Savannah

Ways to Connect

Emily jones / GPB News

  • Savannah could lose National Historic Landmark designation
  • Port Wentworth council member files ethics complaint
  • Hilton Head to hire Gullah Geechee liaison
  • FEMA approves Ossabaw road repair funding

Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah could lose its National Historic Landmark District status.  That loss could threaten grants, tax incentives and professional help with historic buildings.

 

A National Parks Service study, out Wednesday, says large-scale developments out of keeping with the historic district threaten its integrity. The report also points to projects that disrupt the city’s famous downtown grid.

 

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal says he’ll support the legislative push to buy voting machines that leave a paper trail, but critics say the proposed fix won’t assure Georgians that their votes have been tallied accurately.  Also, a federal court has blocked a measure just signed into law that would make Mississippi’s abortion restrictions the toughest in the nation, and now one candidate for Georgia governor says he wants to take those laws and make them even tougher here.  Plus, a number of Democrats running for Georgia GOP congressional seats are pledging to vote again

Wikimedia Commons

  •  Liberty Co. parents sue over fatal bus crash
  • Glynn Co. tax commissioner dodges questions on renovations
  • Scientists say mysterious sea creature is a shark - or a hoax 

GPB News / Emily Cureton

Editor's Note: Savannah State police chief James Barnwell was placed on administrative leave with pay as of March 23, 2018. The university says it is conducting an internal investigation and declined to comment further on the matter. Attorney Abda Quillian now represents two female officers from the university force. She tells GPB News that the University System of Georgia is investigating two misconduct complaints they filed against Barnwell. He is at least the third person to lead Savannah State’s public safety department in the last five years.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, A new poll finds voters prefer Democrats over Republicans by a wide margin going into this year’s congressional races across the country.  Wasn’t the GOP tax bill supposed to give Republicans an edge?  We’ll look at how the tax cuts might play in Georgia.  Then, Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams defends her vote to make substantial cuts to the HOPE Scholarship in front of an audience of skeptical young voters while her opponent, Stacey Evans, is drilled on her campaign ad invoking the image of Dr.

J. Cindy Hill

“What a perfect day for a parade." That sentiment was echoed by locals and visitors alike lining the route for Savannah’s 2018 St. Patrick’s Day celebration on a sunny, spring Saturday.

This year two longstanding traditions were challenged. First, the U.S Army asked that women not kiss their soldiers while they marched, citing concerns that it makes them look less professional. Plenty of other cadets and officers bore telltale bright red lipstick marks on their cheeks as they marched.

J. Cindy Hill

Savannah’s fountains are flowing green which means St. Patrick’s Day is here.  But this year there are a lot of changes. There's a new ban on the tradition of kissing soldiers and Vice President Mike Pence is visiting, so access in two squares will be restricted.  

 

Savannah Morning News executive editor Susan Catron says this bumps up against some longstanding Savannah traditions.

 

 

On this edition of Political Rewind, we're looking at the headlines coming out of the General Assembly. The House overwhelmingly approves a bipartisan resolution that asks Congress to pass a law allowing medical marijuana research.

Jim McGuire

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to the “royal family of roots music,”  Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn, about their new album, “Echo in the Valley.” This is their second collaboration, following the success of their self-titled debut, “Béla

City of Savannah

Security will be tighter at Savannah’s St. Patrick’s Day parade this year because of a visit from Vice President Mike Pence.

 

Typically, Savannah families stake out spots along the parade route well in advance and settle in for the whole day - with tents, food, chairs, and plenty of drinks.

 

Cindy Hill-Williams / GPB

Hundreds of students at Savannah Arts Academy participated in today’s National School Walkout. The event was to protest gun violence and remember the seventeen students shot and killed one month ago at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.

At first the Savannah-Chatham County School Board supported the student-organized events but later left each school to determine how to handle it on their own. Savannah Arts Academy’s principal, Gif Lockley, offered use of the school’s auditorium but students had other plans.

Emily Cureton, GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, free speech issues.  Students in Georgia and across the country walk out of classes to show support for passage of gun safety laws?  Will they have an impact on the legislature here or in the halls of Congress?  What about students who were denied permission to walk?  Then, Governor Deal reverses a state order denying gun protestors access to a free speech area at the State Capitol.  What led him to overrule the Georgia Building Authority decision?  Plus, Georgia’s Attorney General launches an investigation into an apparent effort by staffers for former

A month ago, 17 people died in a mass school shooting in Florida. To remember the victims, students nationwide are walking out of their classrooms Wednesday morning in solidarity. We talked with student Lauren Bengtson of Pope High School in Cobb County. Her father, Mike, also joined the conversation.  Then, we talked with Frank LoMonte of the Student Press Law Center about whether schools can take action against students who participate in Wednesday’s walkout. 

UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

When we talk about Coastal Georgia’s salt marshes, it’s often in terms of how pretty they are, or all the birds and other species that live there. But how much are they worth? Oceanographer Bill Savidge, of the University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, has tallied up the value of the “goods and services” the marshes provide - from commercial and recreational fishing to storm surge protection.

 

GPB’s Emily Jones asked Savidge why he decided to put the marshes in economic terms.

(AP Photo/Jason Getz)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a charge of sexual harassment against the presumed frontrunner in the race for lieutenant government.  How will State Senator David Shafer fight off the accusation and will it change the dynamic of the race?  Also, during a raucous rally in Pennsylvania, President Trump takes credit for Karen Handel’s victory in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District.  Does a bear hug from Trump strengthen her re-election campaign or make her more vulnerable?  Plus, Democratic Congressman Hank Johnson draws a former Atlanta Falcon as an opponent for his seat.

On this edition of Political Rewind, a surprise at the State Capitol: a hate-crimes bill is suddenly re-introduced.  Can it pass the legislature and become law?  Also, qualifying for the 2018 Georgia elections ends and candidates across the ballot are now in place.  Our panel weighs in on the surprise, the trends and the races likely to be in the spotlight.  In news from the state legislature, a measure to fund voting machines that leave a paper trail moves forward while progress to expand the legal rights of victims of childhood sexual abuse may not.  And, it’s been quite a news day involv

Savannah Stopover

It's a weekend of music and theater in Savannah, with lots to choose from. Bill Dawers of hissing lawns and the Savannah Morning News and Joshua Peacock of Do Savannah have your guide.

Joshua's picks:

(AP Photo/Jaime Henry-White)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as qualifying continues for the 2018 Georgia elections, the 6th District Congressional Race draws a surprise Democratic candidate.  The race may now become a referendum on gun control.  At the State Capitol, time is running out for Cobb County leaders to decide whether they want to join a highly-touted regional transit funding plan.  Plus, the ACLU accuses a Georgia sheriff’s office of hosting a conference featuring a known anti-Muslim, a poll that shows one GOP candidate for governor gaining support, and why House Speaker Paul Ryan is coming to Atlanta.

  • Water Woes In DeKalb County
  • Travel Delays At Hartsfield Jackson Airport
  • City Of Savannah Slowed By Malware Attack

Pages