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Timeline: The History Of Ponce City Market

Nov 14, 2016
Jerry Hancock

Millennials might have been Hillary Clinton's Achilles' heel on Tuesday night.

Obama won 60 percent of the millennial vote. Clinton got only about 55 percent. (We're using "millennials" as shorthand for voters between the ages of 18 and 29, but some millennials are in their 30s).

But it's not that young voters across the country were necessarily flocking to the Republican Party this year.

Hop's Chicken

We may think about food all the time, but when is the last time you thought about what your food sounded like?

77,000 Georgia Voters Skipped The Top Of The Ticket

Nov 13, 2016
Evan Vucci / AP Photo

According to unofficial results from Secretary of State Brian Kemp's office, more than 4.1 million ballots were cast on November 8, 2016. Of those cast in the general election, over 77,000 voters did not select one of the three presidential candidates listed on the ballot. 

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The election just ended and the new president doesn't even take office until Jan. 20. But the transition planning starts now.

Who's going to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of state? His chief of staff? His education secretary? Now that the news of Trump's election has settled, speculation over how the president-elect will fill out his administration has consumed Washington.

Keeping in mind the truism that nobody who knows is talking, and those who are talking don't really know, here are some of the names being floated, leaked and speculated about.

In 2016, the polls got it wrong. They failed to predict that Donald Trump was winning key battleground states. But a startup in San Francisco says it spotted it well in advance, not because of the "enthusiasm gap" — Republicans turning out and Democrats staying at home. Instead, the startup Brigade's data pointed to a big crossover effect: Democrats voting for Trump in droves.

The company built an app that asks a simple question: Which candidate are you going to vote for?

Why Markets Are Surging After Election

Nov 10, 2016

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Curt Nickisch (@CurtNickisch), senior editor at Harvard Business Review, about why markets are surging, even though investors had previously shown signs of favoring a Clinton presidency.

Was Trump's Victory A Loss For Polling?

Nov 10, 2016

There are a lot of questions being raised about polling in the wake of Tuesday’s election results. Most polls gave Hillary Clinton a big chance of winning, but that’s not what happened.

During his presidential campaign, Republican Donald Trump said he would "get rid of" Dodd-Frank — the sweeping legislation passed in 2010 to address problems underlying the 2008-2009 financial crisis.

Many Republicans hate the 2,300-page law, saying it is layered with far too many regulations. But Democrats say it provides valuable oversight of an industry that they believe took too many risks on Wall Street and too much advantage of customers on Main Street.

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And now let's get some election reaction from a group who couldn't actually vote. It is a classroom of sixth-graders. NPR's Eric Westervelt, with our Ed team, spent time with a middle-school class in Northern California.

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In his victory speech on Wednesday, Donald Trump was already looking ahead.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Updated at 7:30 a.m. ET on Nov. 10

Protesters took to the streets in cities across the United States, angered by the surprise election of Donald Trump. Demonstrations began shortly after President-elect Trump claimed victory in the early hours of Wednesday. On Wednesday night and into Thursday morning, they spread to several major cities.

The election of Donald Trump was a surprise to pollsters, pundits and, perhaps most of all, the Democratic Party. With Republicans in power in the White House, Senate and House of Representatives, Democrats will now have to figure out their role as the minority party.

Here are four questions the Democrats will have to grapple with as they think about the future.

America has a new President-elect: Donald J. Trump. Emory University political scientist Andra Gillespie, Charles Richardson, editorial page editor for The Telegraph in Macon and Fannin Focus publisher Mark Thomason join us for a round of thoughtful analysis about how the election played out in Georgia and the nation.
 

Then, what should America’s next big national conversation be in the wake of the 2016 election? We get perspectives from Georgians at both ends of the political spectrum. 

John Locher / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," the race to the White House concluded early Wednesday morning with a President-Elect Donald Trump. The billionaire businessman defeated former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton against the predictions of many experts. Our panel discusses the question remaining, what kind of president will Trump be?

Kamala Harris, Catherine Cortez Masto and Rep. Tammy Duckworth made historic inroads on Election Day, becoming, respectively, the first biracial woman in the Senate, the first Latina senator, and the first Thailand-born senator.

And in the House of Representatives, Pramila Jayapal of Washington state was one of several candidates of Indian origin to claim office, in a group that includes Harris (whose mother is an Indian-American) and new House members Ro Khanna of California and Raja Krishnamoorthi of Illinois. All are Democrats.

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