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Today’s Music Minute features singer Edward Patten, who was born on this day in Atlanta in 1939.

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A few years ago, St. Paul and the Broken Bones stormed onto the Soul Revival scene from their home in Alabama. 

The sound grabbed you clearly, but the thing that held it all together was the energy and showmanship of lead singer Paul Janeway.

In this short video, hear Janeway talk about how this started for him, with his love of Georgia's own Otis Redding.

Otis Redding's Soulful Legacy

Sep 13, 2016
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If Aretha Franklin is the “Queen of Soul,” Otis Redding was the king. He died in 1967 at the young age of 26, but not before recording some of the most powerful soul records that still resonate with contemporary listeners. Last weekend, Macon hosted a festival in honor of the fallen soul-singer, including musical performances from his two sons. Author Mark Ribowsky examines Redding’s legacy from his upbringing in Georgia to his untimely death.

We speak with Mark Ribowsky, author of "Dreams to Remember: Otis Redding, Stax Records, and the Transformation of Southern Soul."

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Before his album of duets with Carla Thomas, before "Dock of the Bay," even before wowing the crowd at the Monterey Pop Festival, Otis Redding was in a band not as the front man, but mostly because he could drive.

That band was Johnny Jenkins and the Pinetoppers, a staple of the Macon music scene in the early days of rock and roll. And yes, guitar ace Jenkins couldn't drive, but he also  had the foresight to give Redding the microphone. The partnership led to one of Redding's first singles, the rocker "Shout Bama Lama."

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William Bell is one of Georgia’s most venerable musical performers, recording and touring throughout the Southeast during his decades-long career. His musical stylings have inspired many artists after him, but the veteran soul singer still isn’t done adding more pages to his personal story. Bell will unveil a new album, "This Is Where I Live," next month.

We sit down with Bell to talk about his life and work and what he thinks about the state of music in the South.

Check out one of William Bell's songs, "Happy."

Courtesy of the artist

In "Tell Me," the neon-charged fourth track on Corinne Bailey Rae's inspiring third album The Heart Speaks In Whispers, the British-born singer-songwriter sets her sights on a new generation. "This is for the dreamers," Rae wails over a two-step beat as her friends and collaborators Paris and Amber Strother shout support behind her.

The names James Brown and Apollo Theater have practically become synonymous; it's hard to think of one without the other. Beginning in 1963, Brown released three albums recorded there. But there was a fourth — recordings from Sept. 13 and 14, 1972 — that has been buried ever since. Now, Get Down with James Brown: Live At The Apollo Vol. 4 is finally out on vinyl, with a CD to follow this summer.

In this month's preview of music coming to Macon, we look forward to the holy drone of Lobo Marino, to a tsunami of surf punk from Repeat Repeat, a show from a godfather of lo-fi recording, and to a visit from a veteran of the deep soul scene. With the Field Note Stenographers.