GPB News Presents

Ways to Connect

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Now let's hear from some of you. We reached out to people who are voting for the first time in a U.S. presidential election.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And people from all over the country chimed in.

Valerie Reneé / Flickr

Voter suppression and intimidation is a very real issue in Georgia. We talk with Kristina Torres of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution about the most recent and shocking examples from across the state. We also bring on University of Georgia Professor Charles Bullock to provide context and discuss the implications of voter intimidation.

Lindsay Thomas/On Second Thought

They're a badge of honor on Election Day: those stickers that declare to the world "I voted." Nationally, their origin is a bit hazy, with several people and groups claiming credit for the concept.

Georgia's peach sticker is considered to be one of the best in the country. We find out how the idea grew with help from Candice Broce, press secretary for Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.  

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

III% Security Force

The Southern Poverty Law Center finds that anti-government militia groups grew by more than one-third last year.  Several of those groups are based right here in Georgia. New York Times reporter David Zucchino recently visited one of the state's most vocal militia groups, the Georgia Security Force. He writes that tensions surrounding the election have put many militia members on edge, especially when it comes to Second Amendment rights.

We speak with Zucchino about why armed activity is on the rise in Georgia and his experiences interacting with members of the militia.  

Follow along for up-to-the-minute election coverage from across the web.

The candidates aren't talking much about education. But we are.

Voters are, too — education is rated as one of the top campaign issues this election cycle.

From pretty much the very start of this election season, Donald Trump grabbed the media by the press pass. He didn't even wait. As Trump, a former reality show host, once said in a slightly different context, "When you're a star, they let you do it."

Copyright 2017 WKSU-FM. To see more, visit WKSU-FM.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the campaigns are over, the rallies have ended, and it is officially Election Day. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump crisscrossed the country deep into the night, seizing every last opportunity to get out the vote.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This has been a challenging year for people writing political comedy.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Granted there's no shortage of material. The problem is how to satirize actual events that seem like satire to begin with.

Aside from the cliches that it all comes down to turnout and that the only poll that counts is the one on Election Day, one more truism that talking heads will repeat endlessly Tuesday is that demographics are destiny.

It may make you want to throw a shoe at the TV (or radio), but (as they say) cliches are cliches for a reason. Breaking the electorate into these smaller chunks tells a lot about what people like and dislike about a candidate, not to mention how a rapidly changing electorate is changing the fundamentals of U.S. presidential politics.

Hillary Clinton's path relies on winning traditionally Democratic states and has several potential ways over the top. Donald Trump has a much narrower path — he has to run the table in toss-up states and break through in a state that currently leans toward Clinton.

Here are seven ways Election Day could play out:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It is hard to keep track of all the ways that today's election could make history.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Hillary Clinton, if she wins, would come to be the first female president.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The day that everyone has been talking about is finally here. While millions of Americans have already cast their ballots in early-voting states, the majority of votes will be cast today.

NPR will have live results as polls close at 7 p.m. ET right here on NPR.org and on your local NPR station.

It's been hard to find voices of hope this election season. People seem to feel they're choosing between the lesser of two evils.

Not E.J. Johnson: "This is mostly, one of the mostly, heart-racing thrilling things I've ever done!"

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," the closing arguments are being made as candidates and their surrogates wind down their last minute push toward the White House. We bring you the most up-to-date information from the trail and the latest reports filed from across the country and here in Georgia. 

Did your last round of utility bill payments break the bank? If you live in Atlanta, it turns out you’re probably paying more than everyone else in the country. The home listing website Trulia recently published a study on metro Atlanta’s utility prices. We’ll speak with Trulia housing data analyst Felipe Chacon, who conducted the study.

Dissatisfied Georgia Voters Skip Top Of The Ticket

Nov 7, 2016
Ezra Morris / GPB

As election season winds down, two Georgia voters say they will not be voting for president on November 8. Retired US Army Colonel Robert Roth from Columbus, Georgia is a veteran of three combat tours, registered Republican, and father of four. Emory student Arhum Qazi from Macon, Georgia is the son of Muslim immigrant parents. Both have said they do not have plans to vote for either Trump or Clinton but do plan to vote in down-ballot races. 

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

The twists and turns of the 2016 election — not to mention the characters at the top of each major-party ticket — provide many opportunities for comedy. But it's tough out there for late-night joke-makers, who face more competition than ever, not to mention a social-media landscape in which seemingly every possible quip is being made in real time.

The U.S. Justice Department says it will have more than 500 monitors and observers out Tuesday watching polling sites in 28 states. They'll be looking for any voting rights violations, such as whether voters are discriminated against because of their race or language.

"The bedrock of our democracy is the right to vote, and the Department of Justice works tirelessly to uphold that right, not only on Election Day, but every day," Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in a statement.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

FiveThirtyEight

On Nov. 8, the presidency will be decided once one of the candidates reaches 270 electoral votes. Electoral votes are cast by members of the Electoral College. That's something most people know, but what they don't know is how exactly the Electoral College works.

Republicans are feeling the best they have this cycle about their chances of holding their majority in the U.S. Senate, but doing that would require several states to break their way on election night. That's a risky place to be one day before control of the Senate is decided.

The tightening of the presidential race over the past week may have had an impact on these Senate contests. Most of the contests remain firm toss-ups, though Democrats still have multiple paths to winning back the five seats they need (or just four if Democrat Hillary Clinton wins the presidency).

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Pages