science

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A new study from Johns Hopkins University finds that 1 in 8 organ transplants in the United States involves organs from someone who died of a drug overdose, adding another set of ethical questions to a hot-button issue.

 

With higher rates of homelessness and poverty, as well as diseases such as HIV, the demographic makeup of donors who have died of overdoses is radically different from that of the “normal” pool of organ donors.

 

Could organs from patients who overdosed actually pose health risks to the people who receive them? To answer this question, we turned to Dr. Christine Durand, who co-authored the study.

 

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

Courtesy of March for Science Atlanta

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

  

 

The things you find in drawers when you move.

Old credit cards. Single socks. Concert tickets. Phone chargers. Two foot long dead squirrels.

Well, maybe not the squirrels. Unless you’re a scientist moving to a new lab that is. Biologists save all kinds stuff to look at later. Take the science department at Mercer University in Macon for instance.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Three years ago, a coyote with ice blue eyes lay stock still as scientists took her blood, weighed her, and fixed a GPS collar around her neck on a dirt road next to a field near Augusta.

 

This hour we get into some serious questions about science, economic development and where the two meet. But first, we revisit a conversation about the power of curiosity for its own sake. The Ig Nobel Prizes reward silliness in science. They’ve been awarded annually since 1991, to honor achievements that first make you laugh, then make you think. Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang won one in 2015. She joins the show with Marc Abrahams, founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes.

Reuters

This year's Nobel Prize winners were announced the first week of October. In September, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.”

Pixabay / Ben Reiss and Chris Ehlen

This week a group of scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their discoveries related to our circadian rhythms. Emory University professor Ben Reiss joined us in May to talk about his latest exploration of sleep patterns, “Wild Nights: How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World.” We revisit that conversation, then we’re joined in the studio by Assistant Professor of Neuroscience for Morehouse School of Medicine, Chris Ehlen.

Chris Savas Photography

Alan Alda’s acting career has spanned six decades, starting with an appearance on “The Phil Silvers Show,” an early network TV comedy hit, way back in 1953. In the years since, he’s appeared in countless television shows, including “The West Wing,” “ER,” “30 Rock” and many more. He’s been a star on Broadway and in dozens of feature films. But Alda is probably always going to be best remembered for his portrayal of Hawkeye Pierce, on the beloved television series “M*A*S*H.” The show ran for 11 seasons, and the finale, in 1983, broke the record for the most-watched TV series in history at the time - 125 million viewers.

Meet The Chemical Detective

Apr 17, 2017

University of Georgia professor Gregory Robinson was recently honored with an international prize for his contributions to chemistry. Dr. Robinson specializes in combining unlikely elements. He does this in his lab, and also when he uses plain language to talk about highly specialized research. The idea is to get people to care about science, even if they won’t see it applied in the world for decades. This year Dr. Robinson was named a Fellow with London’s Royal Society of Chemistry. We talked with him about being a self-described “chemical detective.”

Jim Gathany / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The museum at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention features a collection of photos by Jim Gathany. The exhibit is called “A Lens on CDC,” and it runs until the end of May. For 30 years, Gathany has documented the center’s scientific breakthroughs, its facilities, and its history. We talked with Gathany about his experience behind the lens at the CDC. 

Georgia Institute of Technology

The first living organisms on Earth were probably single-celled organisms similar to bacteria. It took eons for those tiny forms to evolve into humans. But how did they begin? Georgia Tech researcher Nick Hud is working to answer that question. We talked with him about his work to discover the root of life on Earth.

 

 

flickr.com

Millions of Americans struggle with the specter of depression in their lives. The problem spans across demographics, leaving many searching for a way to combat the mental burden. Therapy and drugs have long been the two primary ways to fight depression, but two Georgia researchers have pioneered a new method of tackling depression using magnetism. 

We talk with one of them: Emory University neurologist Charles Epstein. 

www.gaytimes.co.uk

The mass shooting at Pulse, the Orlando nightclub, that has left many people searching for answers and worried about the next attack. Several Atlanta nightclubs were recently threatened with vague mentions of violence, but motives and intentions of terrorists can be difficult to discern. According to one psychiatrist, hate is the key to understanding what turns thoughts into actions. 

We talk with University of Maryland professor Arie Kruglanksi about his research into the emotion of hate and what role it can play in tragedies like the shooting at Pulse. 

atlantasciencefestival.org

The week-long Atlanta Science Festival is currently in full swing, offering interactive events and educational experiences for all ages. One event for adults, entitled 'The Science of Sin,'  uses the Seven Deadly Sins to present the latest scientific research associated with each sin. Seven researchers and scientists will present their findings and hold discussions with attendees.

We talk to Emory University’s Larry Young about the seduction of Lust and Sarah Brosnan of Georgia State University about the allure of Envy.