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Tupac Shakur is one of the most famous rappers in history. Until his murder in 1996 at the age of 25, Shakur was a figurehead of the West Coast rap scene. 

So Tupac Shakur’s connection to Georgia might surprise you.

Washington has a big problem to solve: Can it stop cyber mischief, trolls and disinformation from becoming as much a part of American elections as yard signs, straw hats and robocalls?

National security officials warn that unless the United States takes strong steps to prevent or deter meddling, foreign nations — especially Russia — won't quit.

Updated at 9:22 p.m. ET

The president has fired FBI Director James Comey, who was overseeing an investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 elections and possible ties to the Trump campaign and top aides.

Major League Baseball

On Friday April 14, GPB Atlanta broadcasted “All Things Considered” live from SunTrust Park, the Atlanta Braves' new baseball stadium in Cobb County.

It was the first home game of the season for the Braves and the first time fans would experience the new $1.1 billion stadium complex.

In the show we’ll take a look at important moments in Braves history, at the mixed-use development around SunTrust Park called “The Battery” and, of course - talk about traffic.

Rickey Bevington

When the Atlanta Braves announced their move to the suburbs in 2013, some skeptics foresaw an exodus of residents fleeing game day traffic and crowds.

Four years later, Cobb County home sales are outpacing other metro counties.  

VOLTA create

An Atlanta entrepreneur is the subject of a new documentary television series premiering Tuesday on Viceland.  

On Sunday, about 100 Atlanta Film Festival audience members gathered at Dad's Garage Theater for a somewhat surprise screening of the Ondi Timoner project. "We planned this 48 hours ago," said Timoner. "It makes perfect sense for us to be here because Jimmy's from Atlanta." 

ChooseATL

South by Southwest (SXSW) is an annual conference and festival in Austin, Texas.

It brings together global innovators in media, entertainment, music and film for a week of concerts and conversations. 

The Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce’s marketing arm ChooseATL is bringing a number of musicians, entrepreneurs and local companies to Austin this weekend.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Atlanta’s first Major League Soccer team plays its inaugural game Sunday to a sold out crowd.

Atlanta United hosts one of the league’s founding clubs, the well-established New York Red Bulls.

It’ll be a tough contest for the fledgling Atlanta team.

Yesterday, I drove out to Flowery Branch to see how they’re playing and feeling ahead of their first game.

About three dozen soccer players are scrimmaging in small groups of six at their practice facility about an hour north of Atlanta. 

Climate Reality Project

Several hundred climate scientists and public health professionals descended on the Carter Center in Atlanta today. It was for a climate and health conference organized by former Vice President Al Gore. 

E.K. Sluder

On Friday February 3, GPB Atlanta broadcasted "All Things Considered" live from the High Museum of Art's monthly "First Friday" event.

Orogen is nominated for a GRAMMY for Best New Age Album
johnburkemusic.com

In 2016, at only 28-years-old, pianist John Burke has already accomplished the dream of a lifetime for many musicians -- to be nominated for a Grammy Award. It's for his newest album "Orogen," a breathtaking journey through what he describes as the creation of mountains.

 

 

Illustration: Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Georgia Institute of Technology is known for graduating its students from nationally-ranked programs in science, technology, engineering and math.

A new class taught by visiting professor Dr. Joyce Wilson is using hip-hop to take those students down a more creative pathway than their STEM studies to learn about issues such as race, poverty and cultural identity.

The class is titled “Exploring the Lyrics of OutKast and Trap Music to Explore Politics of Social Justice.”

Dr. Wilson joined me in the studio to explain why she’s teaching trap at Tech.

Burnaway

Atlanta’s creative output is impressive.

The metro region has 492 registered arts organizations from museums and galleries to movie theaters to furniture makers.

Statewide, the annual revenue of arts organizations is nearly $800 million.

To learn more about how arts influence the daily lives of Atlantans, Rickey Bevington speaks with Susannah Darrow, Executive Director of Arts ATL, a nonprofit publication providing arts criticism and coverage.

Featured candidates are Peter Aman, Keisha Bottoms, Vincent Fort, Kwanza Hall, Ceasar Mitchell, Mary Norwood, Michael Sterling, and Cathy Woolard. 

 

Moderated by Rickey Bevington of Georgia Public Broadcasting and Denis O’Hayer of Atlanta Public Broadcasting.

 

Recorded January 25, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The Justice Department's watchdog has launched a sweeping review of conduct by the FBI director and other department officials before the presidential election, following calls from Congress and members of the public.

Bernie Sanders thinks he has a pretty good idea why Hillary Clinton and Democrats lost in the 2016 election.

"Look, you can't simply go around to wealthy people's homes raising money and expect to win elections," the Vermont senator, who gave Clinton a surprisingly strong run for the Democratic nomination, told NPR's David Greene in an interview airing on Morning Edition. "You've got to go out and mix it up and be with ordinary people."

In November, the typically straitlaced Office of Government Ethics surprised observers with a series of tweets mimicking Donald Trump's bombastic style, exclamation points and all: "Brilliant! Divestiture is good for you, good for America!"

There were two major assumptions about Latino voters throughout the presidential campaign:

(1) a record number of Latinos would show up on Election Day to oppose Donald Trump's candidacy and

(2) the anti-immigration rhetoric that launched Trump's campaign would push conservative-leaning Hispanics to flee the Republican Party.

Neither of those assumptions entirely panned out as expected.

Prediction 1: The Surge?

To glance at some of the political news this week, you'd think it was October.

Clinton campaign Chairman John Podesta did Meet the Press over the weekend to talk about Russia hacking the DNC's emails.

Hillary Clinton aide Brian Fallon took to Twitter on Tuesday to question the FBI's investigation into Clinton's emails.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Republicans claimed another electoral victory in the final Senate race of 2016 on Saturday, with Republican John Kennedy defeating Democrat Foster Campbell in a runoff election in Louisiana.

The win by Kennedy, the state treasurer, will give Republicans a 52-48 majority in the Senate come January. He succeeds retiring GOP Sen. David Vitter, who lost a bid for governor last year and decided not to seek re-election.

Editor's note: There is language in this piece that some will find offensive.

Sometime in early 2016 between a Trump rally in New Hampshire, where a burly man shouted something at me about being Muslim, and a series of particularly vitriolic tweets that included some combination of "raghead," "terrorist," "bitch" and "jihadi," I went into my editor's office and wept.

I cried for the first (but not the last) time this campaign season.

President-elect Donald Trump has officially won Michigan's 16 electoral votes, although a recount is possible. It's the last state to officially certify its election results and comes nearly three weeks after Election Day.

Two weeks after Election Day, Hillary Clinton leads President-elect Donald Trump by 1.75 million votes. Despite Clinton's popular vote lead, Trump will move into the White House because he won the Electoral College.

Clinton's margin will grow in the coming weeks — mostly because of California, where there are still more than 2 million unprocessed ballots.

For more than a hundred years, Vigo County, Indiana has consistently voted for the winning president. It chose Barack Obama twice, and then picked Donald Trump this November. In fact, the county is a remarkably accurate bellwether; it's only been wrong two times since the 1890s.

Why does Vigo County almost always predict the winner?

There are many hypotheses, none of which fully explain this quirky mystery of why a small region in southwest Indiana (a reliably Republican state) routinely jumps from Democrat to Republican in presidential years.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Tracy V. Wilson and Holly Frey host the popular podcast Stuff You Missed In History Class in the Atlanta offices at HowStuffWorks at Ponce City Market.

They joined me during our live show from the rooftop of Ponce City Market to talk about what it’s like to produce a history podcast in a historic building – and also some of their personal connections with the Sears company, which built this building in 1926.

Google Images

Every Friday, it’s time to hang out in The Breakroom. Guest host Adam Ragusea and this week’s panel talk about whether the electoral college should be scrapped, how Facebook and Google say they’re trying to stop the spread of “fake news,” and Oxford’s word of the year: “post-truth.”

 

This week’s guests:

President-elect Donald Trump's first week after pulling off an upset victory has had plenty of missteps. The rocky start to his transition planning that one source described to CNN as a "knife fight" has done little to assure his critics and skeptical Republicans that he'll have a smooth ascension to the Oval Office surrounded by qualified advisers. Trump denies that the transition is rocky.

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