Savannah

Ways to Connect

Tybee for the Holidays on Facebook

Have some fun - and get in the holiday spirit - this weekend, with the help of Do Savannah's Heather Henley and Visit Savannah's Summer Bozeman.

Ann Marsden / The Splendid Table

Today on “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to “The Splendid Table” host Lynne Rossetto Kasper ahead of her retirement. For more than two decades, Kasper has been unpacking the stories behind the food we eat for a weekly audience of about 725,000 listeners.

An investigative report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution finds about 12 percent of cops in Georgia schools were forced out of a previous job. The officers were terminated or investigated for a wide range of reasons, including chronically poor performance, lying to superiors, sexual misconduct and inappropriate use of force. But for some, jobs in the school system means a second chance for these troubled cops. We talk with Brad Schrade, reporter for the AJC.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Thirty Savannah residents face federal charges following an investigation of two rival gangs, prosecutors announced Wednesday.

 

The gangs operate in a small neighborhood southwest of downtown, known as Cuyler-Brownsville.

 

US Attorney Bobby Christine said since January, there have been more than 600 reports of shots fired in that neighborhood - and residents have said they’re scared.

Ken Lund / Creative Commons

On this edition of Political Rewind, does Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams have aspirations to run for president? Plus, if religious liberty is a key to winning the GOP gubernatorial primary, why is Brian Kemp backing away from a proposal that would allow adoptions to be denied on the basis of the sexual orientation of prospective parents? And, Atlanta mayoral candidates Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood square off in the GPB debate on the eve of new polling that shows the race is a dead heat.

In January, an ongoing water dispute goes to Washington. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in Georgia’s water rights battle with Florida. Earlier this year, Georgia scored a major victory in this decades-long squabble. A special master appointed by SCOTUS said the high court should refuse Florida's request to cap Georgia’s water use. We discuss this case with E&E News reporter Amanda Reilly, who has been following it from Capitol Hill.

The stress of work can often lead to unprofessional behavior. The scandals surrounding Volkswagen, Wells Fargo, and even Atlanta Public Schools demonstrate how high expectations can produce unethical decisions. Researchers at the University of Georgia just published research on what drives employees to engage in improper workplace behavior. We speak with Marie Mitchell, a Professor of Management in the Terry College of Business at UGA. Karen Rommelfanger, a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University, also joins us.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Senate GOP leaders are coming down to the wire in their efforts to pass the tax reform bill, but even as they scramble to find votes, a new report could make that task more difficult. Who are the winners and losers in the tax reform effort? Thanks to Senator Johnny Isakson, Delta Airlines could be a big winner.

 

Since the early 1970s, Atlanta has elected African-American mayors. That streak could be broken next week. In 1971, Ebony magazine called Atlanta the "black mecca of the South." We talked with Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson, who challenges that notion in his new book.

AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Curtis Wilkie, co-author of “The Road to Camelot, Inside JFK’s Five-Year Campaign,” which tells the story of his remarkable rise to the presidency.

Pages