terrorism

The U.S. Attorney's Office in southern New York has filed federal terrorism charges against Akayed Ullah, the 27-year-old man who police say attempted to carry out a suicide bombing in a pedestrian tunnel near the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan on Monday.

Acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim said Ullah "came to kill, to maim, and to destroy" as thousands of New Yorkers were using the transit system to get to work and go about their lives. Ullah acted "in support of a vicious cause," Kim said.

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is putting North Korea back on the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism. President Trump says the move "supports our maximum pressure campaign to isolate this murderous regime."

President Trump told reporters on Monday that the Treasury Department will officially announce additional sanctions and penalties on the North Korean regime on Tuesday.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

British Prime Minister Theresa May called Friday's morning rush-hour attack on a London subway train that wounded at least 29 people a "cowardly" act and raised the country's threat level to critical.

London's Metropolitan Police are investigating the explosion on the train at the Parsons Green station in the capital, calling it an act of terrorism. The Islamic State's Amaq news agency said the militant group was responsible for the attack, but that claim could not be independently verified.

Branden Camp / AP Photo

Since its passage in the wake of 9/11, the Patriot Act has become a symbol to civil liberties activists for any law which invades personal freedoms in the name of preventing terrorism. But a new law which went into effect on July 1 has Georgia’s branch of the American Civil Liberties Union saying it’s even broader than the Patriot Act.

First, walking might be good for your health, but maybe not so good for your safety. Last year, 236 pedestrians were killed in Georgia. That’s a 40 percent increase in just two years. We discuss this with Sally Flocks, President and CEO of PEDS, which advocates for pedestrian safety in Georgia.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

President Trump has accused the news media of not covering terrorist attacks adequately. New research from Georgia State University shows the president is partially right. Researchers find there is a systematic bias in the way terrorism is covered, and an attacker’s identity can have an impact on coverage.

President Trump has often accused the news media of not covering terrorist attacks adequately. In a speech in February he said, "Radical Islamic terrorists are determined to strike our homeland as they did on 9/11, as they did from Boston to Orlando to San Bernardino [...] It's gotten to a point where it's not even being reported."

Trump Vows Protection From 'Vile Enemy'

Jun 5, 2017

President Trump said Sunday night that the violence in London over the weekend was a "horrific terrorist attack."

Trump made the remarks at a fundraising gala at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C.

Seven people died Saturday night and dozens more were injured when a van crossed London Bridge and veered into pedestrians. Three men exited the vehicle and began a stabbing rampage. Police shot and killed the three attackers.

According to a pool report from the gala:

The fight against terrorism is a "battle between good and evil," not a fight between "different faiths, different sects, or different civilizations," President Trump said Sunday in a widely-anticipated speech in Saudi Arabia.

This is Trump's first foreign trip as president, and he delivered the address to leaders of dozens of Arab and Muslim-majority nations. The Saudis said at least 37 leaders are present, NPR's Jane Arraf reported from Riyadh.

The man suspected of hijacking a truck and using it to commit Friday's attack in Sweden, killing 4, had been denied residency in that country, officials said Sunday.

In a Sunday news conference, Stockholm police say the 39-year-old Uzbek national had applied for residency in 2014, but was denied just last year and ordered to leave the country.

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