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Every year at Planet Money, we take a cue from radio legend Paul Harvey and bring you "The Rest of the Story." It's a show where we check in on some of the episodes that we've done in the past year, and tell you what's changed.

It turns out that 2016 is a hard year to wrap up. A lot of the big economic stories that we covered this year still don't have endings. Puerto Rico is still crushed under massive debt. Venezuela is still collapsing. The United Kingdom hasn't yet pulled the trigger on Brexit. And, of course, Donald Trump won't take office for another few weeks.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

It's a landmark that will soon be moved to a new patch of land. 

The home Little Richard called home as a kid in Macon's Pleasant Hill neighborhood is one of eight slated to be moved out of the way of a massive Georgia Department of Transportation expansion of the Interstate 75/Interstate 16 interchange. About 40 other homes will be demolished. 

Episode 744: The Last Bank Bailout

Dec 27, 2016

Neel Kashkari oversaw the government's bailout of the banks in 2008.

And, he says, the bailout had lasting consequences that go far beyond finance.

"As a society we have a core belief, that's been passed down from generation to generation, in free markets," Kashkari said. "We violated that fundamentally when we bailed out the banks."

Now Kashkari is the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. And he's come up with a plan he says will make future bank bailouts much less likely.

Episode 587: Jubilee! (?)

Dec 23, 2016

There's an idea that dates back at least to biblical times. That there should be a moment when debts are forgiven. Its called a jubilee.

The jubilee has not gotten a lot of traction in the modern world. You may remember after the financial crisis, some of the Occupy Wall Street protesters were calling for a jubilee. But it basically ended there.

Today on the show, we go to a country that tried it to see if it really works out as planned.

Episode 743: 50 Ways to Leave Your Union

Dec 21, 2016

In the 1950s, when the European Union was just coming together, not every country was so eager to join. The people pushing for it, like Kimmo Kiljunen, a member of parliament from Finland, had to do some convincing. There were years of negotiations, each one filtered through tedious layers of translation into over 20 languages.

So by the end of it, to close the deal, Kimmo and others added a law to the E.U. constitutional documents: Article 50, an exit clause. Kimmo never thought anyone would use it. It was meant to be a way to make skeptics worry a little less.

Episode 742: Making Bank

Dec 16, 2016

During the Middle Ages, Christian pilgrims en route to Jerusalem had a problem. They needed to pay for food, transport and accommodation during their journey across Europe, which could take months. They also didn't want to carry large amounts of precious coinage because they'd become a target for robbers. This became an obstacle to worship.

Episode 592: Bell Wars

Dec 14, 2016

When you've got two companies down the road from each other making the same thing, you can almost guess the history. Originally there was just one company, but something happened. Maybe someone got angry, somebody left, and they started a second business, a competitor.

Episode 741: Amy and Steve vs. Facebook

Dec 9, 2016

It's Silicon Valley in 2006. Social networking is getting huge. Myspace is hot. Friendster is still a thing. Facebook is taking off. New sites are starting all the time, all of them trying to come out on top. There's one thing in this early world of social networking that is sort of a pain--you have separate usernames and passwords for each account. It's annoying to log in three times to post the same photo in three places, or to check three inboxes.

Episode 740: Burnout

Dec 7, 2016

Exhaustion. Anxiety. Stress. Depression. Forgetfulness. Irritability. Screaming at large bodies of water. These are some symptoms of burnout.

Hospitals, tech companies, schools and law firms all struggle with burnout. Companies try to fix it. But burnout is really tough to solve. Even the psychologist who coined the term "burnout" had trouble preventing it. After working around the clock, he ended up burnt out.

Today on the show, why burnout is such a menace, and how a 26-year-old call center manager tried to beat it.

Episode 739: Finding The Fake-News King

Dec 2, 2016

A few days before the election, an extraordinary story popped up in hundreds of thousands of people's Facebook feeds. This story was salacious. It was vivid, filled with intriguing details. There was a photo of a burning house, firemen rushing in. The headline read, "FBI Agent Suspected In Hillary Email Leaks Found Dead In Apparent Murder-Suicide."

Unemployment dropped by 0.3 percentage points, to 4.6 percent, last month — the lowest rate since 2007 — according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Episode 534: The History Of Light

Nov 30, 2016

Note: This episode originally aired in April, 2014.

For thousands of years, getting light was a huge hassle. You had to make candles from scratch. This is not as romantic as it sounds. You had to get a cow, raise the cow, have food to feed the cow, kill the cow, get the fat out of the cow, cook the fat, dip wicks into the fat. All that--for not very much light. Now, if we want to light a whole room, we just flip a switch.

Episode 738: The Russian Rodeo

Nov 25, 2016

Shawn Weekes is a fourth-generation cowboy. A rope was his first toy. He knows the cattle business inside and out. He is good at his job. But he couldn't find work.

Times are tough for American cowboys. Cowboy crews are smaller and more specialized than they used to be. The U.S. has fewer heads of cattle than at any time since the 1950s. But one day Weekes got a phone call from someone willing to pay him double what he was used to making. The catch: the job was in Russia.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Thanksgiving is always a busy time for charities that feed the hungry. And Hurricane Matthew has forced many of those groups in Savannah to work overtime since early October. The storm created more need - but it’s also inspired people to give back.

More than a month after Hurricane Matthew, many in Savannah are still recovering from the losses the storm brought. Food, lost during the power outage. Wages, lost during the evacuation. Homes, lost to flooding and fallen trees.

Episode 737: 17 Deals In 17 Minutes

Nov 23, 2016

We love deals. Deals in every sense of the word. Discounts. Devil's bargains. Sketchy transactions. We love that feeling you get when you've gotten a good deal. A feeling of victory. We also like that deals are complicated. They're more than math and numbers. They're about relationships. Emotions. Trust.

Episode 736: Messy Nobel

Nov 18, 2016

The Nobel Memorial Prize for economics was announced a few weeks ago. It was for contract theory. Normally, we'd interview the prize winners and then do a lot of clever talking about what it means, but this year we tried something different.

We called on one of our favorite economics experts, Tim Harford, and asked him how we should think about contract theory. His new book, "Messy," is about unlocking creativity, and it looks at how disorganization and improvisation are often the routes to invention.

Episode 574: The Buffalo Talk-Off

Nov 16, 2016

In today's show, we visit Buffalo, New York, and get a window into a rough business: Debt collection. This is the story of one guy who tried to make something of himself by getting people to pay their debts. He set up shop in an old karate studio, and called up people who owed money. For a while, he made a good living. And he wasn't the only one in the business--this is also the story of a low-level, semi-legal debt-collection economy that sprang up in Buffalo. And, in a small way, it's the story of the last twenty or so years in global finance, a time when the world went wild for debt.

dangerismycat / Flickr

The Atlanta Beltline was originally the master's thesis of Georgia Tech student Ryan Gravel in 1999. Now a pivotal landmark of the city's infrastructure, the Beltline has become a source of some controversy. Gravel stepped away from the Atlanta Beltline Partnership in September. He joins us to talk about his concerns, and what the trail leaders can do to get back on track.

Episode 735: President Trump

Nov 11, 2016

Last month, Donald Trump released his plans for his first 100 days in office. He talked about dismantling NAFTA and repealing the Affordable Care Act. He called for deporting millions of undocumented immigrants and building a wall along the southern border. He promised to slash taxes and ban White House officials from lobbying for five years.

Now that Donald Trump is President-elect, what can he actually do? What's possible and what would it would actually take? We look at the laws on breaking trade agreements and how much concrete he'd need to construct a wall along the border.

Why Markets Are Surging After Election

Nov 10, 2016

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Curt Nickisch (@CurtNickisch), senior editor at Harvard Business Review, about why markets are surging, even though investors had previously shown signs of favoring a Clinton presidency.

Episode 734: The Trump Indicators

Nov 9, 2016

Donald Trump won the presidency in a huge upset. And while most of us were watching the polling numbers creep in from various counties in in Iowa, Pennsylvania and Florida, the markets were going crazy.

For today, we wanted to capture a little bit of what's happened in the economy just over the past 24 hours. So we are bringing back the Planet Money indicator: That's where we take a number from the news and try to unpack it a little bit.

Episode 733: A Trunk Full of Truffles

Nov 4, 2016

Truffles are one of the most expensive, sought-after foods on earth. Frankly, we don't get it. They're a fungus that smells like dirty socks.

We wanted to understand what all the fuss is about. Enter Ian Purkayastha, a baby-faced connoisseur known as Truffle Boy. He's has been completely obsessed with truffles since he was 15. Growing up, he foraged for mushrooms in the forests of Arkansas. Now he sells truffles to the fanciest restaurants in New York City.

Go ahead — ask the boss for a raise.

The jobs report released Friday by the Labor Department suggests the time finally may be right to demand a fatter paycheck.

The October report showed employers added 161,000 jobs — and paid workers more. Average hourly earnings rose by 10 cents to $25.92 last month — and that gain followed September's increase of 8 cents an hour.

The U.S. added 161,000 new jobs in October, with workers seeing strong growth in wages, according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Hourly earnings rose 10 cents over last month, a higher increase than anticipated. In total, wages — now averaging $25.92 an hour — are up 2.8 percent year over year.

Note: This episode originally aired in October 2012. Listen to part one of this series here.

The Federal Reserve's policymakers ended their two-day meeting Wednesday without raising interest rates.

But they did issue a statement saying the case for more expensive loans is strengthening. That's because the U.S. economy is improving enough to allow interest rates to rise soon to more normal levels.

In recent weeks, "the labor market has continued to strengthen and growth of economic activity has picked up from the modest pace seen in the first half of this year," the Fed said.

Episode 732: Bad Form, Wells Fargo

Oct 28, 2016

A couple of weeks ago, we did a show about the massive scandal at Wells Fargo bank. How good employees were pushed to do bad things. Like opening up bank accounts that customers never asked for.

Note: This episode originally aired in July 2012.

There's a reason economists don't run for president.

We assembled five prominent economists from across the political spectrum. We gave them a simple task: Identify major economic policies they could all stand behind.

Episode 731: How Venezuela Imploded

Oct 21, 2016

Things are pretty bad right now in Venezuela. Grocery stores don't have enough food. Hospitals don't have basic supplies, like gauze. Child mortality is spiking. Businesses are shuttering.

It's one of the epic economic collapses of our time. And it was totally avoidable.

Venezuela used to be a relatively rich country. It has just about all the economic advantages a country could ask for: beautiful beaches and mountains ready for tourism, fertile land good for farming, an educated population, and oil, lots and lots of oil.

Episode 730: Self Checkout

Oct 19, 2016

Howard Schneider was a doctor treating psychiatric patients in the ER when he decided to transform the grocery store experience. He set out to invent the self checkout machine.

Some parts of the design were pretty straightforward, like reading barcodes and taking payments. Other things, it turned out, were not so easy. Like figuring out when people are stealing. Schneider solves these problems. Or at least makes a machine that's good enough to use. In 1992, he eventually convinces a grocery store to install the machines. The result? Angry shoppers.

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