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Grant Blankenship / GPB

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult? We ask these questions with Elena Parent, state Senator for Decatur.

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia primary elections are three months away, but already candidates for governor have amassed $10 million, and one GOP candidate spends a chunk of his case on a Super Bowl ad.  We’ll look at the latest fundraising totals.  Then, the possibility of another government shutdown looks later this week.  Can the White House and Congress reach a deal on immigration before then or will they once again kick the government spending authorization can down the road?  Plus, President Trump insists the Devin Nunes memo proves the Mueller Investigation is a fraud. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?


AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

The University of North Carolina Press

On this episode of "Two Way Street," we’re separating fact from fiction about the Gullah people. Our guest is Rutgers University History Professor, Melissa Cooper, author of "Making Gullah:  A History of Sapelo Islanders, Race, and the American Imagination."

Dayton Contemporary Dance Company on Facebook

Start your February right with some tips from Tanya Milton, Vice President of the Savannah Tribune, and Joshua Peacock, freelance writer and Do Savannah columnist.

Joshua's picks:

-Start the weekend a little early with a punk show at the Jinx. Athens band Shehehe will join Savannah's own Jeff Two-Names and the Born Agains and Ramages. Thursday, 10 p.m.; $8.

Raed Mansour CDC

On this edition of Political Rewind, another Georgian resigns from a high-level position in the Trump Administration.  We’ll discuss why the head of the CDC is out.  Also, Georgians respond to President Trump’s State of the Union speech.  Plus, we’ll look at news from the governor’s race: Stacey Evans wins a big endorsement and GOP candidates look to show fundraising muscle to compete with Casey Cagle as they face today’s disclosure deadline.


AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

©2016 Paul Stephen Benjamin

Paul Stephen Benjamin is not your usual artist. The Atlanta native does not typically use paint or a canvas. Instead, he uses screens -- lots of them. In his exhibition, you might see TVs stacked high; each one with different images that blend or conflict. Benjamin has a new exhibit at the Telfair Museum in Savannah called “Reinterpreting the Sound of Blackness.” It opened to the public this weekend, and will be on display through May 6th.

Wikiemedia / Whoisjohngalt

The Georgia Department of Public Health says flu is still widespread across Georgia. Their latest report shows 671 people have been hospitalized and 25 people have died from influenza, and the number of people being treated for the flu at home is six times above average.

Coastal District public health director, Dr. Lawton Davis says that’s why they’re offering free flu shots next Friday.

J. Cindy Hill

At midnight on February 1, the Savannah-Chatham County Metro Police department will no longer exist. City leaders voted in July to dissolve the joint department after the county questioned the cost of the combined force. Starting Thursday the Savannah Police will patrol the city and Chatham County Police will patrol the county, with help from Chatham County Sheriff’s Department.

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a