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On Monday, the Atlanta City Council voted unanimously to weaken punishments for the possession of marijuana. Now, those caught with an ounce or less will not serve jail time, and will be fined no more than $75. We talk about this monumental move with Andrea Young, Executive Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia. 

Picnic in the Park on Facebook

Fall has arrived in Savannah, bringing plenty of favorite local events. Heather Henley of Do Savannah and Larissa Allen of Visit Savannah have some tips on this busy weekend.

Daren Wang has made a career out of his love for literature. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival was his idea, and after 12 years as its executive director, he resigned this fall. Before that, he worked on public radio shows that celebrated literary luminaries. This August, Wang stepped into a new role: author. 

Georgia’s campus carry law allows firearms on all public college campuses, minus a few excepted spaces. We hear about the research into the effectiveness of such laws with Matthew Boedy, a Professor of English at the University of North Georgia. Also Mark Rosenberg, former President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health.

Georgia's Win List

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre, both Democratic candidates for governor say they support action to curb gun abuses. How will that play with conservative Georgia voters?

Then, we look at the first face-off between those candidates, Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans, which took place at the Carter Center Monday night.

On Tuesday, the former head of Atlanta-based Equifax apologized many times during a hearing before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee  about the company’s massive data breach. The hack exposed more than 145 million people to possible ID theft. We check in with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Tamar Hallerman, who’s been following the Equifax scandal from Washington.

The less money you have, the more careful you are likely to be in spending it. That’s one find in Rachel Schneider’s new book, “The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope In A World Of Uncertainty.” It follows the lives of low- and middle-income households as they try and manage their money. We sit down with Rachel Schneider to talk about her book, and the personal side of planning. Rachel Schneider will be at Savannah's Armstrong Center on October 12 from 8:30-10 a.m.

Dem Candidates For Governor Spar Over Education, Protests

Oct 3, 2017
Georgia's Win List

Georgia's Democratic hopefuls for governor sparred Monday over who is the better advocate for public education, while rehashing the details of a national liberal conference this summer where activists booed one of the candidates off the stage.

Alex Brandon / AP Photo

John Coppolella was forced to resign as Braves general manager Monday after an investigation by Major League Baseball revealed serious rules violations in the international player market.

Gordon Blakeley, a special assistant to the GM who was the team's international scouting chief, also has resigned.

Braves president John Hart will take over GM duties while the team searches for a full-time replacement.

staceyabrams.com | staceyevans.com

Today on “Political Rewind,” Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans, the two announced Democratic candidates for governor, go head-to-head in their first forum tonight. What tone will they set? What issues are likely to emerge? We talk with the moderator of the debate, former Georgia secretary of state Cathy Cox. And we ask her about her experiences as a female candidate for governor in 2006.

Then:        

Death From West Nile Virus Reported In Coastal Georgia

Oct 2, 2017
Public Domain

Health officials on the Georgia coast are reporting a fatal case of mosquito-borne West Nile virus.

The Coastal Health District of the Georgia Department of Public Health said in a news release Monday that officials have confirmed one death of a person infected with West Nile in Chatham County, which includes Savannah. Two other human cases of West Nile have also been confirmed in the county, where West Nile was reported in mosquito populations in July.

Goldstar

Chicken is the most popular meat in America. And Georgia is the top chicken producer in the nation. Joining us is author, Maryn McKenna. Her book “Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats,” explores the role antibiotics play in transforming our food. 

Dirk Lammers / AP Photo

Georgia has submitted a new plan to hold public schools accountable for student performance. The updates are more lenient on testing. Governor Deal says intense testing is critical to hold schools accountable, but the state superintendent says we must avoid a “measure, pressure, and punish” culture.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Tom Price goes public about the controversy over his travel on chartered aircraft even as new reports indicate the total of his trips is over $1 million. Is he correct that President Trump is on his side as he tries to make amends?

In state news, Macon representative Allen Peake says he’ll once again introduce legislation permitting limited production of cannabis oil in Georgia. What chance does he have of success in the upcoming session? And will he run afoul of the anti-marijuana U.S. attorney general Jeff Sessions?

'I Screwed Up Royally' Accused Leaker Confessed To FBI Agent

Sep 28, 2017
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

A young woman charged with leaking U.S. secrets to a news organization told FBI agents she was frustrated with her job as a government contractor when she tucked a classified report into her pantyhose and smuggled it out of a National Security Agency office in Georgia, according to court records.

Josephine Bennett / GPB News

Earlier this month President Trump rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy (DACA), a program that allows undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children to remain here. The changes impact 24,000 DACA recipients here in Georgia. But the action also includes a grace period as long as people apply by October 5.

When DACA was rescinded applicants whose status was set to expire in the next 6 months were given one last chance to apply. But the October 5 deadline is fast approaching for DACA recipients like Maria Meraz from Eatonton.

Emory University’s Center for Ethics is spending the next year continuing a conversation that Mary Shelley started nearly two centuries ago. Her debut novel, “Frankenstein,” will turn 200 on January 1, 2018. Emory is commemorating that milestone with an initiative it’s calling FACE: Frankenstein Anniversary Celebration and Emory.

Martin Falbisoner / CC

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the same week that yet another Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare goes down in defeat, Congress faces crucial deadlines for existing programs that have a big impact on health care in Georgia. Charity hospitals could lose millions of dollars in federal financial aid. Federal funds to help pay for medical expenses for children from low-income families also face elimination. Will Congress act to save these programs?

Supreme Court Grants Temporary Stay Of Execution In Georgia

Sep 26, 2017
Georgia Department of Corrections

The U.S. Supreme Court granted a temporary stay of execution Tuesday night for a Georgia inmate whose attorneys argue that the 59-year-old black man's death sentence was tainted by a juror's racial bias.

Keith Leroy Tharpe, known as "Bo," was set to be put to death at 7 p.m. EDT at the state prison by injection of the barbiturate pentobarbital, but the hour came and went as the justices considered his case. Just before 11 p.m. EDT, the court announced the temporary stay.

Advocates Want More Police Training For Mental-Health Issues

Sep 26, 2017
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Supervisors for the Georgia Tech police officer who fatally shot a student thought the officer showed promise, but there is no evidence that he had received the kind of training that advocates say is crucial to effectively interact with people who have mental-health issues.

Officer Tyler Beck fatally shot Scout Schultz on Sept. 16, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation has said. Beck and other officers responded after Schultz called 911 to report an armed suspicious person, investigators said. Police have said Schultz had a knife and refused to drop it after repeated commands.

Georgia Plans To Execute Man Who Killed Sister-In-Law

Sep 26, 2017
Georgia Department of Corrections

A man who killed his sister-in-law 27 years ago is scheduled to die Tuesday as Georgia carries out its second execution of the year.

Keith Leroy Tharpe, 59 and known as "Bo," is set to be put to death at 7 p.m. at the state prison in Jackson by injection of the barbiturate pentobarbital. He was convicted of murder and two counts of kidnapping in the September 1990 slaying of Jaquelyn Freeman.

The State Board of Pardons and Paroles — the only authority in Georgia with the power to commute a death sentence — declined on Monday to spare his life.

Rounder Records

Before Gregg Allman passed away this summer, he recorded an album packed with new material. The posthumously released “Southern Blood” came out earlier this month. The heart-shattering album reflects on Allman's life as his terminal illness overtook him. We listen to the record and talk with Allman's longtime friend Chank Middleton and Allman's guitarist and band leader Scott Sharrard.

Jacqueline Larma / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” the panel weighs in on the latest developments in the travel controversy engulfing HHS Secretary Tom Price. President Trump suggests he approves of an investigation looking into whether Price violated policy on the use of chartered aircraft by government officials. In the meantime, Price says he’ll only fly commercial while the investigation proceeds.

Lawyers Ask Panel To Spare Life Of Inmate Set For Execution

Sep 25, 2017
Georgia Department of Corrections

A Georgia prisoner scheduled for execution this week has spent the last 27 years regretting the decisions that led him to kill his sister-in-law as she was on her way to work with his estranged wife, his lawyers said in a clemency application.

Keith Leroy Tharpe, 59, is scheduled to be put to death Tuesday at the state prison in Jackson for the September 1990 shooting death of Jacquelyn Freeman.

Accused Leaker Asking Again For Pre-Trial Release From Jail

Sep 25, 2017
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Attorneys for a young woman accused of leaking a classified U.S. report want a judge to free her from jail pending trial, arguing prosecutors have added no new charges months after they warned the woman may have stolen additional secrets.

Reality Winner, a former Air Force linguist with a top secret security clearance, worked as a government contractor in Augusta until June, when she was charged with copying a classified report and mailing it to an online news organization.

Historic Savannah Foundation

Cuyler-Brownville is one of Savannah’s oldest African-American neighborhoods, having earned its official historic status two decades ago. But since then, over 100 historic properties have been demolished, including at least eight neighborhood homes dating back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Does historic designation actually drive demolitions?

Georgia Tech student Scout Schultz was shot and killed after provoking campus police officers. Schultz had a history of mental health issues and suicide attempts. Anxiety and depression are common in high pressure schools like Georgia Tech. We talk about the mental health of college students with Tim Elmore, President of Growing Leaders, which works to raise awareness of mental health in young adults. Also joining us is Collin Spencer, External Relations Committee Chair for the Mental Health Student Coalition at Georgia Tech.

Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” the panel weighs in on Sen. John McCain’s announcement he’ll vote against the Graham-Cassidy health care bill and discusses whether the effort is now doomed. GOP leaders in the U.S. Senate are continuing their efforts to round up enough votes to pass the bill. The panel looks at the pressures being applied to Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski, whose vote could determine the success or failure of the measure. And the panel weighs in on the latest assessment of the impact the bill will likely make on the health care system.

Today on “Two Way Street,” Emily Saliers tells us about her first solo album, “Murmuration Nation.” 

Today on “Political Rewind,” we talk to two Georgia mayors: Rusty Paul, the Republican mayor of Sandy Springs and Teresa Tomlinson, the Democratic mayor of Columbus. What problems do they share in common? Lack of modern infrastructure? A need for a better mix of transportation options? Affordable housing? Do they believe Georgia is on the right track for growth?

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