Wealth & Poverty

Ways to Connect

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

      

There are lots of tools for reviving a dying neighborhood. There are tax incentives, chasing deadbeat property owners and non-profits to rebuild houses to name a few.  

In Macon-Bibb, another tool, this time public art, is at the heart of an effort to renew the city's Mill Hill neighborhood. A few weeks ago, that effort hit a snag: the first two artists in residence here were fired. As to why, that is still not clear, but events leading up to their dismissal might raise questions about how well the art-based scheme fits this neighborhood.

If you watch a watermelon harvest you may never think about the pink summery fruit again the same way.

Two pickers walk the rows. They bend over and grab the 20-pound gourds and pitch them to a man perched on the side of a dump truck, who heaves them up to another catcher in the truck bed. The pickers have arms like Popeye and the timing of acrobats. They like this crop because the bigger the melons the more they can earn.

Oil #1: We Buy Oil

Aug 10, 2016

Oil is everywhere, and in nearly everything: Our phones, our clothes, our food, and our medicine. It has driven industrial progress and technology. It has shaped our civilization, powered its rise. Despite all this, oil has exacted an enormous price: our climate is changing, smog is smothering cities around the world. That all comes, in part, from burning fossil fuels like oil.

Episode 524: Mr Jones' Act

Aug 5, 2016

Note: This episode originally aired in March, 2014.

If you want to send a bunch of oranges by truck from Florida to Baltimore, no one cares who made the truck. Or if you want to fly computer chips across the country, it's fine if the plane is made in France. But if you want send cargo by ship, there's a law that the ship has to be American made.

The U.S. added 255,000 jobs in July, according to the monthly report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics; economists had been expecting about 180,000 new jobs. It's the second month in a row showing job growth significantly stronger than anticipated.

The unemployment rate is holding steady at 4.9 percent, and the labor force participation rate ticked up slightly, from 62.7 to 62.8 percent.

Average hourly earnings are up 0.3 percent.

Episode 715: The Sewing Robot

Aug 3, 2016

Robots can build cars. They can vacuum your house. Robots can even write news articles. But getting a robot to sew clothes has proven surprisingly difficult. It is a task that is still done almost entirely by people sitting at sewing machines--pretty much how it has worked for decades and decades. Building a sewing robot is something of a frontier for automation.

Episode 548: Project Eavesdrop

Jul 29, 2016

Note: This episode originally aired in June 2014.

The Federal Reserve has voted to keep interest rates where they are, but noted that "near-term risks" to the economy have diminished, a sign that a hike is on the horizon.

As was widely expected, the Federal Open Market Committee decided to keep the target for the federal funds rate at a quarter to a half percent. However, a statement released Wednesday afternoon sounded decidedly more optimistic about the economic outlook.

Episode 714: Can a Game Show Lose?

Jul 27, 2016

Imagine you're a contestant on the hit game show Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? You're on the final question for one million dollars. You think you might know the answer, but you're not certain. The spotlights are beating down on you, the dramatic music is playing, your hands are shaking with adrenaline. In this situation, you are not the only one freaking out. The show's producers are backstage sweating bullets over what you're going to do. It's their job to set up the rules just right, so that there's drama, tension, and the promise of a massive payout...

Episode 576: When Women Stopped Coding

Jul 22, 2016

Note: This episode originally aired in October, 2014.

Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Most of the big names in technology are men.

But a lot of computing pioneers, the ones who programmed the first digital computers, were women. And for decades, the number of women in computer science was growing.

But in 1984, something changed. The number of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged.

A Macon Library Battles For Funding Help

Jul 22, 2016

A 9-year-old taekwondo black belt prepared to break a board that his instructor held up. Other children sat nearby.

 

“3,2,1,” they said counting down in unison. The children cheered as he broke the board with his hand.

 

This didn’t happen at a dojo, but at the Shurling Library in East Macon where children watched a demonstration performed by a local taekwondo school. Libraries have become more than a place to check out books.

Episode 713: Paying for the Crime

Jul 20, 2016

* Note: This episode has depictions of violence and explicit language.

On November 2nd, 1983, Darrell Cannon was awoken by a pounding on his door. It was the Chicago police. They told him he was a suspect in a murder case, and they wanted him to confess that he was involved. When he didn't confess, the cops put him a car, drove him to a rural site, and tortured him. Darrell gave a confession that would land him in prison for more than 20 years.

Episode 712: I Want My Money Back

Jul 15, 2016

Sometimes you want your money back because you didn't get what you expected. Sometimes you want your money back because you changed your mind. Sometimes it's because someone stole your money. At one point or another, we have all thought: I want my money back!

Today on the show, we bring you three stories of people trying to get their money back.

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

Jul 13, 2016

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

Episode 710: The Brexit Break-Up

Jul 8, 2016

With Brexit, Britain is leaving the European Union. And the whole thing is kind of like a break-up. Divvying up the belongings. The banks. The regulatory agencies. The people. And, in any breakup, there are two sides of the story.

Today on the show, we hear both sides of the Brexit break-up: the people who voted 'Leave,' and the Europeans being left.

In June, U.S. employers added 287,000 jobs — a very strong number that provided some reassurance the economy is still on track.

The June hiring surge, reported Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, far exceeded projections. Analysts had expected the economy to add some 170,000 jobs.

Episode 575: The Fondue Conspiracy

Jul 6, 2016

Note: This episode originally aired in October 2014.

The popularity of fondue wasn't an accident. It was planned by a cartel of Swiss cheese makers, which ruled the Swiss economy for 80 years.

On today's show: Swiss cheese. A story about what happens when well-meaning folks decide that the rules of economics don't apply to them — and got the world to eat gobs of melted fat.

The great green room, the comb, the brush. The kittens, the mittens, the bowl full of mush. The children's book Goodnight Moon is a classic — maybe too much of a classic. Reporter Keith Romer's daughter wanted to hear the book every night, and as many parents will tell you, that can get a little boring. So Keith went off script, and wrote his own story in the world of Goodnight Moon.

And, after writing his own Goodnight Moon spinoff, Keith wanted to know: Could he sell it? Is that even legal?

Episode 708: Bitcoin Divided

Jun 29, 2016

Bitcoin was supposed to be the currency of the future: secure, fast, independent of any government. But if there's one feature a currency needs, it's to let you pay for things. And, recently, that's been a problem for Bitcoin.

The idea was always that when technical problems arose, the bitcoin community would come together to solve things. But that hasn't happened. In fact, behind the scenes, a kind of civil war has broken out.

Episode 707: Brexit

Jun 24, 2016

Note: This episode contains explicit language.

We woke up this morning to news that the United Kingdom had voted to leave the European Union. The tabloid newspapers in London proclaimed Independence Day. The value of the British Pound dropped to the lowest point in the last 31 years.

Stock markets dived around the world. Prime Minister David Cameron said he would resign later this year.

Today on the show: What just happened? And what's coming next?

Sam Whitehead / GPB

Every entrepreneur starts by identifying a problem. Keitra Bates, who owns Westview Pizza Cafe southwest of downtown Atlanta, is no different.

“There is a steamroller of new interest in this area,” Bates said. “And they’re like: ‘The houses are beautiful. Look at this empty warehouse, we’re going to turn this into a Whole Foods.’ What does that mean for Miss Crowder?”

Note: This episode originally aired in May, 2014.

Violins and violas are like living, breathing things. Many are hand-crafted with wood from a tree. Each one is different. And you know the story--Antonio Stradivari was the master. Some say he was the greatest maker of stringed instruments to ever live. The Stradivarius is one of the most powerful and expensive brands in the world.

Episode 706: Water's Worth

Jun 17, 2016

A country has to sell what it's got. Lesotho always had more rain and snow than it knew what to do with. So Lesotho made a deal with its neighbor, South Africa, to buy the water. The country moved rivers and built one of the most impressive water projects in Africa to deliver it.

Then the drought hit.

All over Lesotho, the grass is dry. The corn is stunted. And cows are dying. Yet the water deal with South Africa still holds. Lesotho promised to sell the water and it has to keep delivering it.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

The asbestos was already being removed from Tindall Heights by the time the politicians were ready to celebrate its demolition.

Thelma Dillard was one of the local politicians there to say goodbye before the pre-demolition press conference. She serves on the local school board and grew up in the over 70-year-old public housing project.

 

“My mother moved here when I was a baby. And I lived here until I went off to college,” Dillard said.

 

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now we ask how far copyright really extends. The law can't be too strict. Here's how Keith Romer of NPR's Planet Money team discovered that tension.

KEITH ROMER, BYLINE: Every night in my house, it's the same story.

Episode 583: Cow Noir

Jun 15, 2016

Note: This episode originally aired in November, 2014.

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET with comments from Fed Chair Janet Yellen

The Federal Reserve Board's policymakers on Wednesday ended a two-day meeting by leaving interest rates unchanged. They cited a weaker jobs market as a key reason for taking no action.

"Although the unemployment rate has declined, job gains have diminished," the Fed said in a statement.

Federal Reserve policymakers on Wednesday will tell the world their latest plans for raising interest rates. The goal is to keep the economy on track. And right now, that is not an easy thing.

Members of the Federal Open Markets Committee track an array of sometimes conflicting data. Economists call this the Fed's "dashboard." So what are the dashboard's instruments telling us about where the economy is headed next?

Capt. Yellen's Dashboard

The demolition of the Tindall Heights housing project in Macon, and the relocation of its residents, provides a lens into the issue of affordable housing in the United States on the We Live Here podcast from St. Louis Public Radio. With reporting from Grant Blankenship of GPB Macon, Devin Katayama KQED in San Francisco and the We Live Here team from St. Louis Public Radio.

Episode 705: The Muscle Patents

Jun 10, 2016

Bodybuilders are competitive. They are tough. And when former-bodybuilder Jared Wheat was pushed, he pushed back.

Wheat runs a company that makes workout supplements. He's got one for stamina. He's got one for virility. These products are supposed to help you get more out of your workout.

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