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And now let's get some election reaction from a group who couldn't actually vote. It is a classroom of sixth-graders. NPR's Eric Westervelt, with our Ed team, spent time with a middle-school class in Northern California.

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In his victory speech on Wednesday, Donald Trump was already looking ahead.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Updated at 7:30 a.m. ET on Nov. 10

Protesters took to the streets in cities across the United States, angered by the surprise election of Donald Trump. Demonstrations began shortly after President-elect Trump claimed victory in the early hours of Wednesday. On Wednesday night and into Thursday morning, they spread to several major cities.

The election of Donald Trump was a surprise to pollsters, pundits and, perhaps most of all, the Democratic Party. With Republicans in power in the White House, Senate and House of Representatives, Democrats will now have to figure out their role as the minority party.

Here are four questions the Democrats will have to grapple with as they think about the future.

America has a new President-elect: Donald J. Trump. Emory University political scientist Andra Gillespie, Charles Richardson, editorial page editor for The Telegraph in Macon and Fannin Focus publisher Mark Thomason join us for a round of thoughtful analysis about how the election played out in Georgia and the nation.
 

Then, what should America’s next big national conversation be in the wake of the 2016 election? We get perspectives from Georgians at both ends of the political spectrum. 

John Locher / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," the race to the White House concluded early Wednesday morning with a President-Elect Donald Trump. The billionaire businessman defeated former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton against the predictions of many experts. Our panel discusses the question remaining, what kind of president will Trump be?

Kamala Harris, Catherine Cortez Masto and Rep. Tammy Duckworth made historic inroads on Election Day, becoming, respectively, the first biracial woman in the Senate, the first Latina senator, and the first Thailand-born senator.

And in the House of Representatives, Pramila Jayapal of Washington state was one of several candidates of Indian origin to claim office, in a group that includes Harris (whose mother is an Indian-American) and new House members Ro Khanna of California and Raja Krishnamoorthi of Illinois. All are Democrats.

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Finally, we have come to the end, the end of a presidential process that began well over one year ago, kicking off in primaries that included close to 20 Republican candidates and half a dozen Democrats.

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Gage Skidmore / flickr

If there's anything to say about the results of the presidential race— it's that it defied expectations. Many expected to wake up Wednesday morning to hear from President-elect Hillary Clinton. Instead, it was Donald Trump wh o came out on top.

President Obama, saying "we are all rooting for his success," vowed his staff would work as hard as it can to ensure a successful transition of power to president-elect Donald Trump.

Republicans have been vowing for six years now to repeal the Affordable Care Act. They have voted to do so dozens of times, despite knowing any measures would be vetoed by President Obama.

But the election of Donald Trump as president means Republican lawmakers wouldn't even have to pass repeal legislation to stop the health law from functioning. Instead, President Trump could do much of it with a stroke of a pen.

Proposition 60, California's controversial ballot measure that would require adult film performers to use condoms, has been rejected by a margin of nearly 54 percent against and 46 percent in favor, with 99 percent of precincts reporting.

The measure has been a topic of heated debate, pitting the Free Speech Coalition, the adult entertainment industry's trade association, against the AIDS Healthcare Foundation.

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