on second thought

Beverly Daniel Tatum leads frank conversations about race. Back in 1997, the former Spelman College President wrote a book called,  “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?” Now, she’s updated the text. We caught up with her to mark the 20th anniversary edition.

Ryan McFadin / GPB News

Savannah’s NAACP chapter celebrated its centennial this fall at the historic First African Baptist Church. The church was also honored by the Georgia Historical Society earlier this year for its extensive role in African-American history and the civil rights movement, from hiding people on the underground railroad, to being the site of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s first public speech in 1944. GPB’s Ryan McFadin went to a Sunday service, and sent back an audio postcard.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the upcoming implosion of the Georgia Dome and the indictment of Paul Manafort. We also talk about one school’s Civil War reenactment, why some of us are not getting enough sleep, and the allegations of sexual assault against Kevin Spacey. Joining us this week are Tomika DePriest, Ed Sohn, Simon Bloom, and London Brown.

The less money you have, the more careful you are likely to be in spending it. That’s one find in Rachel Schneider’s new book, “The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope In A World Of Uncertainty.” It follows the lives of low- and middle-income households as they try and manage their money. We sit down with Rachel Schneider to talk about her book, and the personal side of planning. Rachel Schneider will be at Savannah's Armstrong Center on October 12 from 8:30-10 a.m.

High Road Touring

Indigo Girls -- no “the” -- have been hits since their first release in 1985. One of the most successful and influential Georgia-formed groups, the folk rock pair have gone platinum and won a Grammy, too. They have a show tonight, Sept. 27, at Atlanta Symphony Hall with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. 

Twillio

Atlanta gets more robocalls than any other city in the United States. If that’s not bad enough, in August the city broke its own record for the number of times mass marketers, pre-recorded commercial pests, pleaders, and politicians annoyed people via phone in one month. On top of that, Hurricane Irma only made this problem worse. Maureen Mahoney, Public Policy Fellow at Consumers Union joins us.

Atlanta History Center

Former Spelman College President Beverly Daniel Tatum  is on a long quest to understand of psychology of racism. In 1997, she wrote a book about called ”Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race.” Twenty years later, Tatum has updated the book. We talk with her ahead of an appearance Tuesday night, September 26, at the Atlanta History Center.

Flickr

Last week President Trump disparaged professional football players for kneeling during the national anthem. The president’s comments generated gestures of unity at NFL games Sunday and Monday night. The Atlanta Falcons were among the many players, coaches and owners who locked arms during the anthem to protest racial injustice. Fifty years ago two Olympic athletes brought this kind of silent protest to the medal podium. Track stars Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists during the ceremony.

Learning From Life's Failures

Sep 19, 2017
Patch.com

Failure is a fact of life. We’ve all been there: whether it’s as simple as tripping over your own feet, or as serious as dealing with a divorce. Atlanta author Amy Lyle wants to share, so people can laugh at -- and learn from -- her own life’s failings.

Wikimedia Commons

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

The Breakroom returns to discuss the week’s news, including the success of the horror film “IT” and Harvard admissions. We’ll also talk about Amazon’s new HQ, and the Equifax hack. Joining us in the Breakroom are Hector Fernandez, Tomika DePriest. Stephen Brown, and Christian Zsilavetz.

Author and founder of the Decatur Book Festival, Daren Wang has a new book. "The Hidden Light of Northern Fires" offers a fresh take on the American Civil War. It was released earlier this month. He joined us in the studio to talk about his first novel.

Southcom

Hurricane Irma is howling towards the Southeast. A state of emergency has been declared for 94 Georgia counties. The hurricane is one of the strongest ever recorded in the Atlantic. Joining us to talk about how best to prepare for this mammoth storm is John Knox, Professor of Geography at the University of Georgia.

In the Breakroom this week we talk about Georgia’s Confederate monuments, texting while walking, and our dream retirement plans. Plus, we discuss the benefits of taking a nice cold shower. Joining us this week: Kathy Lohr, Eric Segall, Roxanne Donovan, and Greg Williams.

Ryan McFadin

On Monday, the University of Georgia hosted an eclipse viewing party at Sanford Stadium. Over 15,000 people showed up in the stands to watch the day turn gray. GPB’s Ryan McFadin went between the hedges and brought us back an audio postcard.

Better Georgia

Last week, President Trump revoked another Obama-era Executive Order. This one required projects built with federal aid be designed to handle sea level rise due to climate change. We talk about how the scientific community is responding to climate change denial by the White House with Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News. We also hear from Matt Hauer, a UGA demographer researching how sea level rise will drive coastal-dwelling Georgians inland.

People are descending upon North Georgia’s small towns to glimpse the total solar eclipse on Monday. We caught up with a Georgia Tech scientist and a city councilor from Rabun County about how they’re getting ready for the big event. 

Pixabay

August 16 marks the death of Coca-Cola founder and inventor John Pemberton. It has been over 130 years since he first brought the beverage to Atlanta. We took a trip to the Coca-Cola Freestyle Innovation Lab and learned the story behind the drink’s first pour.

In the Breakroom this week we’ll talk about microchips, atheists, and disgruntled Google employees. Plus, we’ll discuss the ethics of getting an A for effort. Joining us this week: Kathy Lohr, Christian Zsilavetz, Amy Condon, and Steve Brown.

Sportsgrid

The Savannah Bananas are back in the playoffs this week. This comes after Savannah’s collegiate team broke the league record for attendance, again. We talk with team president, Jared Orton. Then, we hear from some number one fans. 

Access Atlanta

Ice Cream. Two little words that can attract a lot of people, especially when it’s hot outside. A festival in Atlanta recently celebrated summer’s quintessential dessert with family events and vendors offering more flavors than we can name. G-P-B intern Candace Spates sends us a postcard from the Atlanta Ice Cream Festival at Piedmont Park.

Wikimedia Commons

Blue Cross Blue Shield is currently the only insurer on Georgia’s statewide exchange, and its premiums are set to go up as much as 40 percent by 2018. The insurer just announced a new policy limiting consumer coverage when it comes to emergency room visits. We talk with Andy Miller, editor of Georgia Health News, and Beth Stephens, Senior Director of Public Policy, Georgia Watch.

In the Breakroom this week we talk about tuna salad, blocking people on Twitter, and the science of manspreading. Plus, we say our goodbyes to The Mooch. Joining us this week: Tomika DePriest, Greg Williams, Hector Fernandez, and Soumaya Khalifa.

Sweetwater Mission

Sweetwater Mission is Atlanta’s largest food pantry, and it focuses on the city’s undocumented workers. Managers at the mission say they recently turned down $35,000 of funding because it came with the stipulation that it should only be used to serve people who are in the country legally. Joining us is the Director of Operations for Sweetwater Mission, Mark Zangari.

Ryan McFadin

Savannah’s First African Baptist Church was recently honored by the Georgia Historical Society for its role in the civil rights movement -- from housing escaped slaves under their floorboards, to being the place where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his first public speech. GPB’s Ryan McFadin recently went to the church service and brought back this audio postcard.

Amazon

"Atlanta Noir," a new collection of short stories comes out today. The book depicts neighborhoods in the city using grim and moody devices typical of the noir genre. Joining us to talk about the dark sides of Atlanta is Tayari Jones, editor and contributing author of the new book.

Yeshiva

50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is filing legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

Wabe

A debate is going on over the operation of immigration detention centers. Georgia’s Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin is one of the largest in the country. It is run by a private company. There are many like it. Critics say those private facilities are problematic. Last year, a Homeland Security Advisory Council said they should be phased out. However, a separate subcommittee wants to continue using private immigrant detention facilities, but that committee wants greater oversight. We talk more about this with Azadeh Shahshahani, the legal and advocacy director with Project South.

Pixabay

A recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that 30 million Americans -- nearly 10 percent of the population -- have diabetes. The study also shows nearly a quarter of them -- more than seven million -- are undiagnosed. And the South, Georgia included, has the highest concentration of people with the disease. We talk with Sarah Piper, Senior Program Associate for the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center at Emory University and Andy Miller, President of Georgia Health News.

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