Wealth & Poverty

Ways to Connect

The tax cuts, a government that almost shuts down before passing a big spending bill, a tanking stock market, the risk of trade wars (not to mention real wars), and even bad weather — it's been exhausting to keep up with the news flow these past few months.

But worry not. The Indicator goes back to its roots for this episode and presents you with three economic indicators that we think don't get enough attention — indicators that let you filter out the daily clatter and understand the trends that really matter.

Note: This episode originally ran in 2015.

What kind of person would go out in a tiny boat in dangerous weather to catch fish for 24 hours straight? Everyone. Well, everyone in Homer, Alaska.

Halibut fishermen in Alaska used to defy storms, exhaustion and good judgment. That's because they could only fish in these handful of 24-hour periods. It was called the derby, and the derby made fishing the deadliest job in America. But then the government totally changed the system.

The U.S. economy is not in a cyclical downturn right now. In fact, it is growing. So you might think that the deficit would be shrinking every year.

But no. The Congressional Budget Office says the deficit will be going up for the next 10 years. It will reach a trillion dollars by 2020.

Jared Bernstein joined us to talk about whether that's a bad thing.

Tyler Cowen, economist and polymath, gives us his takes on various parts of American life, economic and otherwise.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter/ Facebook.

There are essentially three reasons why women make, on average, 20 percent less than men in the U.S.

They are job choice, child care, and negotiation.

Francine Blau, an economist at Cornell, has done deep research into the gender pay gap, and joined us to dig into those reasons.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter/ Facebook.

Episode 834: NDA Tell-All

Apr 6, 2018

Non-disclosure agreements, or NDAs, are all over the news right now. You've probably heard about them in the context of the #metoo movement, and more recently, in relation to Stormy Daniels and Donald Trump.

But long before these agreements were used by powerful men to silence women, they were used for much more innocuous reasons. Primarily, to protect trade secrets.

China and the U.S. played tit-for-tat with tariffs this week. President Trump opened by proposing $50 billion worth of tariffs on Chinese products. China responded with a proposal to slap tariffs worth $50 billion on U.S. goods.

A lot of American companies have expressed worry about what this will mean for their business. And of course, for jobs.

Mark Muro, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, looked into which parts of the workforce might be negatively affected by these tariffs.

The U.S. economy marked its 90th consecutive month of job growth in March, but the U.S. added fewer jobs than had been expected, with a net gain of only 103,000.

The unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.1 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said in Friday's monthly update on the nation's economic health.

Max Roser and Hannah Ritchie — part of the team behind Our World In Data — specialize in looking at how the world has changed over the very long run; as in centuries and millennia.

Over the course of their research they tend to come across some non-intuitive statistics that tell strange and sometimes wonderful stories about our world. So we called them up and asked them about a few of their favorite bits of data.

Episode 685: Larry vs. The IRS

Apr 4, 2018

Note: This episode originally aired in 2016.

A lot of people dream of not paying their taxes. Larry Williams did just that. He scoured the fine print of IRS code, talked to lawyers, settled on a plan, and then...stopped paying taxes.

Today on the show, we tell his story. It starts on a camping trip, winds through a jail cell in Australia and a courtroom in California, and it ends up in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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