access to them.

Civil Rights Group: School Retaliated Against Cheerleaders

Oct 25, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

A national civil rights group says it has "grave concerns" about actions taken by a Georgia university after five black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem at a football game.

Savannah’s Owens-Thomas House was recently awarded $250,000 by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The money will continue renovations and reinterpretations of the property’s museum. We talk with Daina Berry, Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas. Berry has authored and edited a number of books on slavery in the South. We also talk to Leslie Harris, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Harris and Berry co-edited “Slavery and Freedom in Savannah.”

For most of us, our idea of politics is influenced by what we see on TV. Millions of Americans regularly watch shows like “The West Wing,” “Veep,” and “House of Cards." Georgia native Jay Carson worked as supervising producer and political consultant for Netflix’s “House of Cards.” We talk with him about how to write engaging political drama in 2017, and how much the fictional White House resembles the real one.

Alex Sanz / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," former President Jimmy Carter wants to help try and end the crisis with North Korea. Will President Trump let him do it? Carter and Trump are different in many ways, but they also have a lot in common. We discuss. 

Experts: Opioid Crisis Is Hitting Georgia Especially Hard

Oct 23, 2017
johnofhammond / Flickr/CC

The nation's deepening opioid epidemic is hitting Georgia harder than most states, experts say.

That's one of the messages that came out of a recent conference at the University of Georgia.

Some of the highest opioid use is in the Rust Belt and the Southeast, authorities said.

Georgia Town Honors Graves Of More Than 1,100 Blacks

Oct 23, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Discriminated against in life, they were forgotten by their community in death, buried in unmarked graves in the back of the Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville, Georgia.

The final resting places of the 1,146 black souls who once lived and worked there were anonymous. Though loved ones may have initially marked the spots with a homemade wooden cross or only a rock, the fragile tributes were lost to time.

Georgia Rep. Price Says HIV Comments Taken Out Of Context

Oct 23, 2017
house.ga.gov

Georgia Rep. Betty Price says her comments on people with HIV that ignited a national firestorm were "taken completely out of context."

Price, the wife of former U.S. Health Secretary Tom Price, was in a legislative committee meeting Tuesday when she asked a state health official whether people with HIV could legally be quarantined.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports Price said Saturday that she was just being "provocative."

This year a federal court in Chicago ruled for the first time that workers can’t be fired based on sexual orientation, extending workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community. Yet, a Georgia judge ruled against a similar case. Now that case is up for appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Jameka Evans claims Georgia Regional Hospital in Savannah fired her for being a lesbian. Earlier this month, 18 state attorneys general filed briefs in support of Evans's petition.

David Goldman / AP Photo

On today’s "Political Rewind" we look at where the GOP race for governor stands in these early days of the contest. A new poll shows Lt. Governor Casey Cagle with a significant lead. But the poll reveals a surprising result in the battle for second place.

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