state legislature

On this edition of Political Rewind, legislators have just one day left in the 2018 session and a number of key bills remain unresolved.  We’ll look at where the measures that have attracted public interest stand and at some of the sleepers that could have an impact on our lives.  Then, for the first time since he became governor, Nathan Deal says the state coffers have enough cash to fully fund schools across the state and his budget includes the money to do it.

(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

The rules embedded in the new federal tax law could mean many Georgians will pay higher state income tax.  State legislators want to find a way to give that money back.  Will they succeed?  Also, a new report confirms what Atlantans already know—the city has some of the worst traffic in the world.  Does that add urgency to the new push in the legislature for expanding transit?  Plus, a spokesman for Casey Cagle has an interesting response to a second GOP gubernatorial candidate using Cagle’s likeness in a campaign ad.

Panelists:

commons.wikipedia.org

In Georgia, state legislatures are conducted on a part time basis. Most legislators are also involved in major secular fields, including medicine, law, and real estate. A recent Atlanta Journal Constitution article cites that many of these legislators are bringing bills to the floor that will directly benefit their personal career field.

We talk to AJC reporter Aaron Gould Sheinin about the potential for conflicts of interest when part-time lawmakers deal with policies that can affect their own bottom line.