science

University of Georgia professor Gregory Robinson was recently honored with an international prize for his contributions to chemistry. Dr. Robinson specializes in combining unlikely elements. He does this in his lab, and also when he uses plain language to talk about highly specialized research. The idea is to get people to care about science, even if they won’t see it applied in the world for decades. This year Dr. Robinson was named a Fellow with London’s Royal Society of Chemistry. We talked with him about being a self-described “chemical detective.”

Jim Gathany / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The museum at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention features a collection of photos by Jim Gathany. The exhibit is called “A Lens on CDC,” and it runs until the end of May. For 30 years, Gathany has documented the center’s scientific breakthroughs, its facilities, and its history. We talked with Gathany about his experience behind the lens at the CDC. 

Georgia Institute of Technology

The first living organisms on Earth were probably single-celled organisms similar to bacteria. It took eons for those tiny forms to evolve into humans. But how did they begin? Georgia Tech researcher Nick Hud is working to answer that question. We talked with him about his work to discover the root of life on Earth.

 

 

flickr.com

Millions of Americans struggle with the specter of depression in their lives. The problem spans across demographics, leaving many searching for a way to combat the mental burden. Therapy and drugs have long been the two primary ways to fight depression, but two Georgia researchers have pioneered a new method of tackling depression using magnetism. 

We talk with one of them: Emory University neurologist Charles Epstein. 

www.gaytimes.co.uk

The mass shooting at Pulse, the Orlando nightclub, that has left many people searching for answers and worried about the next attack. Several Atlanta nightclubs were recently threatened with vague mentions of violence, but motives and intentions of terrorists can be difficult to discern. According to one psychiatrist, hate is the key to understanding what turns thoughts into actions. 

We talk with University of Maryland professor Arie Kruglanksi about his research into the emotion of hate and what role it can play in tragedies like the shooting at Pulse. 

atlantasciencefestival.org

The week-long Atlanta Science Festival is currently in full swing, offering interactive events and educational experiences for all ages. One event for adults, entitled 'The Science of Sin,'  uses the Seven Deadly Sins to present the latest scientific research associated with each sin. Seven researchers and scientists will present their findings and hold discussions with attendees.

We talk to Emory University’s Larry Young about the seduction of Lust and Sarah Brosnan of Georgia State University about the allure of Envy.