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On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the first major battles between candidates for governor break out in both the GOP and Democratic contests.  Brian Kemp accuses Casey Cagle of falling for a liberal conspiracy theory, while supporters of Democrat Stacey Abrams accuse Stacey Evans of using the image of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to advance her campaign.  Plus, Speaker of the House David Ralston weighs in on the idea of giving the state oversight of Hartsfield Jackson International Airport and Medicaid Expansion.

Panelists:

Emily Jones / GPB News

The Chatham County Sheriff’s Office will help patrol unincorporated areas around Savannah starting Feb. 1, the county announced Friday.

 

That is when the joint Savannah-Chatham police department will split into two separate forces after working together since 2005.

 

The new Chatham County Police Department does not have enough officers to do the job on its own. Chief Jeff Hadley said that’s in part because hiring officers takes time.

 

University of South Carolina Press

Fifty years ago, babies in the U.S. were three times more likely to die before reaching a first birthday. And the problems driving infant and maternal mortality were even worse in rural areas. Diane Cantor set out to be part of a change. She left college in the early 1970s to work for a federal program providing prenatal care to women in North Georgia. Her experiences inspired a novel called “When Nighttime Shadows Fall.” Diane Cantor lives in Savannah.

Fifty years ago, babies in the U.S. were three times more likely to die before reaching a first birthday. And the problems driving infant and maternal mortality were even worse in rural areas. Diane Cantor set out to be part of a change. She left college in the early 1970s to work for a federal program providing prenatal care to women in North Georgia. Her experiences inspired a novel called “When Nighttime Shadows Fall.” Diane Cantor lives in Savannah. We talk to her ahead of an appearance on January 30 at A Cappella Books in Atlanta.

On tomorrow’s edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re exploring the work and life of Georgian Flannery O’Connor. Her works “Wise Blood” and “A Good Man is Hard to Find” earned her a reputation as one most important writers of the 20th Century. The making of that reputation is the focus of tomorrow’s conversation.

Ghost Coast Distillery on Facebook

There's plenty to do this weekend - especially to eat and drink. Claire Sandow of the Tourism Leadership Council and Lauren Cleland of Visit Savannah have some tips.

Lauren's picks:

On this edition of Political Rewind, big issues bubbling up at the state capitol: legislators renew their interest in state oversight of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a  possible return of paper balloting across Georgia.  

(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

On this edition of Political Rewind guest hosted by Rickey Bevington, we break down the compromise between Republicans and Democrats to end the government shutdown, and the anger that many Democrats are expressing towards Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer for his negotiations with Mitch McConnell.  We’re also talking about how the shutdown has impacted Georgia and how things could be worse for the state if another shutdown happens in three weeks.  Also, Atlanta has made the shortlist for Amazon’s second headquarters, but what will

J. Cindy Hill

Two rallies today drew two very different groups to downtown Savannah today. In Ellis Square, supporters of 

President Donald Trump held a rally on the sunny lawn. Republican leaders spoke to a gathering of around fifty people. Representative Buddy Carter, a Republican and supporter of the president, was supposed to attend but the government shutdown kept him in Washington. He spoke to the gathering over the phone, highlighting the GOP's accomplishments during Trump's first year in office. Others spoke about a return to Christian conservative values. 

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, 6th District Congresswoman Karen Handel is tapped to help other GOP candidates for congress on how to run for office in the anti-Trump atmosphere, but the AJC’s Jim Galloway says Governor Nathan Deal may be the best model for Republicans on how to win. 

Christopher Bartelsk

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re discussing the life and music of jazz singer Billie Holiday with actress Terry Burrell, who’s now playing her on stage, and Emory musicologist Dwight Andrews.

Adriana Iris Boatwright for Do Savannah

The weekend is almost here, and there's plenty to do in Savannah. Heather Henley of Do Savannah and Bill Dawers of hissing lawns have some suggestions.

Bill's picks:

For years, Atlanta has worked to fix failing public schools. Charter schools have begun to appear as an alternative to many of those troubled schools. In author David Osborne’s latest book, Reinventing America’s Schools, he suggests charter school-like guidelines that all schools should follow, including Atlanta’s. We talked with him and Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Maureen Downey.

 

 

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Senator David Perdue puts himself front and center in one of the biggest controversies of the Trump presidency.  What does Perdue gain or lose by defending the president?  Plus, as members of Congress jockey over extending DACA and building a border wall, the deadline for passing a government spending bill hangs in the balance.  If there is a government shutdown this weekend, who will get the blame?  Then, a coalition of faith-based organizations put a controversial religious liberty bill back in play at the state capital.  What’s likely to happe

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low. Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Wikimedia Commons / Author Unknown

Georgia’s Girl Scouts recently joined the debate over a Savannah bridge name. As it stands, Talmadge Memorial Bridge honors a segregationist. The Girl Scouts would like the bridge renamed in honor of their founder and Savannah native, Juliette Gordon Low.  Today marks 91 years since Low’s death. We talk about her life with Girl Scouts historian Jami Brantley. She manages the Girl Scout First Headquarters Museum in Savannah.

Brian Brown

As metro Atlanta grows, the population of rural Georgia shrinks. Photographer Brian Brown is documenting the architecture of the country before it disappears. He started where he grew up, and created the website “Vanishing South Georgia.” Now he has sites devoted to North and Coastal Georgia, too. We talk with Brown about what there is to learn from decaying houses and shuttered storefronts.

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. 

JIM MELVIN / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

For a while, Purple Ribbon Sugarcane thrived on Sapelo Island, off the Georgia coast. Then, disease nearly wiped it out altogether in North America, but it’s been brought back, thanks to a team of farmers, geneticists, and historians.

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